Historical Tumut Stories Special Correspondent

Historical Tumut Stories

By

Special Correspondent

INDEX

1872

1872 (BY OUR TRAVELLING CORRESPONDENT) - Lob's Hole Tour.

1878

1878

A Tour in the Southern Districts.Date 2nd March 1878 (BY OUR TRAVELLING CORRESPONDENT.)

TUMUT - 1910, 11th June

1926

1928

TUMUT.

1889 (BY OUR TRAVELLING CORRESPONDENT.)

TUMUT.

TUMUT.

Looking up the Blowering Valley from "Stansfield's Cutting" West Blowering to Talbingo Mtn.

TO THIS at 2% Full 1983 !!!!!!! (sad)

SOME LOCAL AREAS OF INTEREST WHEN LOOKING AT THE OVERALL HISTORY OF THE BEAUTIFUL TUMUT AREA AND BLOWERING VALLEY.

Tumut - is a town and local government area approximately four hours drive south-west of Sydney. Tumut is geographically the same distance from both Sydney and Melbourne and was once considered a possible site for the nation's capital.

Tumut is the gateway to the Snowy Mountains Scheme. Its name is derived from an aboriginal name for 'resting place by the river'. (Ref - http://www.rootsweb.com/~ausnsw/regions/southeast.htm)

"Lombardy Poplars"

From Town Bridge leading away

The poplars were planted in 1861 by James Carr for Barney Kelly.

Green to changing colour -

Further change in colour

One of the town's most distinctive features is the double row of "Lombardy" poplar trees which lie across the Tumut River from the Anglican Church. The trees were planted in 1861 and form a distinctive wall which is particularly impressive in summer and autumn.

TUMUT'S GIANT POPLARS. - The poplars, 100 feet high, are growing on the banks of the Tumut River, and form one of the show places of the town. - (Ref- The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842 - 1954) Saturday 5 May 1928).

POPLARS OF TUMUT Landscape Makers. - By "Waratah."

There are some towns which call us back again and again. The call may come from the people, the scenic beauty, or pleasure resorts. Sometimes it is from the parks and gardens, Tumut's call is that of the trees. Its splendid poplars have no superior in this State, and there are also Its elms, oaks, and willows.

Tumut First Hotel

"Tumut"

Tumut Trees at Show ground

Typical Tumut River View.

The first Europeans into the area were the explorers Hume and Hovell who, travelling down the Murrumbidgee River in 1824, came across the Tumut River. They subsequently entered the Tumut Valley.

Four years later settlers arrived in the valley. One of the first settlers was an Irishman, Thomas Boyd, who had travelled with Hume and Hovell (he is buried in the town's historic cemetery on Adelong Road). He settled at 'Rosebank' near Gilmore and is honoured by the region of the town known simply as 'Boyd', it was previously known by the more pedestrian 'Railway End'.

Map Darbalara

Another was a Mr Warby who settled at 'Darbalara' "Darbalara" on the Murrumbidgee and Tumut Rivers. It is known that on 27 November, 1828 the explorer Charles Sturt Captain Charles STURT (on one of his many unsuccessful missions to find Australia's 'inland sea') stopped at Warby's house. It was here that Elizabeth Warby was born on 10 May, 1830 - probably the first European to be born in the valley.

Early Tumut

Tumut Town - About 1872

The township grew slowly. Squatters were well established in the valley but by 1856 the town was nothing more than a single school building, a few mud and slab huts and three hotels. The town had been surveyed, and laid out in a classic grid pattern, as early as 1848 but it was only a major flood in 1852 which finally persuaded the locals to form some kind of a town.

By 1860 the town had grown to a point where it a local newspaper which eagerly reported that the local cricket club was holding annual meetings and the cricket played on the town's racecourse was so popular that three publicans' booths were provided (the publicans had to pay a guinea for the priviledge) to quench the thirst of the players and spectators. After the game the players headed for the Woolpack Hotel for more drinking.

The Goldrush era saw the rapid development of the town. At one stage in 1860 there was a report of over 1200 men passing through Tumut in the space of four days as they headed to the Kiandra goldfields. With gold came the bushrangers. The town's one bushranger was William Brookman, a carpenter by trade, who joined the infamous 'Blue Cap' gang. But the the most famous bushranger to work in the area was James Kelly (brother of Ned) who, in 1877, stole some horses in Wagga which they later tried to sell in Tumut.

The post-goldrush period, which had seen people moving through the area to the Adelong and Kiandra goldfields, saw a small boom in the town's fortunes. By 1866 the number of pubs had grown to eleven and this had expanded to 18 pubs by 1880. Today the town has only six pubs. It became a municipality in 1887 and the Tumut Shire, including Batlow and Adelong was created in 1928.

Oriental Hotel - Cnr Fitzroy and Wynyard St's, Tumut.

The Oriental Hotel was originally known as the Queens Arms. It is a typical goldrush era building showing off its affluence. There was a pub on this site as early as 1850 and the first publican was a man named Madigan. This new hotel was designed and built by Frederick Kinred about 1876. He took up Madigan's license. It has a beautiful cast iron verandah.

Bank Corner

The corner of Wynyard and Russell Streets is bank corner with the old Bank of New South Wales (now Westpac), which was built in 1891, on the south west corner. A managers residence was built on the first floor.

Tumut CBC Bank - Wynyard St & Russell St's

CBC Bank (now the National) built in 1889 on the north eastern corner. It also had a managers residence built above. The old Bank of New South Wales is a late Victorian Free Classical building characterised by a two-storey arcaded verandah and Ionic pilasters. The hipped corrugated iron roof is topped by three large chimneys. The old CBC bank is a Victorian Classical Revival designed by the Mansfield brothers. The verandah is supported by fluted cast-iron columns and there are attractive French windows on the first floor.

The Commonwealth Bank is also in Wynyard Street on the northern side between Russell and Fitzroy Street's. It also had a managers residence built on the first floor.

Rotary Lookout

Continue up Wynyard Street. At the top there is an excellent view across the town and the Tumut River to Bombowlee.

photo

Tumut Museum

Place photo

Located in Capper St, the Tumut Museum holds a good display of memorabilia about the local area. It is open Saturdays and Wednesdays from 2.00 p.m. to 4.00 p.m. and at other times by arrangement, tel: (02) 6947 2183, (02) 6947 6731 or (02) 6947 1380.

Pioneer Cemetery

Place photo

Beyond the Roman Catholic Church, cross over the Highway (Adelong Road), following Gocup Rd for a short distance then turn left into a driveway that leads directly to the town's Pioneer Cemetery. The most notable gravestones are those of Thomas Boyd who travelled from Sydney to the present day site of Melbourne with the explorers Hume and Hovell. Also of interest is the grave of the talented Aboriginal cricketer Johnny Taylor who died of measles in 1875. He worked as a stockman at Blowering and was known as the best cricketer in the district before his untimely death. He was in his 20s when he died.

Pioneer Park

Place photo

Located opposite the town's swimming pool, and adjacent the Tumut River, this is a beautiful rural retreat with fine displays of European deciduous trees which are shady in the summer months and spectacular during autumn. There are plenty of park benches for picnics and a pleasant stream winds through the centre of the park.

Stockwell Gardens

Situated around the intersection of Richmond and Russell Streets, the trees have botanical name plates in this award-winning garden.

River Walk

A pleasant walk by the Tumut River.

The Visitors centre has a book available outlining a tree walk. It focuses on the trees from Bungle Rd, along the river to Pioneer Park, taking in Stockwell Gardens.

Elm Drive

Sometimes referred to as the 'Avenue of Elms' this is a spectacular and pleasant walk in any season but is most impressive in spring and autumn when the trees are thick with leaves. It leads down to the old racecourse and further on is the original site of the township which was destroyed by a flood in 1852.

