Benjamin (3rd) Clayton

Run No.176

"BLOWERING STATION"

East Blowering Road,(Monaro Highway)

Blowering. Via Tumut.NSW.

Dr Benjamin (3rd) CLAYTON. JP

1805 to 1854

First of seven owners

Originally 25,600 acres

Ownership from about 1837 to 1840.

Sold to Captain John Charles WHITTY

BIRTH

1805 - Dr Benjamin (3rd) Clayton was born in Baltinglass, near Dublin, Ireland on the 22nd February,1805. His parents being Samuel CLAYTON & Jane MAGUIRE.

DEATH

Benjamin (3rd) died at the age of 49 years on the 15th September 1854 in Balmain, Sydney. NSW.- (Ref- The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954)(about) Previous issue Saturday 16 September 1854).

MARRIAGE

1834 Dr Benjamin (3rd) CLAYTON & Miss Frances Matilda BROUGHTON On the 18th January, 1835, were married in (CI) St Peters, Church of England Campbelltown, (Co. Aird) - (Ref NSW BDM No.V1834328 18).

1834 (Newspaper report) - MARRIED.— By Special License, at Campbelltown, on Saturday, the 18th January, 1835, by the Rev. T. Reddall, Benjamin Clayton, Esq. Member of the Royal College of Surgeons, of London; to Frances Matilda, fifth daughter of the late William Broughton, Esq. (D.A.C.G.) - Deputy Assistant Commissary-General. (Ref- The Sydney Herald (NSW : 1831 - 1842)(about) Previous issue Monday 20 January 1834).

CHILDREN born to Benjamin (3rd) & Francis Mathilda CLAYTON. Children: Nine children between 1835-1853

1. 1835 - James Edward CLAYTON, was born in 1835 - (Ref NSW BDM No.V1835892 19) - In 1863 James married Miss Eliza ANDREWS, in TUMUT - (BDM No. 3000/1863) Then about 75 years later in 1910 James E died in Young, NSW - (Ref NSW BDM No.11866) - Married in 1900 to Miss Florence Fanny Broughton - Died: 1910 - Young, NSW

2. 1837 - Benjamin (4th) CLAYTON, was born on the 23rd December, 1837.

3. 1841 - Frances Eliza CLAYTON, parents were BENJAMIN & FRANCES M - (Ref - NSW BDM V18411645 25A) - MARRIAGE - In 1867 Frances married Mr James R GARLAND in CAMPBELLTOWN. NSW - (Ref- NSW BDM 1821/1867 ) - DIED - In 1925 France E GARLAND died in BOWRAL.NSW -(Ref- NSW BDM 9130/1925).

4. 1843 - Emma Johnson CLAYTON, was born in Tumut, NSW - (Ref:- NSW BDM V18431599 27A) - MARRIAGE, In 1873 she married Mr John Kennedy HUME in CAMPBELLTOWN, NSW - (Ref- NSW BDM 2138/1873 ) - She died in 1919 in CAMPBELLTOWN. - (Ref- NSW BDM 23372/1919).

5. 1845 - Broughton Garland CLAYTON, born in Tumut, NSW parents were BENJAMIN & FRANCES M - (Ref NSW BDM V18451970 30A) - He died ABT 1845.

6. 1846 - Kennedy CLAYTON, was born in Tumut, NSW - (Ref - V18461647 32A) - MARRIAGE - 1879 Kennedy married Miss Margaret E MARR in WAGGA WAGGA. - (REf- NSW BDM 4977/1879).

7. 1848 - Bland CLAYTON, was born in Tumut, NSW - (Ref - V18481821 34A/1848) - Then 1874 he married Francis Eliza BROUGHTON in TUMUT. (Ref:-Marriages NSW BDM 3991).

8. 1851 - Margaret Jane CLAYTON, parents were BENJAMIN & FRANCES M - (Ref NSW BDM V18512066 37A)

9. 1853 - Ultima CLAYTON, parents BENJAMIN & FRANCES M was born, records of the BDM do not show a town. - (Ref NSW BDM No.V1853763 40) - In 1936 Ultima CLAYTON died in Campbelltown, NSW, at the age of about 89 years - (Ref NSW BDM No.8896) - Newspaper - CLAYTON.–March 26, 1936, at her home, Weerona, Minto, Ultima, youngest daughter of the late Dr. Benjamin Clayton, of Baltlnglass, Gunning, - (Ref- The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954)(about) Previous issue Friday 27 March 1936 Page 10).

1847 - NEW MAGISTRATES.-

His Excellency the Governor has been pleased to appoint the undermentioned gentlemen to be magistrates of the territory and its dependencies, viz. :- Benjamin Clayton, Esq.,of Baltinglass, Gunning; - (Ref- Sydney Chronicle (NSW : 1846 - 1848)(about) Previous issue Thursday 16 September 1847 Page 3).

IMMIGRATION TO AUSTRALIA

As a young boy of 11 years he travelled to Australia on board the convict ship "Surry" with his father who was a widower. Samuel CLAYTON who was travelling as a convict. They settled in Sydney.

Convict ship "Surry" (later referred to as the Surrey)

Dr Benjamin CLAYTON'S AUSTRALIAN STORY.

