Timothy (1st) & Bridget Quilty

Timothy QUILTY & Bridget Halloran.

"Riverview"

Jone's Bridge

Tumut. NSW

Property Details:

Zone - Rural

Portion 34 - 50

Portion 9 - 50

Portion 10 - 50

Acres - About 150

Resumed by the NSW State Government - 1966

BIRTH of Timothy QUILTY

1ST MARRIAGES of Timothy QUILTY

1884 Mr Timothy (1st) QUILTY, married Miss Bridget HALLORAN,(Halcoran) in TUMUT, NSW, - (Ref:- NSW BDM No. 7225/1884) the daughter of Patrick & Bridget HALLORAN (Halcoran).

Bridget's DEATH

1885 unfortunatelty Bridget QUILTY died in Tumut. (Ref:- NSW BDM No. 14700/1885). After the birth of first child.

CHILDREN

1. 1885 Thomas (2nd) QUILTY, parents TIMOTHY (1st) & BRIDGET in TUMUT, NSW - (Ref- NSW BDM 33551/1885).

PROPERTY PURCHASE

1886 Mr Timothy (1st) Quilty purchased the "Riverview" property, which is situated on the Blowering Road, at Jone's Bridge, Tumut, from Mr Thomas Bridle.

2ND MARRIAGE

1888 Timothy (1st) QUILTY, remarried this time to Miss Margaret A BOURKE, daughter of Mr & Mrs F Bourke of East Blowering, in Tumut, NSW - (Ref:- NSW BDM 7434/1888). The Bourke family property was situated about 2 miles further up the Tumut River in East Blowering.

CHILDREN

1. 34810/1891 QUILTY, MARY parents TIMOTHY & MARGARET A in TUMUT

2. 35343/1892 QUILTY, WILLIAM D parents TIMOTHY & MARGARET A in TUMUT = BLOWERING. Mr and Mrs T. Quilty, of " River view," Blowering have had news that their son, Capt Dr W. D. Quilty, was awarded the Military Cross for work done under fire with the stretoher bearers at an advanced dressing post.

3. The Military Cross recipient was educated at Blowering public sohool. From there he prooeeded to St. Patrick's College, Goulbarn, and was "Dux" in 1910. He took out his degree as Batchelor of Medicine at Sydney University and was immediately appointed house doctor to the Mater Miaericordin Hospital, Brisbane.

After passing through Enoggera Military Camp, Brisbane, he proceeded to England, where be did a large amount of hospital work before being appointed to the front. His brother, Signaller Prank Quilty, is a few miles distant in France.

4. 16527/1898 QUILTY, STANLEY T B parents TIMOTHY & MARGARET A in TUMUT. He died in 1898 QUILTY, STANLEY T B in TUMUT - (Ref- NSW BDM 7333/1898). - (Ref- The Tumut Advocate and Farmers & Settlers' Adviser (NSW : 1903 - 1925)(about) Previous issue Tuesday 19 March 1918 Page 2).

Thomas Quilty

Ann Hayes

Thomas Quilty was born in 1786 in Shanagolden Co.Limerick.

Ann Hayes was born abt1799 in Shanagolden Co.Limerick.

They married in 1817 Limerick.

Thomas and Ann arrived per "Aliquis" 16/3/1839 with Children

Thomas (20 Carpenter)

Mary 16,

Johanna 14,

Margaret 12, - Margaret married Robert Downing (1st).

Michael 10, -

Michael and

Ann 7 and

Edward 7months. - Edward held licences of the Tumut and Woolpack Inns respectively.

Their eldest daughter Ellen had married Jeremiah Kennelly 5/10/1838 just before they left and did not accompany them.

On arrival in Australia the family made their way to Gobarralong area where they appeared to stay for a few years before settling on the Gilmore Creek.

Thomas later bought blocks in Tumut after its relocation following the disastrous floods of 1852. His assets provided him with a comfortable living in his old age.