Tumut Broom Factory

Place photo

Millet brooms are still handmade at the Tumut Broom Factory which is located on Adelong Road (ask at the Visitor Centre for directions) and is open from 8.30 a.m. to 4.30 p.m. on weekdays (closed for lunch). There is no entry fee and no bookings are necessary, except for coaches tel: (02) 6947 2804.

Tumut Valley African Violets Farm

With over 950 named varieties it is reputedly the largest African violet farm in Australia. Located in the grounds of the 120-year-old Tumut Plains School House. It is located 7 km from Tumut on Tumut Plains Rd and offers morning and afternoon teas at the Garden Cafe. In summer, and on school and public holidays, it is open daily from 10.00 a.m. to 5.00 p.m., closing at 4.00 p.m. in winter. There is no entry fee and no bookings are necessary, except for coaches. For more information contact the owners on (02) 6947 2432.

Boonderoo Wines

Situated on Boonderoo Road (off the Snowy Mountain Highway to the south of town), this small winery is open for tastings and cellar door sales most weekends and at other times by arrangement, tel: (02) 6947 2060.

Bonnie B's Shaker Shed

Place photo

This eccentric collection of over 3000 salt and pepper shakers can be seen by groups or coach groups for an individual entry fee of $2. Located 2.5 km from the main street via the Snowy Mountains Highway (just across Currawong Rd) they are open most days from 10.00 a.m. to 5.00 p.m., tel: (02) 6947 2060.

Blowering Dam

Take the Snowy Mountains Highway out of town, heading towards Cooma and follow the signs to the Blowering Dam. The journey is 12 km. The dam is impressive with the wall being over 120 metres high. It has the second largest storage capacity in the whole Snowy Mountains project. The dam was the site where the world's longest water-ski run occurred when someone kept going for 1673 km. It also became the location of the world water-ski record when Ken Warby travelled across it on skis at 510.45 km/hour in 1978.

Snowy Mountains Trout Farm

Situated on the Old West Blowering Road, just south from Oddy's Bridge

Located below the Blowering Dam wall, the trout farm, touted as NSW's largest, is open daily from 9.00 a.m. to 3.00 p.m. for fish sales. Self-guided tours are available on weekends for a small fee, tel: (02) 6947 3612.

Bushwalking

Camp site - during a Long Bush Walk.

There are a large number of tracks in the area many of which are now part of the Hume and Hovell Walking Track. The most impressive is the 18 km Thomas Boyd Track which crosses valleys on swing bridges. Information about the tracks, including detailed topographical maps, can be obtained from the Tumut Visitors Centre, tel: (02) 6947 7025.

1924 - HUME-HOVELL MEMORIAL Sydney, Saturday. Sir George Fuller, the Premier, and Sir Austin Chapman at Gunning yesterday unveiled a column with a tablet at FISh River in connection with the Hume-Hovell centenary, and laid a foundation stone of the literary instituto and museum for old relics and war trophies. - (Ref- Barrier Miner (Broken Hill, NSW : 1888 - 1954)(about) Previous issue Saturday 18 October 1924_.

Poplars touched by autumn colours in the Tumut Valley

Davis view looking north from West Blowering Road

Festival of the Falling Leaf.

There is a widely accepted view that autumn in Tumut offers the most spectacular display of 'colours' anywhere in New South Wales. In the 1950s the local headmaster, Alf Woods, instituted the idea of a Festival to celebrate the arrival of autumn and the falling leaves which characterised the town's many parks and gardens. It has become a hugely popular event and is held each year in April-May. Contact (02) 6947 7025 for more information.

Rotay Diary

Place photo

Have you ever seen a Rotary Diary working before? Visitors can view one working at the 3 p.m. milking at this dairy on Tumut Plains Rd, Tumut - just telephone (02) 6947 1905 to make arrangements.

Hang Gliding

Blowering - view from a Glider

"Air Escape" offer powered hang glider flights from Tumut Aerodrome on Brungle Road. They operate daily and offer a trial introductory half-hour flight,

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A Tour in the Southern Districts.

Date 2nd March 1889 (BY OUR TRAVELLING CORRESPONDENT.)

TUMUT.

A Tour in the Southern Districts.

(FROM OUR TRAVELLING- CORRESPONDENT.)

COOMA TO ADAMINABY.

COOMA is situated in a hollow, surrounded on the south and west by high ranges, and on the east and north hills close the view. It cannot be called a pretty town, and, in that respect, will not favour ably compare with Bombala. On entering the town, the first building of importance that catches the eye is the hospital, built of dark granite, lt is not very large, but, I am happy to say, suffi ciently extensive for the district. The gaol has, within the last few months, been turned to better use, having been made into an asylum for lunatics. The building is commodious, and appears to answer all requirements. I must compliment the superintendent for the scrupulously clean aopear ance of every department. The patients, number ing some sixty-five, had a healthy appearance, and it is hoped will derive a benefit from the change from Gladesville. It would have been an advan tage, had the recreation grounds been larger. Close to the asylum is the court-house, now having some additions made to it. Near to this is seen the commencement of the new Post and Telegraph office, which is to be built of dark granite,*abuudance of which is easily obtained in the neighbourhood. This edifice will take close on two years before completion at the present rate of progress. From the plans kindly shown me it will both be an ornament and much wanted office. The Catholic chapel is in a forward state, and stands on a commanding rise. The two most tasteful buildings in the town are the English church and the public school, the latter under the charge of Mr. Gale. The school building reflects great credit on the local board, as also the Council for its completeness. I had the pleasure of hear ing the pupils at their lessons, and must certainly say I was surprised at the proficiency shown by them, not only in one particular branch, but in all. Mr. Gale must have been very painstaking to have them so far advanced. The township shows signs that some few years ago business must have been very flourishing, but latterly things have not. been as formerly. This is partly accounted forby,the fact that most of the ready money goes ,; into thι Lands Office for selections. In the course of time business will naturally revivo, when the selectors have cleared off their liabilities. I learn that the amount paid into the

Land Office weekly averages something like i £800 ; a large sum to disappear out of the district. As showing some of the wealth of Monaro, Ο may mention that in round numbers 600,000 sheep are registered in the police district of Cooma alone, There are several good stores in the town, which are those of Mr. Lazarus, Mr. W. B. Carey, Mr. Solomon, all in the general line, and who appear to do a good trade. Mr. Margoschis has a fine stock of jewellery, and is the only watchmaker in the place. Mr. H. Thornton, cabinetmaker, has a show-room filled with upholstery of all kinds, and of the best descriptions, and can, at very short notice, furnish a house complete. The hotels muster largely ; the Prince of Wales, by Mr. M. Lucy (at which I located myself during my visit), is well worth patronising, the liquors and comes tables being excellent, combined with civility and attention. There is also the Cooma Hotel, in tho hands of Mr. G. Cohen, while Mr. W. B. Cohen carries on the Australian, and Mr. Harrison has the Commercial. All these buildings are substantial; but there are several tumble-down domiciles scattered over the town ship. The Commercial and New South Wales Banks have each a branch. At the new year a School of Arts; is to be commenced, the contract for which has already been taken. Some £400 is now in hand, and with the Government subsidy ought to put up a respectable building on the piece of ground granted them near the courthouse. The post and telegraph offices are in charge of Mr. Kirwan and assistants, and a busy time they have of it, as some ninety odd mails are received and despatched during the week, arriving and depart ing at all hours of the twenty-four. There might have been greater taste displayed than is shown in the private residences around Cooma. Horti culture is decidedly at a discount, with the excep tion of one or two who have a few pot plants. As to vegetation, Cooma depends upon the " Heathen Chinee." Half a mile from Cooma proper, over the hill, is the Royal Hotel belonging to Mrs. Hains, stand ing almost alone in its glory. I am given to understand that Government planned out the township here, but the public preferred the present site. Four miles from Cooma, on the Adaminaby road, is Pine Valley Hotel, owned and kept by Mr. Stewart. The proprietor intends, at theend of the year, relinquishing business and confining himself to grazing and farming pursuits, having 600 acres purchased laud besides some 3000 leased, upon which he has 5000 sheep. Shearing commenced last week in the grease, and promises to turn out well. Continuing along the main road, I pass by Cool ringdon run, the property of Messrs. A. and. D. Ryrie. The huinestead is situated three miles off the "road, and 10 miles from Cooma. The land over which I passed is very stony in some places, affording only poor feed, but in between the Hills the grass is more plentiful. Adjoining Coolring don is Mr. HasselPs property, running some dis- : tance along the road. I observed in my ride that . several selections must have changed ownership, ' as there aro only the remnants of the hut and ira provements left. . The road from Mr. Hassell's for tho next six miles passes through a heit of timber, the land being of poor quality. After leaving this belt ! emerged into a valley fringed on both sides with ranges of timber and scrub. This valley, ten miles in length/leads up to Adaminaby. The' township is placed on tho side of a hill, and from a distance has quite an imposing look, which, however, on a closer ncquaiutanco is hardly realised. There aro three or four stores in the - town. Tho iirst on entering belongs to Mr. H. Barrett, with a good stock of goods to select from. Gloso to this is tho Rose Inn, the proprietor being Mr. Geo. Barrett, -who also has a fine selection a little distance out. Further along the street on the opposite side is Mr. Melville's hotel, replete with all good cheer fer travellers. At the end of the township is Mr. Gaulwny's Commercial Hotel, only a short time re-opened by the obliging pro prietor.