Index to Squatters and Graziers - Date Surname First Name Station Description Citation Remarks

1837 - Clayton Benjamin - Blowrin - Evelyn Shirley Pitfield Sturt Esq - beyond the Murrumbidgee NRS 906 [X818]; Reel 2748-2749, Page 28 - Superintendent: Frank West. - (Ref- http://srwww.records.nsw.gov.au/indexsearch/searchhits_nocopy.aspx?table=Index to Squatters and Graziers&id=70&frm=1&query=Surname:clayton).

10 July 1839 - Clayton Benjamin - Blowering - Henry Bingham Esq - County of Murray NRS 906 [X812]; Reel 2748-2749, Page 1 - Superintendent: Richard Clee.

Dr Benjamin CLAYTON's EDUCATION.

School:

University:

Qualifications: MRCS 1828

Lic Midwifery Dublin

Speciality:

Other Occupations: William Bland (qv) as assistant (McCarthy)

To London 1826 to complete his studies

Certificate for "first ever colonial colleague"

For many years only doctor between Yass and Goulburn

1841 - CENSUS - CLAYTON, B 6 Town Gunning - [X951] - 129 2223 - (Ref- Index to 1841 Census).

The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842) Saturday 22 January 1842, page 4).From the Government Gazette. TUESDAY, JANUARY 18, 1842. - New South Wales Medical Board, Sydney, 17th January, 1842.

We undersigned, the President and Members of the New South Wales Medical Board, appointed by His Excellency the Governor under the Act 2nd Victoria, Chapter 22, intituled, An Act to define the qualifications of Medical Witnesses at Coroner's Inquests and Inquiries held before Justice in the Colony of New South Wales, do hereby certify that the undermentioned Persons has submitted the necessary - Clayton Benjamin, County King - (Ref- The Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (NSW : 1803 - 1842)(about) Previous issue Saturday 22 January 1842).

1839 - The following surgeons have been added to the list of duly qualified medical witnesses, according to Act of Council: — George Frederick Barnes, Hinton; Thomas Black, M.D. Penrith; Benjamin Clayton, County King; Alexander Cooke, Sydney; - (Ref= The Australian (Sydney, NSW : 1824 - 1848)(about) Previous issue Thursday 11 April 1839).

1939 - MEDICAL WITNESSES. New South Wales Medical Board, July 1, 1839. WE, the undersigned, the President and Members of the New South Wales Medical Board, appointed under the Act 2nd Victoria, c. 22, intituled. An Act to define the qualifications of Medical "Witnesses at Coroner's Inquests, and Inquiries held before Justices of the Peace in New South Wales," do hereby certify that up to the present date, the undermentioned persons have submitted the necessary testimonials of qualifications, viz : Benjamin Clayton, County King; - (Ref- The Colonist (Sydney, NSW : 1835 - 1840)(about) Previous issue Wednesday 10 July 1839).

Benjamin CLAYTON'S Blowering Valley experience.

How Benjamin arrived in the Blowering Valley as a single man or "Why" has not been fully established at this point or how he travelled here or with what equipment or assistance.

Index to Squatters and Graziers

1837 Clayton, Benjamin Blowrin - Evelyn Shirley Pitfield Sturt Esq - beyond the Murrumbidgee NRS 906 [X818]; Reel 2748-2749, Page 28 Superintendent: Frank West.

10 July 1839 Clayton, Benjamin Blowering - Henry Bingham Esq - County of Murray NRS 906 [X812]; Reel 2748-2749, Page 1 Superintendent: Richard Clee. - (Ref- http://srwww.records.nsw.gov.au/indexsearch/searchhits_nocopy.aspx?table=Index to Squatters and Graziers&id=70&frm=1&query=Surname:clayton).

1840 - The first "Pasturage (Squatters) Licenses issued in the Tumut area were to:- John Archer Broughton, at "Gocup" Dr Benjamin Clayton, at "Blowering", Thomas Howe, and George & William Shelley, "Tumut Plains" and George McDonald. and Mr William Warby "Darbalara"

Depasturing Licenses -

SURNAME - FIRSTNAME RESIDENCE DISTRICT SITUATION DATE OF LICENCE LICENCE COPY ITEM REMARKS SERIES

CLAYTON, B Tumut Yass (beyond) Southern 18/06/1838 0192 5067 [4/91] Other names mentioned: CLAYTON (Mr)(Snr) NRS 14363

CLAYTON, Benjamin Gunning (Near) Murrumbidgee Tumut River 08/08/1839 0240 5068 [4/92] NRS 14363

CLAYTON, Benjamin Windsor Yass (beyond) Southern 28/01/1837 0185 GvtG NRS 14363

CLAYTON, Benjamin Fish River Murrumbidgee Blowering, Tumut River 29/09/1840 0450 5070 [4/94] (28/9/40?) NRS 14363

'Surry' or 'Surrey'

TIME LINE

OTHER CLAYTON'S

To Blowering Station - To Clayton Argyle story - To Clayton Send off Speech - To Gunning List of names 1872 - To Clayton Gunning Story - To Clayton Marulan Story - To Clayton Gunning Auction - To HOME page

CLAYTON, Benjamin. Came free per "Surrey", 1816; son of Samuel Clayton, engraver 1821 Oct 30 Memorial (Fiche 3035; 4/1826 No.24). Reply, 13 Nov (Reel 6008; 4/3504A p.60) 1822 Memorial (Fiche 3043; 4/1829 No.56) - (http://colsec.records.nsw.gov.au/indexes/colsec/c/F11c_cl-col-05.htm)

SALE OF PROPERTIES

1840 - ELLIGIBLE Investment of Capital.