In electrol roll of 1859 Thomas Jnr appeared as a freeholder at Bombowlee and younger boys

All except Michael remained in the area for the rest of their lives marrying into local families.

Johanna's first husband was Timothy O'Mara from Tipperary who commenced the first public house The Woolpack together with his brother-in-law Robert Downing.

He bought Rosebank estate, held a squatters licence (partnership with hisbrother-in-law John McNamara) for 40,000 acres at the head of the Gilmore and owned 1090 acres at the junction of the Goobraganda and Tumut rivers. On Timothy's death 1860, Johanna married John Henry Cassidy, an American miner.

Her brother had already taken over the licence of The Woolpack but died aged 23 following combined effects from a fall off a horse and a fist fight in which he was knocked out.

Following a letter from Thomas (1st) in 1851 Ellen and her husband Jeremiah Kennelly and five children joined the family and had a further 7 children in Australia, they settled in Lacmalac where Jeremiah donated land for the first school. Although Jeremiah and Ellen were late in emigrating, the discovery of gold at Lacmalac is credited with assisting them to early prosperity.

In the late 1850's the Quilty family headed the list of donors to the fund to build Tumut's first catholic church.

Thomas Quilty died 5/16/1870 Tumut and Ann Quilty died 1/2/1881 Tumut - Both buried in the Pioneer Cemetery.

8 children of Thomas and Ann Quilty

Mr Tim Quilty of 'Riverview' West Blowering, had another bad turn early in the week and was brought into the Tumut Hospital. The changeable weather of late has affected his health a great deal since he returned home from Lewisham Hospital. - (Ref- Adelong and Tumut Express and Tumbarumba Post (NSW : 1900 - 1925)(about) Previous issue Friday 7 September 1917 Page 3).

Margaret married Robert Downing (1st).THE day their father died, Jessica and Tom Quilty were told his former girlfriend intended to claim against his $1.5 million estate, even though his will named his two children as his only beneficiaries.

NEWSPAPER

Ms Quilty said she was upset and angry. ''It felt so inappropriate My brother and I haven't had time to mourn our father.''

That was nine months ago and so far the estate has spent $22,000 in legal fees.

The father's properties have fallen into disrepair and assets have been sold to pay the mounting debts. ''The estate is in limbo. She has 12 months to lay a claim,'' Ms Quilty, 24, said.

Now the family is lobbying to change the laws governing who can claim on estates - and how.

Graham Quilty, 60, died last July. He had been divorced for 17 years but in 2004 met a new girlfriend - a mother of four who was 20 years his junior.

They lived together in Tumut from late 2008 to late 2009. ''Last time I heard it didn't work out and she moved to Queensland,'' Ms Quilty said.

But the woman, who cannot be named for legal reasons, said the relationship continued and that Mr Quilty had been living with her in Noosa while working at a Tumut business he was trying to sell.

Ms Quilty said their father had told them about his will and assured them they had ''nothing to worry about''. Contesting a claim against the estate could cost up to $100,000, she said.

''We had no idea of the laws and he had no idea of the laws,'' she said.

A specialist estate barrister, David Liebhold, said people were often shocked. ''They have never heard of it that someone can challenge the will simply on the basis that they feel they should get something.''

Pam Suttor, the chairwoman of the NSW Law Society's elder law and succession committee, said the public had much to learn. ''The problem often is that the deceased didn't exercise that proper objective judgment was adequate provision made?

''You need wise testators and wise legal advisers,'' she said.

Ms Quilty said her father's former girlfriend had been receiving a single-parent payment.

The woman has also lodged a claim on Mr Quilty's superannuation fund, which had failed to name any beneficiaries.

''I think we will win the case. It is just unfair that we will have to go through the whole process,'' Ms Quilty said.

Thomas and Ann Quilty

Thomas Quilty was born in 1786 in Shanagolden, County Limerick, Ireland. Ann Hayes was born abt. 1799 in Shanagolden, County, Limerick, Ireland. They married in 1817 County Limerick..