Several selections have been taken up around Adaminaby, leaving little of the original run re maining. Mr. John Mackay has a purchased pro perty of 300 acres of fair average quality land, besides a selection of 200 acres. Mr. W. Eccleston's selection is four miles away, and contains an ex cellent paddock of wheat. Tho cereal appears to grow to great advantage this season in this locality. At the time of my visit the cultivation paddocks around Adaminaby looked far more green and healthy than those of any other part of Monaro, the dry season suiting tho land better than a wet one.

ADAMINABY TO GEGEDZERICK.

Making a circuit by way of Gegedzerick, tho road trends through a valley thirteen miles long, at an angle of 25° to the one I entered Adaminaby by. Along the valley, of narrow proportions, some few selections have been taken up, and about ten miles up it is Mr. Delaney's, who kindly proffered me refreshment, of which I availed myself. At the end of the valley I again entered the tirnbor, and a two-mile ride brought me to Middling Bank Station, belonging to M. Byrne, Esq., who has only within the last three months become tho proprietor of this estate, which contains somo 14,000 acres. The owner was busy with his shear ing, but only 1400 sheep were undergoing the operation this season. It is the owner's intention to fully stock the run for the future. A rido of twelve miles through poor forest land, and I arrived at sunset at Mr. lt. Evans's, whose is the largest selection around Gegedzeriek, having 30O0 acres secured, besides 7000 acres leasehold. . Upon this estate some 5000 sheep have been grazing, and these were, at the time of my visit, passing through the process of washing, which put a different complexion on their good fleeces. The Hock I saw yarded were only two and three toothed, and, taken as a whole, could hardly be sur passed-not a crawler to be seen. Lambing has been very good, coming up to 91 per cent. Shear ing was to commence on the following Monday in a very commodious shed near the house. This shed contains all the usual appliances requisito for the purpose, with an excellent wool press. Mr. Evans was very fortunate during the last seasons with his stock, travelling them into tho mountains twenty miles off, to the very place in which a million or more sheep from all parts of Riverina were snowed up and such sad havoc made among them before they were extricated.. Mr. Evans has accumulated his present wealth during the last fourteen years by his own energy and perseverance, and intends, during next year, completing a resi dence moro in accordance with his position. To the host and hostess I return my thanks for their kindness during my stay. A short distance up tho creek is a nice selection, belonging to Mr. Jones, but only having been lately taken up, not many improvements have been lnndo.

Adjoining Mr. Evans's property is Kiah Lake Station, which last August passed into the hands of Mr. Gunning. A fine stone house, with garden in front, stands in the home paddock. This run of 20,000 acres, 3000 of which are secured, is nothing like stocked, as only somo 5000 sheep will bo shorn this season at Mr. Evans's shed. The woolshed bolonging to the estate was burnt down, and the new one is not completed. There is somo good land around, with fattening properties, and Mr. Gunning, no doubt, will amply avail himself of its opportunities from his practical knowledge of sheep-farming, From Kiah Lake the road leads into good open country, and a two mile cauter brought me to Ber ridale store and post-office, of Gegedzerick, owned and conducted by Mr. Oliver, who is also the pos sessor of a large aroa of land around. Mr. Oliver being from home, I could glean no particulars. Continuing my way two miles further, I came upon Mr. Granville's selection, who has evidently made tho most of its capabilities. A very fine paddock of wheat of even growth is first met with', and from its promising appearance ought to return handsomely. A neat stone residence stands along side tho road, with garden on both sides. Taking a cross road from Mr. Glanville's for a mile, I came upon tho main one leading to Wool way, distant some 2½ miles by a fair track. Haif a-mile before reaching the homestead it comes in view, and a charming spot it looks. Woolway belongs to Mr. Pryce, and is of very old standing. The residenco is surrounded by gardens, green house, &c, the whole enclosed by acacia and elderberry trees, which, being now in full bloom, gave the place as picturesque an aspect as any I had visited on Monaro. The land, though stony, alfords good pasture for sheep, and some 12,000 will bo shorn this year, but whether in tho grease or not had not definitely been decided upon. A good six-mile ride brought me to Bobundarrah. ,

The General Assembly of the Victorian Presby terian Church met at Melbourne last Tuesday.^ In the course of the proceedings Dr. Morrison submitted the report of the committee on affiliated colleges, recommending that the church should, with out any delay, proceed to tho erection of an affiliated college on the ground set apart for that purpoBO at the University, and that the sum of £10,000 be raised with that view. The building to serve the following objects :-A college of residence for students attends ing the University, and a theological hall for the training of students for the ministry, The report was adopted,- (Ref- Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907)(about) Previous issue Saturday 1 December 1877 Next issue Previous Page No. 23).

DISTRICT NEWS TUMUT. (From. Our Own Correspondent.)

A farewell and presentation was tendered Miss Ada Bridle prior to her marriage to Mr. C. W. Oddy, of Albury, at the residence of Mr. Jack Oddy, Bowler's Flat. Mr. J. P. Sullivan, J.P., made the presentation (a silver cake basket and silver-mounted biscuit barrel) on behalf of her many friends. Miss Dora Sullivan returned thanks for the bride-elect for the gifts, which would always be looked upon by the recipient as amongst her most valued gifts.

At last. meeting of the local hospital committee, cNurse M. Harrison was appointed junior probationer as from Juno 1; Nurse D. Enright as probationer. Sister Whitlock recommenced her duties on June 8. It was decided to purchase an extra cow, also that a drain be cut and willows planted. Department of Public Health asked for reply to their letter on the subject o-f preventive inoculation of hospital nursing, staff against typhoid.

Gundagai footballers visited Tumut on Sunday, and succeeded in taking back with them the Watt Cup. They won the game by one point only, scores being: — Gundagai, 9; Tumut 8.

At the benefit dance for Mrs. Smith, In the Oddfellow's Hall, Mrs W. Clee (nee Ethel Kemp) suddenly collapsed and became unconscious. She was taken to the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. Kemp, in Merrivale street, where she died the next morning at 5 o'clock without regaining consciousness. She leaves a sorrowing husband and one grown up son. The funeral took place on Sunday, and was one of the longest seen in Tumut. Deceased was only 38 years of age, and very popular with all friends.

A meeting of the Tumut Parents and Citizens' Association was recently held in the Literary Institute. Dr. Clouston presided. Enthusiastic support was given the proposal to form a Junior Forestry League under the direction of Mr. W. de Beuzcville, chief forester. Mr. C. Teasdale was em powered to foster the movement at the school. . The Education Department wrote, stating that modern furniture of the dual desk type could not be installed at Tumut School until tho congestion at the furniture workshops had been relieved.