For sale, 'BALTINGLASS', a farm in the county of King, about two miles from the past town of Gunning, and midway between Goulburn and Yass, containing two thousand six hundred and forty-one acres, adjoining a most extensive run of Government land, which the possession of this farm commands by its improvements, at least, four miles of river frontage: it is well known to be one of the best sheep districts in the Colony.

Twenty acres are under cultivation with grain of a most promising appearance, (wheat, barley, tye, and oats) and a garden of upwaids of four acres and a half, enclosed with a paling fence, having in the coutte of it large ponds that are never dry. It contains all the choicer vegetables, and upwrds of one hundred young fruit trees, apples pears, plums, cherries, peaches, Ac , grape vines, and the minor fiuits.

A shingled cottage of eight rooms (partly finished) and verandah; also, a slabbed and shingled building of four apartments for kitchen, laundry, servants' rooms, &o.

There are on this establishment three flocks of sheep, viz_.

Four hundred and fifty ewes, of ages, with lambs at their sides

Four hundred and thirty two year old ewes, with lambs at their sides

Four hundred and thirty wethers, two and three years old, and rams

The years clip of wool will be given in with the sheep if the purchase be made beföre the end of the year.

Terms- One thousand five hundred pounds cash, and one thousand five hundred pounds secured on the land for three, five, or seven years, bearing ten per cent. interest from time of sale.

Also, an establishment at the Tumut River of upwards of two hundred and fifty head of cattle, chiefly feinalrs, with calves given in.

Thirty head of horse stick, viz,, Eight blood mares

Two two-year-old fillies Two one-year-old lillies

One three-year-old entire horse One three-year-old gelding Five yearling colts

Three saddle horses, and Eight foals

Some of the young stock have been bred from Theorem, George IV, Providence, and other excellent stallions. I

Three flocks of sheep, viz,- j

Six hundred and fifty ewes, ol' ages, with lambs given in

Five hundred maiden ewes

Four hundred wethers, one year old, and rams

This year's wool given in if the purchase is made before the end of the year.

A quantity of wheat in stack, a growing crop, the right of the stations, stockyard, enclosed paddocks, hurdle;, agricultural implements, and all the utensils of the establishment.

A team of six or eight working bullocks.

Terms-Three thousand pounds and liberal credit will be given on good set and;, r.iu! ¡Hit list charged the time of sale. For fuillttr pin tiru, luis application to be made to Janies (jutland, Esq., Hoare Town, Campbelltown, or to the undersigned. B. CLAYTON Bahinglass, Gunning, November 1st 1840. - (Ref- The Sydney Herald (NSW : 1831 - 1842)(about) Previous issue Tuesday 24 November 1840 Page 1).

HOLD UP

1840 - Frederick Kirk was indicted for shooting at William Grovenor, on the 15th January last, at Gunning, with intent to murder him; and William Chark was indicted as an accessory, aiding and abetting in the offence. It appealed the prisoners had at one time been connected with the notorious Whitton.

While robbing the house of Dr. Clayton, on the day laid in the indictment, they heard that the prosecutor had declared that if the bushrangers ventured to attack his place he would enplure them, They also learned that Mr. Grovenor had fire arms; and therefore, to see if he was guiñe enough to face them, and also to procure the arms, they declared they would pay him a visit.

The prosecutor, who is a storekeeper at Gunning, deposed that the prisoners came to his place about 3 o'clock, p. M., about the middle of January last; Clark asked for a half dozen of slurls, they were handed down, and when he turned round from doing so, the prisoner Clark clapt a pistol to his head and told me not to speak. Kirk then came armed with a short gun, and threatened to blow his brains to ribbons if resistance was offered. The family were then forced into an inner room, where they were bailed up; three hincks enuc in, who were served in the same manner; and a brickmaker and bricklayer, were brought in and bailed up also. All the parties were bailed up by Clark. Powder and arms being for sale, they then niiiiiilcd them.

Having been threatened with a visit from the bushrangers, some arms had been loaded to receive them. Mr. Grovenor reached the pisoncis down the unloaded pistols, and Kirk loaded eight orten pistols and guii--. When Mr. G. made an attempt to approach the loaded arms on the counter, Clark told him not to do that again or he would blow his brains out, and giving him a hard look, asked if his name was not Grovenor? saying "are you not the b-:-r that threatened to Like the two ol' tis?'' to «vii ¡eli he i replied " you must not believe all you hear." Thinking he was about to be shot, Air. G. said "it would be a cowardly act to shoot an unarmed man."

At this instant Mr. Alan Manning and another gentleman rode up to the door; Clark tried to cover them with his gun. Kirk was in an adjoining roam; both could see Mr. Manning. Clark said, if w.iitu bit, I'll drop hint if he comes live." Clark went out and returned npp.ircntly terrified; taking advantage of his upparciit confusion, Mr. Grovenor ran out and out with a gun, which be suit! «va. loaded with buck shot; he asked him for a ball, but he had none; being rendered desperate on account of his family being in the power of the bushrangers, Mr. G. rammed his pen knife into the gun, returned and challenged them to come out, but they would not.