Thomas and Ann arrived per the "Aliquis" on 16th March 1839 with children Thomas (20 a carpenter), Mary 16, Johanna 14, Margaret 12, Michael 10, Ann 7 and Edward 7 months. Their eldest daughter Ellen had married Jeremiah Kennelly on 5 October, 1838 just before they left and did not accompany them..

On arrival in Australia the family made their way to the Gobarralong area where they appeared to stay for a few years before settling on the Gilmore Creek. Thomas later bought blocks in Tumut after it's relocation following the disasterous floods of 1852. His assets provided him with a comfortable living in his old age..

In electoral rolls of 1859 Thomas Jr. appeared as a freeholder at Bombowlee and younger boys Michael and Edward held licences of The Tumut and Woolpack Inns respectively. All except Michael remained in the area for the rest of their lives, marrying into local families..

Margaret married Robert Downing Sr., Johanna's first husband was Timothy O'Mara from Tipperary who commenced the first public house The Woolpack together with his brother-in-law Robert Downing. He bought "Rosebank Estate", held a squatters licence (partnership with his brother-in-law John McNamara) for 40,000 acres at the head of the Gilmore and owned 1,090 acres at the junction of the Goobraganda and Tumut Rivers. On Timothy's death in 1860, Johanna married John Henry Cassidy, an American miner..

Her brother Edward had already taken over the licence of The Woolpack but died aged 23 following combined effects from a fall off a horse and a fist fight in which he was knocked out..

Following a letter from her father Thomas in 1851 Ellen and her husband Jeremiah Kennelly and 5 children joined the family and had a further 7 children in Australia. They settled in Lacmalac where Jeremiah donated land for the first school..

Although Jeremiah and Ellen were late in emigrating, the discovery of gold at Lacmalac is credited with assisting them to early prosperity..

In the late 1850's the Quilty family headed the list of donors to the fund to build Tumut's first Catholic Church. Thomas Quilty died on 16th May 1870 in Tumut, Ann Quilty died 1st February, 1888 in Tumut. Both are buried in the Pioneer Cemetery

1903 - Robert James Downing was born in Tumut. He died in Sydney in 1958.

This page is under construction, please contact John on 02 42848890 or johnstephenson@acnrep.com with any additional information. 0

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1957 - Greg Davy ?Lost Tumut Friday the 16.10.15

Photo

Tumut Convent 1957 5 stone 7lbs Team, Back Row L to R Col Hargeaves,Cliff Quilty,Michael Bristow, Third Row L tio R John SchafferJohn Patton,Doug Williamson,Phillip Barrycotter,James Roberts,Barry Watson,Matt Hughes, Second Row; ken Deavonport,Doug Crampton,Robert Masters,John lavis,Garry Mcdonald,Kevin Cowan, Front Row: David Arnoult,Greg Davy,

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TUMUT POLICE COURT.Thursday, May 25. (Before the Police Magistrate.)

Arson. Thomas Curry, on remand, was brought up on suspicion of having on the 20th instant, set fire to a shed on Mr. Michael Quilty's farm at Lacmalac, u hereby property, to the value of ,1000 was destroyed.

The accused was defended by Mr. Robertson. Sub-inspector O'Neill conducted the prosecution.

Richard Creaghe, sworn, deposed : I am senior-sergeant of police stationed at Tumut; from information received I apprehended Curry at Blowering, on suspicion, last Monday; when I did so he said "All right, I'll come with you; I'm as innocent as a child".

Previous to this I asked him if he had heard the news, and he replied, "No, what was it ?" I told him Quilty's place at Lacmalac was burned down.

He said, "I don't know where Lacmalac is ; I never heard of such a place; I never knew that Quilty had a farm." This conversation did not take place at the time of arrest; it was on the Sunday.