The Convent ball was held in O'Brien's Hall on Monday night last. There was a splendid attendance, and the hall was beautifully decorated in gold, mauve and purplo streamers. Music was supplied by Miss Bessie Carr's (Gundagai) orchestra, with extras by Misses E. and G. Howitt, of Tumut. A juvenile was held the following night, and equally well patronised.

A benefit dance and euchre party, organised by the Tumut Relief Committee for Mrs. Smith, held in the Oddfellow's Hall, was very successful. The gross takings amounted to £26, of which £20/7/ was sent to Mrs. Smith, the balance being expenses. The chocolate waltz was won by Miss Burg and Mr. N. Stuart. The euchre tournament was won by Mrs. J. Lee and Mr. E. Nuttall. The annual meeting of the Tumut Town Band was held in the Council Chambers on Friday, 11th June. The secretary read his report, and the treasurer presented the balance-sheet which showed the receipts to be: — Street collections, £66/19/2; business house collections, £109/3/6; engagements, £62/6/6; special efforts, £9/8/1; J. M. Herron, £2/1/6; bank interest, £1/7/7; donations, £1/15/; recital in park, £2/8/11; council subsidy (arrears included), £50; Christmas collections, £17/16/; continental, £33/15/; balance brought forward from 1925, £43/6/10; total, £430 8/1. Expenditure. Bandmastor's salary, £231; repairs to instruments, £6/6/10; music, £5/3/10; conveyance of band, £17/10/; advertising,; 6/; stationery' and stamps, etc. £3/6/11^; W. H. Paling and Co., £16/3/8; bank fee and cheque book, £1; medals, £1/7/6; rent bandroom from Wang Loon, £3/4/; installation; electric light in bandroom, £5/10/; insurance on . instruments, £5/5/2; refund to Friendly Society sports, commit too, £4/10/; refreshments for players, 10/; J. J. Learmont, balance on instruments, £31/2/2; special players engaged, £1/10/; continental freight chargo, £15; cartage, 14/7; sundries,-£2/6/7; credit ' balance in bank,-£78/10/9J; total, £430/8/1. The following were' elected members of the citizens committee:— Messrs. T.. Laird, C. Teasdalo, E. Senintler, E. Elphick, W. Emery and H. James; council representatives, Aid. J. Elphick (mayor), R. Masters and C. Burt; band representatives, Messrs. G Baker, H. Mount and R. H. Wilkinson. Office-bearers. — President, J. J. Learmont; vice-president, Mr. N. C. Adams; treasurer, Mr. H. Mount; secretary, Mr. R. H. Wilkinson; auditors, Messrs. O. C. Potts and H.Weedon. - (Ref- Albury Banner and Wodonga Express (NSW : 1896 - 1939)(about) Previous issue Friday 2 July 1926 Page 41)

This report is submitted in good faith. All endeavours have been made to make all entries authentic and correct. For any corrections and additional valuable information, maps and photos you may have please contact John

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Go where you will in search of landscape beauty-the rugged grandeur of the Blue Mountains, the soft, rolling plains of Bathurst, or the silver-lined and green-bordered sea- scapes of the south coast,' where the blue of the ocean is so intense-there is nothing to surpass the panorama from Hospital Hill. Tumut. It is not merely the ever-changing play of colour along the hillsides which makes this picture so enchanting. Alternating shadow patches of purple and gold are thrown on the landscape screen when the sky is flecked with fleecy clouds. On bright, sunny days in springtime it is all shining green, with mauve and grey shadings along the ridges. There is beauty, too, in the gentle contour of the tree-topped slopes, which is balm to the heart of an artist.

Away to the south lhere is another note of majestic splendour, where the frowning blue cliffs of Talbingo Range look down. In the middle foreground runs the willow-lined river, snow-fed and gushing over rapids until it spreads out below the township into a silver stream.

But through all is the dominant note of the poplars. They divide the landscape into a series of splendid pictures, each complete in Itself and suitably framed. First, the poplars of Bombowlee, just over the bridge, known and discussed wherever tree-lovers gather-for their height and girth. Like giant sentinels they stand, and their scintillating leaves can be seen far and wide.

More poplars are seen to right and left, some in groups, singles, and long files of them dividing paddocks. Poplars harmonise with the slender church steeple, giving an English setting, poplars along the hills and flats until they meit into a hazy blue distance, way out towards Brungle and Gundagai.

There is an old world atmosphere about it all, and both the green of the springtime or the burning lights of autumn seem to belong to older climes. Certainly, it is something alien to the rest of the State. Softness and colour blending are the keynotes. But it is the poplars which are Indelibly imprinted on the mind. Their call will not remain unanswered. - (Ref- The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842-1954) Saturday 10 December 1938).

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TUMUT [FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT.] - The showers which fell throughout this district towards the end of last month inspired people with the hope that the drought had broken up; but since then we have experienced dry warm weather, with occasional strong westerly winds. These have had the effect of carrying off the rain clouds, and of drying up all surface moisture in the soil. On Thursday night there was a slight frost. The state of the weather is causing general uneasiness. A bush fire is burning in the ranges to the south of the town.

As the arrangements made by the Hon. James Hoskins necessitated his leaving Tumut earlier than his friends expected, the dinner which was to have taken place on Friday was dispensed with. For the same reason Mr. Hoskins was unable to accept several private invitations. After his re-election the hon. gentleman lunched with a number of his constituents.

On Wednesday evening last, a numerously attended meeting was held at Mr. Quilty's Commercial Hotel, for the purpose of distributing the prizes awarded at the late show of the Tumut Agricultural and Pastoral Association; the president, Mr. E. G. Brown, occupied the chair. The secretary, Mr. H. C. Tingcombe, informed those present that the prize list amounted to £114 18s., which sum had been paid out of the funds of the association, while only subscriptions from 101 members had been received; still their financial position was good, and when the money promised by the Government was received they would be in quite a prosperous condition. In his opinion, the judges at the late show, if they had not in every instance decided to the satisfaction of exhibitors, had at least acted in a very liberal spirit ; and he thought, for the future, it would be well that where there was only a single exhibit in a class no prize should be given, but that would a matter for the members to consider. Mr. H. Hoad, of Bombowlee, was the largest prize-taker. Mr. J. Allatt, who carried off the prize for the best plough made in the district, and whose exhibits generally were of a high order, came in for a share of applause.

On the motion of Mr. H. Hoad, seconded by Mr. N. Emanuel, it was agreed that the ploughing match should be held on the 16th May next.

It was also decided, that the bull and stallion show shall take place in September following. Ere the meeting closed votes of thanks to the secretary, treasurer, and other officers of the society were carried with acclamation. The chairman pointed out that the association was greatly indebted to those gentlemen who had come long distances to fill the office of judge at the show, and who had striven to do justice to all with the strictest impartiality.

Beautiful town nestled in the Tumut Valley at the foothills of the Snowy Mountains. By any measure Tumut is an exceptionally pretty country town. The Tumut River, which runs for 145 km before joining the Murrumbidgee River at Gundagai, flows along the edge of the town; the plains spread out on either side of the river; and the foothills of the Snowy Mountains rise on all sides. The rainfall ensures that, apart from times of drought, the valley is characteristically green and fertile.

BEAUTIFUL TUMUT. - (BY O.H.)

"A thing of beauty is a joy for ever." When that "thing" is a thriving country town, with delightful environs, it becomes not only a joy to local resident and immigrant, but a prolific source of revenue. Who shall say that it was not this very beauty, apart from the abundance of marsupials, which many years ago led the neighbourling kings from Murrumbidgee, Monaro, and Bombowlie to assemble their people at Doomut.