Clark presented his double barrelled gun at Mr. G. from behind the shutter, when he withdrew a small distance- Clark and Mr. Grovenor exchanged shots but without effect; the ball passed very near Mr. G.'s face, when he ordered Chark to surrender, but he would not saying he never was born to be hanged. Mr. Manning having returned with assistance from Mr. Hume's, and fearing if a rush were made into the house that some one or more would be shot, it was arranged for a party to get up to the roof and remove the brick work there.

A man named Cooper went up with a pistol, but as soon as he had reached the joists he was fired at by Clark. The shot struck the cannister of gunpowder out of his hand while in the act of priming his pistol. Mr. Grovenor then went up when Clark fired and shot him through the hat; the ball struck the joist and splintered it so that he was struck on the forehead and stunned; the ball just grazed the forehead; the firing lusted for about two hours, and seventeen or eighteen shots were exchanged between Clark und Mr. Grovenor.

Kirk was employed loading for Chark. At least one of Mr. G's: shots lodged in the wall close by the side of Clark's head, and a splinter wounding Mr. G.'s sister-in-law in the neck, on which they immediately said they would surrender. The party then entered, secured the prisoners, and conveyed them to Yass. His Honor highly praised the courageous conduct of Mr. Grovenor.

John Toft, unsigned to Dr. Clayton, deposed, that on the morning of their capture, the two prisoners robbed Dr. Clayton's house and left that for the prosecutors, declaring their intentions to be as already stated. After they left his masters premises he got armed, went to Grovenor's, and assisted at the capture of the prisoners. Mr. Manning, junior, and the driver of the Yass mail, also . corroborated the prosecutor's evidence. Guilty-To be transported for Life. - (Ref- The Sydney Herald (NSW : 1831 - 1842)(about) Previous issue Wednesday 6 May 1840). 10. A Brief History of the Canberra District

Brian Johnston

McKellar Ridge Wines

Introduction

The history of the establishment of grape-growing and winemaking in what is now known as the Canberra District is a story in two parts. The first relates to pioneering efforts of various property owners who grew grapes in the Yass–Gunning area following the opening up of pastoral land for grazing in the area in the early 1820s. The second relates to the establishment of commercial vineyards in the area surrounding the Australian Capital Territory in the early 1970s and the establishment of the Canberra District as we now know it.

It is worth recalling the very early history of grape-growing in Australia. The first commercial vineyard in Australia was the Rose Hill vineyard established at Parramatta from cuttings brought to Australia by Governor Phillip on the First Fleet. In 1791 there were reported to be 3 acres (1.2 ha) of vines growing at Rose Hill. Grape-growing slowly spread as new settlers arrived, some with grape-growing experience. Captain John Macarthur established Camden Park in the early 1820s with more than 8 ha of vines, and that property subsequently played an important role in the importation and distribution of vine cuttings throughout New South Wales and the Barossa Valley.

Early Plantings in the Yass–Gunning Area

The first recorded planting of vines in the Yass–Gunning area was made by Dr Benjamin Clayton, who established a property called Baltinglass in the mid 1830s. He trained for medical practice in Sydney and travelled to London for his medical exams, completing a Certificate of Surgery with the Royal College in May 1828. Following his marriage to Fanny Broughton in 1835, he took up land at Baltinglass about 2 km outside Gunning where he also operated as the local doctor for nearly 20 years. By the mid 1840s, the property was highly regarded, having sheep, cattle and grapevines, as well as a substantive house. It is reported that he cultivated every variety of grape known and experimented in producing wine. He is reported to have produced an excellent Gunning wine Proceedings of the 7th University House Wine Symposium 36 that was awarded a medal in France, although details of this award have yet to be fully described. A watercolour of the property made in 1866 shows several acres of vines. Dr Clayton was not the only Yass–Gunning grape-growing pioneer. Others included John Hardy, who planted grapes at Hardwicke near Yass, Hamilton Hume at Cooma Cottage, Robert Campbell, a Sydney merchant and large landowner who established a small vineyard at Duntroon in the 1860s, as well as a number of others.

Helm and Cambourne (1999) report that records from the Colonial Secretary’s Office show that by 1858 there were 5 ha of vines planted to wine grapes in the County of King (including Yass), producing 1660 gallons (7550 L) of wine and 230 gallons (1000 L) of brandy. However, Helm and Cambourne reported that wine production in the district by 1908 had become uneconomic, with the last winery, Ainsbury near Yass, closing its doors in that year. This was due to a combination factors including the activities of the Temperance Movement reducing consumption, the depression of 1893 and the flood of wine from South Australia and Victoria that followed Federation in 1901.