When I told him about the reward he said "I didn't burn it; how could I when I was at Blowering?" I said nothing to elicit such a remark.

Upon arresting him I asked to see the boots he wore in Tumut on the Friday previous. He pointed to those he had on and said, "These are them."

I took off the right boot and measured it, because I noticed a peculiarity in a track of the right boot in the ploughed ground.

I then allowed him to put it on again, but on Tuesday I took the boot to Quilty's farm, laid it on the tracks, and found it to correspond in length, breadth, and peculiar impression.

We examined the track in several places and found the boot to correspond. I was accompanied by Quilty, John Howe, and constable Johnson.

The track first began about fifteen yards from the burnt shed in the direction of Vickery's. We lost the tracks when we got near Vickery's, but after hunting about we found them again at the corner of the paddock, close to a gate leading towards the Blowering Road.

The boot now produced is the same I have referred to. At one of the gates we found an impression of a boot-tip.Cross examined : When I addressed accused on Sunday I was in plain clothes, but he knew me having seen me often before.

He said he had never been far above Mrs. Shelley's. People coming from Vickery's would pass through the gate. There is a choice of roads. The peculiarity of the boot is that it is a little down on the outside.

From Blowering House to Quilty's farm is about six miles. Some people wear their boots down on the inside.

By the Bench: The soil had been recently ploughed, but the ground was too dry to detect the marks of nails; the heel-tip was not distinctly visible. I could not say the track at the gate was the same.

Michael Quilty, sworn, deposed: I am an Inn-Keeper at Tumut; I have a farm at Tumut Plain, about five miles from town. On the farm I had a shed in which were nearly 12,000 bushels of wheat, a ten horse-power threshing machine, a dray, and other farming implements.

I was there on Wednesday the 17th instant, storing the wheat in the shed. All was safe when I left that night. About three o'clock on Saturday morning John Howe, who resides on the farm, came and told me that the shed had been set on fire.

I went out with the Police and found his statement correct. Curry was at my house on the Friday, and remained there till about four o'clock.

George Moore was there at the time, he and accused had a quarrel in the bar; Curry hit at Moore with a loaded stock whip handle, but missed him. Moore then knocked him down, and I said it served him right for attempting to use such a weapon.

They separated, and soon afterwards accused said '"Revenge is sweet, and by - I will be revenged for the treatment I have received here to-day." I can't say to whom this was addressed; Moore, my wife and sister only were within hearing.

We were always on friendly terms; haing known him for many years; he was about half drunk when he made that remark; he bad been worse, but was then recovering and knew well what he said.

He also expressed his dissatisfaction at my interference between him and Moore. I can't say that it was at the time he spoke of being revenged. Cross-examined : I went out to the farm with the Police about nine o'clock on Saturday morning. When I arrived there I found four or five persons with my father, mother, and Mrs. Vickery, looking at the unconsumed articles.

Whilst there some men came to render assistance. I could not say whether it was the roof or lower part of the shed that had been set o fire. A ladder was there. Monday was the first day I looked at the trucks in company with others. Creaghe tried the boot, and others tried their's, but none answered except the one Creaghe bad. On the following day we had a black tracker. The track may have been made by some one who had helped to put out the fire, but I don't think it was, as they all measured. The distance from the shed to Blowering is about nine miles. I have often heard Curry say he was a very old man ; he is said to be about eighty years of age. Richard Creaghe, re-called, deposed : When I went to the scene of the fire on Saturday I searched for tracks, but did not succeed in find- ing any then. It is possible that tracks were there without my seeing them. The tracks we found were not at the commenecement of the ploughed ground but six or seven yard's on it. John Howe, sworn, deposed : I reside at Mr. Quilty's farm. I was at home on Friday night last and went to bed between 10 and 11 o'clock. Shortly before that I looked out and everything was all right. In the dead of night old Mrs. Quilty roused me up, when I saw the shed on fire from one end to the other. My brother and myself with some others tried to save what we could. I then rode into town and told Mr. Quilty. There were no strangers about the premises that night. I was present when Creaghe compared the boot with the track. On coming to Tumut to acquaint Mr. Quilty I found one gate at Shelley's off its hinges ; it is about half-a-inile from the farm, and on one of the roads to Blowering. I would prefer going to Blowering by tbe upper road and not through Shelley's gate. The tracks we saw headed to the road leading to Shelley's gate.