As this historic meeting of monarchs there were no reportors present. Neither were any minutes taken of the subsequent conference. But the last of the Doomut tribe, who drifted to Brungle, talked big of the great assemblage. The talk-sticks had been sent round the mountains and up the winding streams which splashed merrily over the shallows on their way to the Bidgee. Then when the southern moon grew to fullness, the tribes assembled at the rendezvous. The reception of delegates, or corroboree, was a grand affair, over 500 participating. So also was the subsequent banquet. But the proceedings terminated rather abruptly. A buck from Monaro, entranced with the charms of a Fish River maiden, desired her for his lubra. She scorned the foreign yoke, so the Monaro brave, following the time-honoured custom, stunned her with a blow from his waddy. The blow was heard a hundred yards off. It was heard by a young Fish River warrior, whose mia mia the young malden had promised to grace. So the Fish River black protested with a boomorang. Monaro replied with a spear. There was a division. Spears, boomerangs, and other missiles darkened the air. Pandemonium reigned. The young gin primarily responsible for the fracas slumbered peacefully. The Doomut King, who had presided at the function, failed to restore order, and the gathering dispersed. The rather meagre details procurable from old Brungal Tommy do not include the number of killed and wounded.

After the visitors had departed the local blacks lived in peace and quiet at Doomut, which, being translated, is "The Camping Place." Stringy-bark humpies were raised. Fish in abundance came from the river, while in the ranges the warriors found kangaroo, wallaby, and bears. But soon the white man came from "over the ranges," and encroached on the happy hunting grounds of the aboriginals.

Cattle took the place of the marsupial on all the country round Doomut and Bombowlee. The blacks thinned out, and the last of the tribe migrated to Brungal. King Tommy for years held sway along the banks of the little creek that rushes and tumbles down between the mountains.

A medal presented in 1812 by Mr. John Keighren, the original owner of Brungle, was proudly worn by the old monarch. But Tommy's end is shrouded in mystery. Tradition has it that he was speared in a fight with some raiding natives from Yass. A less picturesque but more probable story is that he and 50 of his tribe were wiped out by an influenza epidemic, which decimated the tribes in the Upper Murrumbidgee. But two years ago King Tommy's old brass medal was unearthed at Brungle, as it is now spelt. Here at the Mission Station, in charge of Mr. Hubbard, the remaining aboriginals of the district are located. When Christmas cheer comes round the population of the settlement reaches well over a hundred. Ordinarily it is about 80. And those are not by any means the degenerate blacks that one meets on the bends of the outback rivers. They are great athletes, holding their own at cricket and football, and pulling off many prizes at district sports meetings. They do all the cultivating at the station, and some of the men can plough and furrow with the best farmers of the district.

Reverting to Tumut, as the old camping place came to be called, it was 1848 before the district was settled sufficiently to warrant the visit of the Government surveyors who laid out the town. A courthouse and lockup of gum slabs and bark, with a mounted trooper and black tracker, stood as the symbols of law and order and British justice.

Postmaster and School master Hilton looked after her Majesty's mails in his spare time, inculcated into the currency lads and lasses some of the rudiments of the three R's.

On the fertile Tumut "plains" were then settled the Shellys,

Whitty and Blowering,

Anderson and Foord occupied Tumut station;

Wilkinson selected Yallowin, and

Broughton held Gadara,

while a Rankin squatted at Bombowlee.

It was cattle rather than sheep that occupied the attentions of the back woodsman. But soon the hornies grew so plentiful that they became too cheap. After sending a mob all the way to Sydney the squatter only realised 16s a head. Station hands worked for three half crowns a week and their keep. Old hands still talk of the days when there were 29 boiling down establishments in the colony. That was the first or cattle era.

Then came gold. In 1848 gold was discovered at California, and a few years later in Australia. In 1851 John Bridle, now hale and hearty at 84, won the first half ounce from the Tumut River. At Talbingo, Adelong, and Gobragandra rich alluvial patches were located. Thousands of adventurous miners and prospectors made southwards from Port Jackson. And the underpaid stockmen and drovers joined in the hunt for gold. Station hands were unprocurable at £3 a week, Cattle jumped from 15s to £5 a head.

Then resulted the third or agricultural age. With the establishments of mining townships came a big demand for foodstuffs also. Tumut supplied most of the country side, right to Yackandandah, over the border. It became the granary of New South Wales. It paid handsomely to grow wheat and maize, fruits, and potatoes. Tumut grew and prospered. Broad tree lined thoroughfares were backed by offices, stores, and residences. Picturesque orchards dotted the landscape, and when the first fruit growers' conference was subsequently held in the metropolis, the Tumut delegates presented a collection which put completely in the shade the first fruits of the coast and Cumberland. Farms multiplied until the "plains" were like unto a gigantic chess board.

Dairy farmers followed, and thousands of milkers meandered along the river to their dowlaps deep in the clover feed. In the back country the grazier added his quota to the town's sustenance, and its permanence and solvency were assured. The iron horse connected the town with the metropolis. A butter factory, freezing works, flour mills, and other commercial undertakings arose to testify to the enterprise of the inhabitants.

Then the wisdom of our statesmen and the co-oporatlon of our people saw the dream of a grand united Austialia crystallise into actual fact, and search was made for the capital of the continent. Experts scoured the mother State, as dreamors of old scoured the planet for the "Elixir of Life" or the Philosopher's Stone. In course of time they came to Tumut. They filled their lungs with the fresh invigorating atmosphere. They lifted their eyes to the green clad hills and saw afar off fleecy clouds clinging to the purple mountains. They wandered along the banks of the beautiful Tumut River, and heard the laughter of rippling waters, the sweet wild note of the magpie, the hilarious cachinnation of goburras, and the joyous twitterings of myriad feathered songsters.

They noted the giant poplars, the stately elms and oaks, reminiscent of old England. Luscious old world fruits delighted their epicurean palates. The despised poet of the senses inhaled the scent of new mown hay and the honeyed sweet of wattle bloom and gum. Beyond were the fantastic stalagmitess and stalactites of Yarrangobilly, the wonder of thermal springs, the fern fringed gorges of Jounama, and, loveliest of all, the white veil of laughing water the splashing silver crystals of Buddong Falls.

The senses enjoyed a galaxy of beauty. It was only what was expected when beautiful Tumut was chosen as the ideal site for the capital of Federated Australia Politics, however, is a complex game, in which the players make many strange moves. As the cards were shuffled again and again other sites came uppermost, and Tumut, queen of them all, slippod unnoticed to the bottom of the pack. Wistfully the locals saw the coveted honour-amost within their grasp fade away. But though robbed of the supreme distinction Tumut must over be the resort of the world-weary, the poet, the artist, the sportsman, and the tourist. Not without reason has Tumut been called the prettiest town in Australia. Enthusiasts may sigh for the glory which might have been; but he who has heard the song of the "Out of Doors," and knows the love of forest and fen, will never regret that the peaceful calm of Tumut River has been spared the intrusion of the politician and the demagogue. - (Ref- The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842-1954) Saturday 11 June 1910).

1870 Appointment of ENUMERATORS for the CENSUS.

Gentlemen appointed to be Enumerators under the provisions of the NSW Census Act for 1871. Full list given.

[Government Gazette, 8 December, 1870, p.2731.]

Tumut - Henry HILTON; - (Ref- http://www.dcstechnical.com.au/Rusheen/1.0_People.htm)

1880 - Tumut Certified Denominational Roman Catholic School - Mr Thomas CORCORAN, Teacher.

BEAUTIFUL TUMUT. - (BY O.H.)

"A thing of beauty is a joy for ever." When that "thing" is a thriving country town, with delightful environs, it becomes not only a joy to local resident and immigrant, but a prolific source of revenue. Who shall say that it was not this very beauty, apart from the abundance of marsupials, which many years ago led the neighbourling kings from Murrumbidgee, Monaro, and Bombowlie to assemble their people at Doomut.