The Resurgence of the Canberra District

A resurgence of interest in grape-growing in the district occurred with the establishment of Canberra as the nation’s capital and the influx of new families. The first known vineyard in the ACT was established by the Forner family, when Clem Forner moved from Griffith in 1925 to work in the ACT and took up an orchard lease at Narrabundah. (Interestingly, Clem was a friend of the De Bortoli family who established the wine empire at Griffith.) The vineyard at Narrabundah comprised about 1.2 ha and grew both red and white grapes, the family making what were described as ‘Chablis’ and ‘Cabernet’ style wines. It was only when the ACT Government began resuming leases for housing in the late 1950s that the vineyard was removed.

The Scientific Pioneers

By the mid 1960s, Canberra was a thriving city with many fine academic institutions, including The Australian National University, the John Curtin School of Medical Research and the CSIRO. It is from these institutions that the rebirth of the Canberra District, as we now know it, was to come.

Four names initially stand out: Dr Edgar Riek and Ken Helm, both from CSIRO Division of Entomology, Dr John Kirk from the CSIRO Division of Plant Industry and the lesser known Dr Max Blake from the John Curtin School of Medical 10. A Brief History of the Canberra District

37 - Research. Evidence gathered during the preparation of our book Wines of the Canberra District: Coming of age (2011) has revealed an interesting time line of early plantings and subsequent commercial production. Dr Riek, who has a passion for fine wines and fine food, was the first Cellar Master for the Canberra Food and Wine Club in 1953. He also knew a number of Rutherglen and Milawa winemakers well, including Mick Morris and the Brown brothers, becoming involved in Muscat maturation trials and wine judging at the Rutherglen Wine Show in the early 1960s. He decided Canberra had the climate for growing grapes and thought he would put his skills to the test. He acquired a set of grape cuttings from the CSIRO Merbein Research Station in 1966 and planted them in his garden in Ainslie. In 1967 these were planted out on a friend’s property at Sutton. When he returned from overseas at the end of 1968, he was disappointed to find the cuttings were doing poorly due to the harsh summer conditions. This led to the search for a better site.

Luckily, his wife had spotted a number of blocks for sale on the edge of Lake George, about 50 km north of Canberra. Edgar was familiar with the microclimate of the area, having driven past the site in the middle of winter over the years. He had noticed the ‘warmer’ conditions on the edge of Lake George, as the car windows defrosted when he drove by. In November 1970 the ‘Cullarin’ site was purchased and it has proved to be warmer than Canberra by an average of 2ºC during winter. With good drainage and a natural spring, Cullarin proved to be an excellent grape-growing site. Dr Riek planted the first half-acre of grapes in 1971, using a rotary hoe to prepare the site and planting vegetables—sweet corn, tomatoes and beans—between the rows to assist with family self-sufficiency. A 100-year-old slab hut was renovated to provide shelter during vintage, and plantings gradually expanded. The early grapes were planted without the benefit of drip irrigation and usually took four years before they bore significant fruit.

Also in 1968, while Dr Riek was facing the disappointment of the poor establishment of his cuttings at Sutton, Dr Max Blake was having more success on his property near Bungendore, where a trial plot of 100 vines was successfully established (Helm and Cambourne 1999). This site was subsequently abandoned and he went on to establish a 4 ha vineyard at nearby Brooks Creek in 1973, which he named Shingle House.

The year 1971 has also proven to be a significant year in the re-establishment of the Canberra District for a second reason: Dr Kirk and his family planted the first vines at Clonakilla, a property on the outskirts of Murrumbateman. One hectare of vines was planted in 1971—Cabernet Sauvignon and Riesling.

Dr Kirk initially planted the vines on a relatively low area of the property and they grew well in the first year, which was relatively wet. This encouraged him

Proceedings of the 7th University House Wine Symposium 38 to expand his plantings to 1.5 ha the following season. The summer of 1972–73 was a shock—a drought had arrived—and, without irrigation, many of the vines were severely water stressed and many died. Some of the first plantings, which were at the bottom of the hill, received some moisture from the ground and survived, but most of the new, second-year plantings and the first died, leaving about 0.5 ha under vines. The dry, hot summers also encouraged the brown grasshoppers to feed on the young vines, causing further damage, along with that from rabbits and cockatoos. Despite these setbacks and with the advent of drip irrigation, by 1978, the vineyard was eventually well established further up the slopes of the property. In 1973 five more growers began to establish vineyards in the district (Table 1). Table 1 Development of the First Canberra District Vineyards, 1971–86. Vineyard Developer Year grapes were first planted Cullarin Cellars (later renamed Lake George Wines) Dr Edgar Riek 1971 Clonakilla Dr John Kirk 1971 Nanima Creek Vineyard (now known as Helm Wines) Ken Helm 1973 Doonkuna Estate Wing Commander Harvey Smith 1973 Broughton Park (now known as Murrumbateman Wines) Geoff and Trish Middleton 1973 Westering Vineyard (now Lake George Wines) Captain Geoff Hood 1973 Shingle House (later known as Brooks Creek) Dr Max Blake 1973 Affleck Vineyard Dr Ian and Susie Hendry 1976 Telofa (now known as Yass Valley Wines) Peter Griffith 1978 Lark Hill Dr Dave and Sue Carpenter 1978 Benfield Estate (near Yass, no longer operational) David and Lanette Fetherston 1979 Appletree Hill Vineyard, Queanbeyan (no longer exists) Dr David Madew, sr 1980 Jeir Creek Rob and Kay Howell 1984 Ruker Wines (now Linberi Park) Rick Ruker 1984 Mamre (now Kyeema Vineyard) Ron McKenzie 1985 Brindabella Hills Dr Roger and Faye Harris 1986 Pankhurst Allan and Christine Pankhurst 1986 Park Lane (now Surveyors Hill) Alwyn Lane 1986 Source: Helm (1979); Helm and Cambourne (1999); author’s own research. 10. A Brief History of the Canberra District 39