The place could not take fire.

By the Bench : There are dogs about the farm, but I did not hear them after going to bed. No one slept in the shed since the previous Monday.

Cross-examined : I did not see the clock at Vickery's, but heard them say it was 3 o clock.

Six of us tried to extinguish the fire; we were running all about the farm. When I returned from Tumut we all began to shift the wheat.

My brother and self were ploughing the day before the fire, but the ground next the shed we had ploughed about a fortnight before. One man could lift Shelley's gate off its hinges ; my brother has done it. I have seen the accused twice before. John Cluue and myself were getting chaff, out from tbe shed the evening before the fire.

Nobody slept in the shed that night. My brother and self slept in the hut, and two other men slept in a barn which is about thirty rods from the shed. I conclude that the two men slept in the barn that night because I saw them emerge from thence when aroused about the fire by me.

Edward Vickery was sworn, but his evidence was considered very immaterial.

George Waddy Shelley, sworn, deposed : I was at home on Friday night last. The dog made an unusual noise about twelve or one 1 o'clock. I heard no noise of travellers or horses. There are two ways from Blowering to Quilty's farm, one goes by my place. There is one paddock with a gate at each end, both locked. On Saturday last I found both gates unhinged; it was the first time I ever found them so. It is possible for one man to unhinge them. My residence is within two miles of Quilty's farm ; one road goes close to my house, the other is 1 mile from it. The farthest road from my bouse is the nearer one to Blowering from Quilty's farm. Taking the shorter road one would not have to pass through either gate.

Cross-examined: I locked one gate myself about 4 p.m. on Friday last; the other was locked by the person to whom I gave the key. I do not know that it was locked. One road from Quilty's to Blowering is about ten miles, the other about twelve miles.

Re-examined : The gate I locked was that nearest to my house, and the farthest from Quilty's farm.

Sub-Inspector O'Neill asked for a postponement of the case to the following morning in order to produce evidence that no one slept in the shed on Friday night.

His worship objected to do so, unless it could be shewn that the evidence was most material. He thought the only points at present elicited against the accused was the threat he had made use of, and the fact of the finding of a track which corresponded in size with bis boot.

Michael Quilty was then recalled and further cross-examined. He deposed: Some four or five months ago I was told that a person said he would be revenged on me. I have not seen that, person since; we were on bad terms.

John Clune, sworn, deposed : I reside at Mr Quilty's farm, and was there last Friday nigbt. I slept in the barn. No one slept in the shed that night that I know of. No fire was about the shed, nor any one smoking.

Cross-examined: I was in the shed that day for a rope. I seldom smoke.

This being the case for the crown,

His worship the Police Magistrate in discharging the prisoner, said that the evidence went entirely to exculpate him from the crime laid to his charge.

He felt bound to say that the prisoner left the Court without the slightest imputation on his character as far as this case was concerned.

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Marriages Groom's Family NameGroom's Given Name(s)Bride's Family Name(s)Bride's Given Name(s)District

2694/1857 QUILTY MICHAEL married QUILLER SARAH in TUMUT

3032/1859 QUILTY EDWARD BOW ELLEN in TUMUT

2666/1860 QUILTY THOMAS married CLIFFORD MARY in TUMUT

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7225/1884 QUILTY TIMOTHY married HALCORAN BRIDGET in TUMUT

7424/1888 QUILTY TIMOTHY married BOURKE MARGARET AT UMUT

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5540/1906 QUILTY EDWARD married O'KEEFFE CATHERINE H in TUMUT