As this historic meeting of monarchs there were no reportors present. Neither were any minutes taken of the subsequent conference. But the last of the Doomut tribe, who drifted to Brungle, talked big of the great assemblage. The talk-sticks had been sent round the mountains and up the winding streams which splashed merrily over the shallows on their way to the Bidgee. Then when the southern moon grew to fullness, the tribes assembled at the rendezvous. The reception of delegates, or corroboree, was a grand affair, over 500 participating. So also was the subsequent banquet. But the proceedings terminated rather abruptly. A buck from Monaro, entranced with the charms of a Fish River maiden, desired her for his lubra. She scorned the foreign yoke, so the Monaro brave, following the time-honoured custom, stunned her with a blow from his waddy. The blow was heard a hundred yards off. It was heard by a young Fish River warrior, whose mia mia the young malden had promised to grace. So the Fish River black protested with a boomorang. Monaro replied with a spear. There was a division. Spears, boomerangs, and other missiles darkened the air. Pandemonium reigned. The young gin primarily responsible for the fracas slumbered peacefully. The Doomut King, who had presided at the function, failed to restore order, and the gathering dispersed. The rather meagre details procurable from old Brungal Tommy do not include the number of killed and wounded.

After the visitors had departed the local blacks lived in peace and quiet at Doomut, which, being translated, is "The Camping Place." Stringy-bark humpies were raised. Fish in abundance came from the river, while in the ranges the warriors found kangaroo, wallaby, and bears. But soon the white man came from "over the ranges," and encroached on the happy hunting grounds of the aboriginals.

Cattle took the place of the marsupial on all the country round Doomut and Bombowlee. The blacks thinned out, and the last of the tribe migrated to Brungal. King Tommy for years held sway along the banks of the little creek that rushes and tumbles down between the mountains.

A medal presented in 1812 by Mr. John Keighren, the original owner of Brungle, was proudly worn by the old monarch. But Tommy's end is shrouded in mystery. Tradition has it that he was speared in a fight with some raiding natives from Yass. A less picturesque but more probable story is that he and 50 of his tribe were wiped out by an influenza epidemic, which decimated the tribes in the Upper Murrumbidgee. But two years ago King Tommy's old brass medal was unearthed at Brungle, as it is now spelt. Here at the Mission Station, in charge of Mr. Hubbard, the remaining aboriginals of the district are located. When Christmas cheer comes round the population of the settlement reaches well over a hundred. Ordinarily it is about 80. And those are not by any means the degenerate blacks that one meets on the bends of the outback rivers. They are great athletes, holding their own at cricket and football, and pulling off many prizes at district sports meetings. They do all the cultivating at the station, and some of the men can plough and furrow with the best farmers of the district.

Reverting to Tumut, as the old camping place came to be called, it was 1848 before the district was settled sufficiently to warrant the visit of the Government surveyors who laid out the town. A courthouse and lockup of gum slabs and bark, with a mounted trooper and black tracker, stood as the symbols of law and order and British justice.

Postmaster and School master Hilton looked after her Majesty's mails in his spare time, inculcated into the currency lads and lasses some of the rudiments of the three R's.

On the fertile Tumut "plains" were then settled the Shellys,

Whitty and Blowering,

Anderson and Foord occupied Tumut station;

Wilkinson selected Yallowin, and

Broughton held Gadara,

while a Rankin squatted at Bombowlee.

It was cattle rather than sheep that occupied the attentions of the back woodsman. But soon the hornies grew so plentiful that they became too cheap. After sending a mob all the way to Sydney the squatter only realised 16s a head. Station hands worked for three half crowns a week and their keep. Old hands still talk of the days when there were 29 boiling down establishments in the colony. That was the first or cattle era.

Then came gold. In 1848 gold was discovered at California, and a few years later in Australia. In 1851 John Bridle, now hale and hearty at 84, won the first half ounce from the Tumut River. At Talbingo, Adelong, and Gobragandra rich alluvial patches were located. Thousands of adventurous miners and prospectors made southwards from Port Jackson. And the underpaid stockmen and drovers joined in the hunt for gold. Station hands were unprocurable at £3 a week, Cattle jumped from 15s to £5 a head.

Then resulted the third or agricultural age. With the establishments of mining townships came a big demand for foodstuffs also. Tumut supplied most of the country side, right to Yackandandah, over the border. It became the granary of New South Wales. It paid handsomely to grow wheat and maize, fruits, and potatoes. Tumut grew and prospered. Broad tree lined thoroughfares were backed by offices, stores, and residences. Picturesque orchards dotted the landscape, and when the first fruit growers' conference was subsequently held in the metropolis, the Tumut delegates presented a collection which put completely in the shade the first fruits of the coast and Cumberland. Farms multiplied until the "plains" were like unto a gigantic chess board.

Dairy farmers followed, and thousands of milkers meandered along the river to their dowlaps deep in the clover feed. In the back country the grazier added his quota to the town's sustenance, and its permanence and solvency were assured. The iron horse connected the town with the metropolis. A butter factory, freezing works, flour mills, and other commercial undertakings arose to testify to the enterprise of the inhabitants.

Then the wisdom of our statesmen and the co-oporatlon of our people saw the dream of a grand united Austialia crystallise into actual fact, and search was made for the capital of the continent. Experts scoured the mother State, as dreamors of old scoured the planet for the "Elixir of Life" or the Philosopher's Stone. In course of time they came to Tumut. They filled their lungs with the fresh invigorating atmosphere. They lifted their eyes to the green clad hills and saw afar off fleecy clouds clinging to the purple mountains. They wandered along the banks of the beautiful Tumut River, and heard the laughter of rippling waters, the sweet wild note of the magpie, the hilarious cachinnation of goburras, and the joyous twitterings of myriad feathered songsters.

They noted the giant poplars, the stately elms and oaks, reminiscent of old England. Luscious old world fruits delighted their epicurean palates. The despised poet of the senses inhaled the scent of new mown hay and the honeyed sweet of wattle bloom and gum. Beyond were the fantastic stalagmitess and stalactites of Yarrangobilly, the wonder of thermal springs, the fern fringed gorges of Jounama, and, loveliest of all, the white veil of laughing water the splashing silver crystals of Buddong Falls.

The senses enjoyed a galaxy of beauty. It was only what was expected when beautiful Tumut was chosen as the ideal site for the capital of Federated Australia Politics, however, is a complex game, in which the players make many strange moves. As the cards were shuffled again and again other sites came uppermost, and Tumut, queen of them all, slippod unnoticed to the bottom of the pack. Wistfully the locals saw the coveted honour-amost within their grasp fade away. But though robbed of the supreme distinction Tumut must over be the resort of the world-weary, the poet, the artist, the sportsman, and the tourist. Not without reason has Tumut been called the prettiest town in Australia. Enthusiasts may sigh for the glory which might have been; but he who has heard the song of the "Out of Doors," and knows the love of forest and fen, will never regret that the peaceful calm of Tumut River has been spared the intrusion of the politician and the demagogue. - (Ref- The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842-1954) Saturday 11 June 1910).

1870 Appointment of ENUMERATORS for the CENSUS.

Gentlemen appointed to be Enumerators under the provisions of the NSW Census Act for 1871. Full list given.

[Government Gazette, 8 December, 1870, p.2731.]

Tumut - Henry HILTON; - (Ref- http://www.dcstechnical.com.au/Rusheen/1.0_People.htm)

1880 - Tumut Certified Denominational Roman Catholic School - Mr Thomas CORCORAN, Teacher.

......................

COUNTRY NEWS - From Our Special Correspondents - TUMUT.

GUNDAGAI ambulance wrote to the Turf Club committee stating they would attend the annual races each day, if possible and asked the club for a donation. Decided to donate £3/3/ to cover the season. The secretary tendered the financial statement for the races held at Xmas time, which showed a profit of £242/8/3.

The programme for the annual races was drawn up. It was decided to alter the distance of the Tumut Handicap from one mile and a quarter to one mile, on account of the sharp turn out of the straight. The prize money was fixed at £320.