In 1973, Ken Helm, who went on to be a particularly outstanding producer of Riesling wine in the district, planted his first vines at his Nanima Creek vineyard—the same year as Wing Commander Harvey Smith planted Doonkuna, Geoff and Trish Middleton planted Broughton Park, Captain Geoff Hood planted Westering Vineyard and, as noted, Dr Max Blake planted Shingle House. One of the features of the establishment of the Canberra District in the post-1971 era has been the willingness to learn and share with each other. The inaugural meeting of the Canberra District Winegrowers’ Association, attended by seven people, was held at Dr Riek’s home in November 1974. It was decided to form the association to further exchange information and experiences on grape-growing and winemaking in the area and the association became active during 1975.

The Early Wines

Also in 1975 Dr Riek made his first wine, which included small volumes of red and white varieties. This was shared with friends and wine industry contacts, being bottled as ‘Cullarin Cellars’. He visited France on a number of occasions, taking particular note of grape-growing and winemaking practices in Burgundy to see what he could apply at Cullarin. The first wines sold commercially in the modern era were made by Dr John Kirk at the family’s Clonakilla property in 1976. These first wines were a white wine blend of Riesling and Sauvignon Blanc and a red wine of Cabernet Sauvignon and Shiraz, both produced in small quantities. Dr Kirk sourced some fruit from Doonkuna to help make these wines. Ken Helm made a Riesling in 1977 and in 1978 he combined with Geoff Middleton to make more small batches of wine. The 1977 Helm Riesling won First Prize in the 1977 Forbes Wine Show—the first wine show medal from the district in the modern era. The following year, also using additional fruit from Doonkuna, they combined to produce 3000 bottles of wine. A Riesling was subsequently offered for sale at the 1979 ANU Wine Symposium organised by the late Jim Murphy (of Murphy Cellars). It was attended by industry leaders including Wolf Blass and Max Schubert, the developer of Grange Hermitage. The Riesling was received with considerable enthusiasm by the delegates and utilised a special Canberra District Vignerons Association label. The Helm Riesling went on to win further prizes in the 1978 and 1979 Forbes Wine shows, winning Champion Dry White in 1978 and First Prize in 1979. The 1978 Riesling also won First Prize in the Canberra National Show (Amateur Winemakers). Proceedings of the 7th University House Wine Symposium 40

A number of the early Clonakilla wines were also entered in the Forbes Wine Show with considerable success. Also in 1978, three red wines received more than 17 points out of twenty. In 1979, the 1977 Cabernet Shiraz from Clonakilla was judged Best Red Wine of the Show and Clonakilla also won the port class. At the same 1979 Forbes Show, the Helm–Middleton Chardonnay won Best Dry White, Dr Riek won the Rose and Sauterne classes and Helm–Middleton won Best 1979 Dry Red for their Cabernet Shiraz. These early successes gave great heart to the pioneering winemakers and, with greater awareness of potential and interest, a further 11 vineyards were planted between 1976 and 1986 (see Table 1). Two of these early vineyards are now gone: Benefield Estate near Yass and Appletree Hill Vineyard in Queanbeyan, which was subsequently used for housing. Shingle House Vineyard (now known as Brooks Creek) is now being revitalised by the owners of Little Bridge Wines, after being effectively abandoned for a number of years.

Great Wines from Diverse Sites

As outlined in our chapter ‘Award winning wines’ in the new edition of the book Wines of the Canberra District: Coming of age, many wines from across diverse sites are now achieving the highest level of quality and success. The successful varietal range is expanding with Chardonnay, Tempranillo, Sangiovese, Cabernet, Merlot, Voignier, Semillon/Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Gris and Gruner Veltliner all winning gold medals in recent years. The analysis indicates more than 200 gold and trophy medals have been awarded to Canberra District wines in the past five years—an average of more than 40 a year. In an interesting coincidence, it is also 40 years since Dr Riek and Dr Kirk planted their first commercial vines in 1971. On the basis of this evidence, it seems eminently fair to conclude that the district has truly ‘come of age’.

References

Helm, K., 1979, ‘Cool climate grape growing’, in Wine Talk, Acton Press, Canberra.