To Gilmore Agricultural Bureau, Ambulance Officer Osmond, of Gundagai, wrote offering a cake to be disposed of at the forthcoming hospital and ambulance ball at Gilmore. The balance sheet of the Ferndale school concert showed a credit balance of £6/16/. Collectors for the ball were appointed for the various districts.

Mr. Rupert Masters, building contractor, Tumut, met with a serious accident. He was at Tumbarumba Union Hotel, and walking in his sleep at night, stepped over the balcony and fell 16 feet onto the bumper bar of his car, which he had parked in front of the hotel overnight. The fall was heard by a lady in the hotel. Mr Masters suffered a broken thigh and finger, sprained ankle and abrasions. He was taken to Tumbarumba Hospital.

Master Jack Stuart, messenger at the post office, has been notified of his transfer to Young, where his parents now reside.

Tumut District Cricket Association's Competition. — Catholic Young Men's Society, 174 (L. Cheney 48, Father M Phillips retired 38; W. Adams 2/25), beat Yaven Creek, 114 (E. Pearce 29; Father M' Phillips 4/8, by 60 runs. Wyangle, 5/174 declared (D. Garner retired 55, K. Sheddon 49; D, Wilkinson. 2/33), beat Ten-stoners. (Tumut), 133 (E. Webb 34; K. Sheddon 4/56, D. Garner 3/31), by 41 runs. Gilmore, 5/304 declared (d. Davis not out 167, F. Back 87; J. Whitting 5/28), drew with Whitings-, 9/172 (O. Nean 41, J. Miller 40; J. Back 5/73, P. O'Brien 3/45). Davis compiled the highest score made in the competition this season. Batlow, 315 (C. O'Grady 114, H. Senegal 62; J. Jeffrey 3/48), beat Billiard Room (Tumut), 77 (H. Senegal 3/12, E. Connors 3/31, R. Bryant 4/22), by 238 runs. Tumut Plains forfeited to Adelong:

Mr. W. Clout, of the Bank of New South Wales staff, has been transferred to Coolamon.

Sports were held at Talbingo, funds to be devoted, to the. Spring Flat Hall. The various events resulted: — Pony jump, Mr. Chas. Oddy; cigarette race, Mr. M. Groves; flag race, Mr. C. Oddy; consolation prize, Mr. Ted Groves; stepping the distance, Mr. H. Hinton; ladies nail-driving, Mrs. Freda Oddy. At night a very successful dance was held.

It was decided, by the C.W.A. to leave the appointment of a secretary till a later date. Expressions of regret were made by members regarding the departure of Mrs. Crowburn from the district.

At last Tumut Shire meeting, the estimates for 1938 were fixed as follows:— General rate, 2gd. on the unimproved capital value; water, 5d., with a minimum of 30/; town im provement, 2d.; street lightipg, 1d Total rating for D (town) riding is lOfd. in. the £.

The cycling club asked the Show Society to allot £10 for cycling events at the show, and they would take over the responsibility of running same. It was decided to allot £2/10/ to the club, provided that the club subsidise it with a further £2/10/ and receive all entry fees for the special race, and be responsible for all cycle events. It was decided to hold a dance and euchre party on the second night of the show. The following stewards were appointed for the 1938 show: — Chief stewards, Messrs. A. W. Davis (pavilion), A. A. Curll (ground), C. F. M'Alister (stock) and Jas. Kell (ring); ring master, Col. G. H. L. Harris; horses, Messrs. N. Harris, J. Quirk and V. Harris; beef-cattle, Mr. C. Kell; dairy Shorthorns, Messrs. H. Butler and B. Kell; Jerseys, Messrs. H. Kell and W. Dowling; sheep and wool, Messrs. C. Armstrong, N. Archer and T. Burbury; pigs, Messrs. E. Butler and C. M'Alister; poultry, Mr. R. G. Sturt; farm produce and vegetables, Messrs. R. Sturt, P. Edwards and W. Kell; fruit, Mr. P. E. M'Alister; horticulture, Mr. A. J. Frost; miscellaneous, Mr. R. Quarmby; food and cookery, Mesdames C. Clout and W. Kell and Messrs. C. and J. Clout; dogs,. Mr. R. C. Stevenson; fancy work, Mrs. P. M'Alister, Misses D Quarmby and R. Dowling.

1903 - The Federal Capital Site. (See illustrations on pages 20 and 21.)

A long stretch of dusty road, up one hill and down another, through overlasting gum tree and stringybark, now and again passing Little "cockatoo" homesteads with occasional glimpses of a river away to tho right. The horse lumbers on at a steady jog, the horses knowing to a foot how far it is up each hill, aud pulling doggedly till they got to the top, and then letting her run down the other side.

The air is bright, rarifled, intoxicating, for we are a few thousand feet above tho sea, and there is a dry, sweet scent from the gum trees. Here and there, in the grounds of the farm houses, one notices that the plants are all cold-country species-gooseberries and cherries making a considerable show. But there is nothing also about the road from Gundagai to Tumut that is much different from any other Australian road, until suddenly the coach tops a rise, and there, far away up a vast green flat there is a little white town nestled in under the shelter of a big range. Poplars, willows, maize fields, tobacco plantations, all make up a' green setting for this little white town, that contrasts oddly with the staring, glaring nakedness of the usual Australian township; and as the coach drives up to the town, through the hedges of raspberries and across a river, whose banks are smothered in green herbage, lt scorns as if one had left Australia altogether, and had arrived in some new country.

HOW FOLK LIVE IN TUMUT.

The climate of the town is variable. It can be hot enough in Tumut to suit the most thin blooded Queenslander, and it can be cold enough to nip a Nova Scotian; but, as a rule, the days are crisp and bright, with cool nights, and at tho worst a fairly coal night can always be got by Map Showing Situation of the Federal Capital Site. going a little way up the range. The main attractions of the town as a residence are the river and the hills.

The valley of the Tumut River is one of the richest pieces of land in Australia. It is about two miles broad near the town, and every foot of it is good lucerne land. Tobacco does well shorn, too, but the mainstay of tho town is the fact that it is a distributing centre for a lot of little settlements hidden away in the mountains. There is a little mining done, and occasionally a few fossickers that have struck a patch will come in and wake the town up a bit; but the great standby of Tumut is the money brought in by the "cocky," the small settler who has his 100 acres away up in the mountains, in some parts is rough that pack-horses are not unite extinct yet in the district. All land in the district is very good or very bad, and most of the settlers have a little bit of good river or creek flat, and make it out with pasturage on thc mountains.

THE MOUNTAINEERS. -

Sturdy pioneers those mountaineers are, too. They drive into Tumut at the weekend in weird conveyances that have come down mountain sidings and across fathomless Bullies unharmed; while their horses, with the true swing and action of the mountain horse, pace up and down the streets. They are different from any other Australian settlers, the isolation, the cold climate, and the constant mountain climbing making them a wiry, hard featured lot, more are live and enterprising than the ordinary Australian. It ls said that for its size Tumut sent more men to tho war than any other part of the world.

FURTHER ATTRACTIONS.

Those who know Australia from end to end say that, apart from the attractions of Sydney or Melbourne, they would as soon live in Tumut as in any part of the continent that could be selected. The river is a great standby for rowing, mid trout should do well in its upper waters. A few miles up the mountain are the Yarrangobilly Caves. All round the town are the mountains, at present rapidly being populated by millions of trout; and down the river, are thousands of acres of splendid land, for farms or gardens; so that the legislator who makes his home in Tumut can find sport, sight-seeing, and recreation ready lo lils band, and, judging from tho old men, and the look of the children, there is no more healthy place in Australia.

DRAW DRAWBACK.

There is only one real drawback, and that the distance from everywhere, The Labour members who live on their l'afllainentary pay will probably live Tumut is suitable a place for a capital ii3 could be hit upon. The barrister, who has to attend consultations, and the merchant, who has to conduct his business, will find it an awful strain, dragging up and down the miles of railway to the little mountain, town, It is said that a dνrect line from Tumut to Wagga will yet be made, and this would slow the trip for Melbourne folk a great deal; but the line to Yass, which is the most direct way to Sydney, is almost impossible, the country being very mountainous.