Helm, K. and Cambourne, B., 1999, ‘Canberra District: the cool climate wine capital’, Australian Wine Industry Journal, vol. 16, no. 6. Johnston, B. and Johnson, J., 2011, Wines of the Canberra District: Coming of age, 3R Operations, Canberra. - (Ref- http://archiver.rootsweb.ancestry.com/th/read/AUSTRALIA/1998-12/0912503415). Near Relatives of Benjamin CLAYTON Relationship Person Born Birth Place Died Death Place Age Father in Law William BROUGHTON Nov 1768 Chatham, Kent, England 20 Jul 1821 Appin, New South Wales, Australia 52 Mother in Law Elizabeth Charlotte KENNEDY 1783 Nettlestead, Kent England 20 Dec 1843 Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia 60 Self Benjamin CLAYTON Wife Frances Matilda BROUGHTON 1814 New South Wales, Australia 1893 Burwood, New South Wales, Australia 79 Son Benjamin CLAYTON 23 Dec 1837 New South Wales, Australia 1926 Murrumburrah, New South Wales, Australia 89 Daughter Frances Eliza CLAYTON 1841 New South Wales, Australia 1925 Bowral, New South Wales, Australia 84 Daughter Emma Johnson CLAYTON 1843 New South Wales, Australia 1919 Campbelltown, New South Wales, Australia 76 Son Broughton G CLAYTON 1845 New South Wales, Australia 1854 New South Wales, Australia 9 Son Kennedy CLAYTON 1846 New South Wales, Australia 1935 Yass, New South Wales, Australia 89 Daughter Bland CLAYTON 1848 New South Wales, Australia 1936 Campbelltown, New South Wales, Australia 88 Daughter Margaret J CLAYTON 1851 New South Wales, Australia 1932 Campbelltown, New South Wales, Australia 81 Daughter Ultima CLAYTON 1853 New South Wales, Australia 1936 Campbelltown, New South Wales, Australia 83 Daughter in Law Maryanna Mackay GARLAND 09 Apr 1853 Lochinvar, New South Wales, Australia 08 Dec 1920 Harden, New South Wales, Australia 67 Son in Law James Robert GARLAND 1840 New South Wales, Australia 1915 Burwood, New South Wales, Australia 75 Son in Law John Kennedy HUME Granddaughter Irene Francis CLAYTON 1877 Yass, New South Wales, Australia 1971 St Leonards, New South Wales, Australia 94 Grandson Benjamin H CLAYTON 1878 Murrumburrah, New South Wales, Australia 1935 New South Wales, Australia 57 Granddaughter Aileen Emma CLAYTON 1879 Murrumburrah, New South Wales, Australia 1974 New South Wales, Australia 95 Granddaughter Minnie Garland CLAYTON 1881 Murrumburrah, New South Wales, Australia 1976 New South Wales, Australia 95 Granddaughter Kathleen Mair CLAYTON 1886 Murrumburrah, New South Wales, Australia 1972 St Leonards, New South Wales, Australia 86 Granddaughter Carol Broughton CLAYTON 1891 Murrumburrah, New South Wales, Australia 1967 St Leonards, New South Wales, Australia 76 Grandson Gladstone John Garland CLAYTON 1893 Murrumburrah, New South Wales, Australia 29 Jul 1918 France 25 Grandson Milton Samuel CLAYTON 1897 Murrumburrah, New South Wales, Australia Grandson James B R GARLAND 1902 Ashfield, New South Wales, Australia Granddaughter Emma Hay GARLAND 1873 Wagga Wagga, New South Wales, Australia 1908 St Leonards, New South Wales, Australia 35 Nephew Thomas B CARNE 1816 New South Wales, Australia Niece Elizabeth S CARNE 1818 New South Wales, Australia Nephew Joseph W CARNE 1822 New South Wales, Australia Nephew Charles Frederick SMITH 10 Nov 1834 Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia 21 Oct 1915 Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia 80 Nephew James Robert GARLAND 1840 New South Wales, Australia 1915 Burwood, New South Wales, Australia 75 Nephew Thomas Archer Sparling GARLAND 1842 New South Wales, Australia 1937 Tamworth, New South Wales, Australia 95 Nephew William John GARLAND 1844 New South Wales, Australia 1935 Tamworth, New South Wales, Australia 91 Niece Eliza Jane GARLAND 1845 New South Wales, Australia 1936 Tamworth, New South Wales, Australia 91 Niece Isabella Catherine GARLAND 1847 New South Wales, Australia 1924 Tamworth, New South Wales, Australia 77 Nephew Frances Marion GARLAND 1848 New South Wales, Australia 1933 Tamworth, New South Wales, Australia 85 Nephew Broughton Clayton GARLAND 09 Nov 1850 Tooma, New South Wales, Australia 11 Apr 1934 Mosman, New South Wales, Australia 83 Nephew Edward Adam GARLAND abt 1853 New South Wales, Australia 1914 Chatswood, New South Wales, Australia 61 Niece Emma GARLAND 1855 New South Wales, Australia 1928 Tamworth, New South Wales, Australia 73 Nephew George Benjamin GARLAND 1857 Concord, New South Wales, Australia 1938 Moree, New South Wales, Australia 81 Nephew Kennedy Theodore GARLAND 1859 Concord, New South Wales, Australia 07 Dec 1902 Tamworth, New South Wales, Australia 43 Nephew Henry Bingham BROUGHTON 16 Jan 1845 New South Wales, Australia 05 Mar 1902 Mosman, New South Wales, Australia 57 Nephew John Archer BROUGHTON 03 Jun 1847 New South Wales, Australia 19 Jul 1862 Tumut, New South Wales, Australia 15 Nephew William Robert BROUGHTON 1848 New South Wales, Australia Niece Blakeney BROUGHTON 1850 New South Wales, Australia 1911 Brewarrina, New South Wales, Australia 61 Niece Grace Helena BROUGHTON 1854 New South Wales, Australia Nephew James Gordon BROUGHTON 1856 Tumut, New South Wales, Australia Aug 1862 Tumut, New South Wales, Australia 6 Niece Isabelle (Ida) Gertrude BROUGHTON 1859 Tumut, New South Wales, Australia 1937 Toorak, Victoria, Australia 78 Nephew Lachlan Wentworth BROUGHTON 1861 Tumut, New South Wales, Australia 1942 Tumut, New South Wales, Australia 81 Niece Mabel BROUGHTON 06 Jul 1863 Tumut, New South Wales, Australia 05 Aug 1919 Toorak, Victoria, Australia 56 Niece Frances Kennedy BROUGHTON 1866 Deniliquin, New South Wales, Australia 1946 Woollahra, New South Wales, Australia 80 Niece Beatrice Emma BROUGHTON 06 Jun 1869 Deniliquin, New South Wales, Australia 22 Sep 1932 Woollahra, New South Wales, Australia 63 Nephew James H E BROUGHTON 1861 Tumut, New South Wales, Australia 1935 Tumut, New South Wales, Australia 74 Sister in Law Mary Ann BROUGHTON 27 Feb 1793 Parramatta, New South Wales, Australia 1872 Burwood, New South Wales, Australia 79 Sister in Law Sarah BROUGHTON 14 Sep 1799 26 Dec 1838 Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia 39 Brother in Law William Henry BROUGHTON 15 May 1802 Norfolk Island 05 Sep 1858 Boorowa, New South Wales, Australia 56 Sister in Law Rebecca BROUGHTON 05 Sep 1804 Norfolk Island 1888 Sydney, New South Wales, Australia 84 Sister in Law Elizabeth Isabella BROUGHTON 04 Feb 1807 Sydney, New South Wales, Australia 14 Jan 1891 Moss Vale, New South Wales, Australia 83 Brother in Law James Gordon BROUGHTON 22 Oct 1811 23 Jan 1833 21 Sister in Law Emma Carne BROUGHTON 1815 New South Wales, Australia 1893 Tamworth, New South Wales, Australia 78 Brother in Law John Archer BROUGHTON 11 Dec 1818 Sydney, New South Wales, Australia 25 Dec 1878 South Yarra, Victoria, Australia 60 Brother in Law Robert Kennedy BROUGHTON 06 Aug 1820 New South Wales, Australia 08 Sep 1876 Tumut, New South Wales, Australia 56 Events in Benjamin CLAYTON's life Date Age Event Place Notes Src 1834 Married Frances Matilda BROUGHTON (aged 20) New South Wales, Australia V18341328 18/1834 23 Dec 1837 Birth of son Benjamin CLAYTON New South Wales, Australia 1841 Birth of daughter Frances Eliza CLAYTON New South Wales, Australia V18411645 25A/1841 1843 Birth of daughter Emma Johnson CLAYTON New South Wales, Australia V18431599 27A/1843 1845 Birth of son Broughton G CLAYTON New South Wales, Australia V18451970 30A/1845 1846 Birth of son Kennedy CLAYTON New South Wales, Australia V18461647 32A/1846 1848 Birth of daughter Bland CLAYTON New South Wales, Australia V18481821 34A/1848 1851 Birth of daughter Margaret J CLAYTON New South Wales, Australia V18512066 37A/1851 1853 Birth of daughter Ultima CLAYTON New South Wales, Australia V1853763 40/1853 1854 Death of son Broughton G CLAYTON (aged 9) New South Wales, Australia V1854800 41A/1854, age 10 1893 Death of wife Frances Matilda BROUGHTON (aged 79) Burwood, New South Wales, Australia 1919 Death of daughter Emma Johnson CLAYTON (aged 76) Campbelltown, New South Wales, Australia 23372/1919 1925 Death of daughter Frances Eliza CLAYTON (aged 84) Bowral, New South Wales, Australia 9130/1925 1926 Death of son Benjamin CLAYTON (aged 89) Murrumburrah, New South Wales, Australia 5794/1926 1932 Death of daughter Margaret J CLAYTON (aged 81) Campbelltown, New South Wales, Australia 9380/1932, not married 1935 Death of son Kennedy CLAYTON (aged 89) Yass, New South Wales, Australia 2336/1935 1936 Death of daughter Bland CLAYTON (aged 88) Campbelltown, New South Wales, Australia Note 1 1936 Death of daughter Ultima CLAYTON (aged 83) Campbelltown, New South Wales, Australia Note 2 Note 1: 3661/1936, not married (if female) Note 2: 8896/1936, not married if female - (Ref- http://www.bellsite.id.au/gdbtree/HTMLFiles/HTMLFiles_07/P10653.html).

CLAYTON.-In loving'memory of our dear mother, Elisabeth Clayton, who departed til!« life April 6th, ipil, nt Bowral. Good was lier dear heart, and in frfcndship sound, Patient in pain, and loved by all around. A belter mother never dwelt on this earth, Nor proved to her children a true .mother's worth. Inserted by her loving 6on and daughter-in-law, Ben. and Mary Clayton. - (Ref- The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954)(about) Previous issue Saturday 6 April 1912 Page 14.)