The principal drawback to life in Tumut will be the lack of theatres, amusements, the shopping, and the communication with the outside world, which goes to make life worth living to the busy man.

VIEWS IN THE TUMUT DISTRICT.

The Buddong Falls ck Team on the Road.

The Tumut Rivern Bridge on the Road from Tumut to Gundagai.

1890 - Tumut. April 26. THE WEATHER, - Rain. repeatedly threatens here,; but the clouds pass away without discharging their contents. This afternoon a storm seemed pending, but only a few drops fell. Ploughing is retarded for want of the much-needed moisture, the ground being all too hard. Town street crossings which have not yet been macadamised are ankle-deep in dust.

ROAD CONTRACTS.-Mr. E. Whitley, the contract for for clearing the road from the town to the new Jones's bridge across the Tumut River, has nearly completed his work. The road for a greater part of the distance was covered with stumps and trees. Those have been removed, and when the forming is finished, and one or two bad places which are sad boga in winter, repaired, another pleasant drivo will be afforded to Tumut residents, to Hay nothing of the advantages to the traflic on the Kiandra-road. Mr. G. Goodman, who has the contract for the formidable cutting at Talbingo Hill, was in town this week dispatching his plant and workmen to the scene of operations, and next week a large body of men will begin the cutting.

WATER SCITEΞTE.-At a meeting of the Municipal Council held on Tuesday evening last, Alderman Blakeney proposed that the works committee should bring up a report as to the best plan for a water scheme for the town of Tumut, and the probablo cost of same. The subject was warmly discussed, and the resolution was adopted. Mr. Travers Jones, member for the district, has promised to urge the Minister for Public Works to aid the council in this important matter, and we hope ero long to soe the scheme un accomplished fact.

POLITICAL.- Mr. Travers Jones, M.L.A., has been travelling about his electorate holding meetings in various places. This evening he gave an account of his stewardship to a large body of electors assembled in the Tumut Oddfellow's Hall. The Mayor occupied the chair. Mr. Jones, who was well received, and was surrounded on the platform by some of his chief supporters, spoke on political matters generally, and more particularly in reference to the good things he has managed to secure for his constituents. Mr. Jones believed in fedoration and intercolonial frcotrado, with protection against the outside world. But he pledges himself to support the Government in all useful legislation, and would be one to pass the Local Government Bill and Public Works Bill before meddling with the fiscal polioy of the country. The meeting closed with a vote of confidence accorded to Mr. Jones. - (Ref- Australian Town and Country Journal (NSW : 1870 - 1907)(about) Previous issue Saturday 3 May 1890).

Further HISTORY:

Tumut

Prior to white settlement, Tumut marked the boundary of three separate Aboriginal tribes. To the north lived the Ngunawal, to the south the Walgalu and to the west, the Wiradjuri. During summer tribes came together and journeyed to the highest peaks to feast on the plentiful Bogong moths. The moth?s outline is used today in the Tumut Region Visitor Centre logo.

During the late 1820s settlers pushed down the Murrumbidgee and by 1829 the first pioneers were on the Tumut River.

Land was first settled at Darbalara, close to the junction of the Tumut and Murrumbidgee. During the first 20 years settlement was scattered along the Tumut River,the original settlement being at Mill Angle, at the end of the present showground road, where the first inn was kept by Tim O'Mara.

On the opposite bank a Mr Anderson set up his blacksmith's shop, and here he and a Mr Foord built the first bridge over the river about 1850.

This was the earliest Tumut - wattle and daub and slab-built huts in which dwelt the blacksmiths and teamsters, until a flood in 1852 consolidated the scattered hamlets into one village, and Tumut as it is today, was born.

By 1887 Tumut (a name derived from an Aboriginal word meaning "a quiet resting place by the river") was a municipality; by 1928 it had become the headquarters of the thriving Tumut Shire, which also embraced Adelong and Batlow.

Today the explorers and the pioneers have long gone, but the haunting beauty of the valley remains. People from the original three tribes still live across the Tumut region and perform rituals and ceremonies at important sites to maintain their relationship with the land. Tumut is the hub of a beautiful valley at the foothills of the Snowy Mountains.

With a population of over 6000 the town boasts a modern cosmopolitan shopping centre equal to the best in any town of the same size, excellent social facilities and a large range of fine caravan parks, motels and holiday flats, bed and breakfast establishments, licensed clubs, restaurants and cafes, and a first class Visitor Information Centre to handle all your enquiries on all the things to see and do in the TumutRegion.

Beauty is everywhere - incredibly beautiful parks, famous trees, Adelong's picturesque pastoral scenes, Batlow's glorious orchard country, Yarrangobilly Caves, awe inspiring power stations and lakes of the Snowy Mountains Scheme, enormous stands of pine and hardwood plantations, and the vast Kosciuszko National Park with its abundance of wildlife and flora, unique landscape and snow.

The township provides a wide variety of quality accommodation optionsto make your stay memorable while the wide selection of outlets in the modern shopping centre will be able to meet all your needs.

Historically, there's plenty to reflect Tumut's heritage: magnificent old buildings including the town's churches, courthouse and hotels, its pioneer cemetery on Adelong Road which includes the grave of Thomas Boyd, a member of the Hume and Hovell expedition which passed through Tumut in 1824.

The Tumut Historical Society's museum has fascinating information about farm and domestic items charting the town's pioneering history, superb photos of the region's development and a special display featuring memorabilia of famous Talbingo author, Miles Franklin.

The magnificent mountainuous terrain of the Tumut region has attracted a large field of international female cyclists competing in the Tour De Snowy. This world class event has gained a reputation equal to the Tour De France.

The Festival of the Falling Leaf is celebrated annually in April. Formore up-to-date information, drop in to the Tumut Region Visitor Centre.

(Ref- http://www.smh.com.au/news/New-South-Wales/Tumut/2005/02/17/1108500199641.html).

Note: In Grevilles Directory.

Tumut

Page 511

Distance 259 miles South of Sydney

Mail closes at General Post Office daily 4 pm.

Mail arrives at Post Town daily (Tuesday excepted) 4 pm.

Mail leaves for Sydney daily (Friday excepted) 4 pm.

Mail arrives at Sydney daily 7.15 am.

Route - Rail Goulburn, and coach Adelong, 10m. Tumut.

Ref - http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~hcastle/grevilles/lists/stu/tum.html#tumut

DISTRICT NEWS TUMUT. (From. Our Own Correspondent.)

A farewell and presentation was tendered Miss Ada Bridle prior to her marriage to Mr. C. W. Oddy, of Albury, at the residence of Mr. Jack Oddy, Bowler's Flat. Mr. J. P. Sullivan, J.P., made the presentation (a silver cake basket and silver-mounted biscuit barrel) on behalf of her many friends. Miss Dora Sullivan returned thanks for the bride-elect for the gifts, which would always be looked upon by the recipient as amongst her most valued gifts.

At last. meeting of the local hospital committee, cNurse M. Harrison was appointed junior probationer as from Juno 1; Nurse D. Enright as probationer. Sister Whitlock recommenced her duties on June 8. It was decided to purchase an extra cow, also that a drain be cut and willows planted. Department of Public Health asked for reply to their letter on the subject o-f preventive inoculation of hospital nursing, staff against typhoid.

Gundagai footballers visited Tumut on Sunday, and succeeded in taking back with them the Watt Cup. They won the game by one point only, scores being: — Gundagai, 9; Tumut 8.

At the benefit dance for Mrs. Smith, In the Oddfellow's Hall, Mrs W. Clee (nee Ethel Kemp) suddenly collapsed and became unconscious. She was taken to the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. Kemp, in Merrivale street, where she died the next morning at 5 o'clock without regaining consciousness. She leaves a sorrowing husband and one grown up son. The funeral took place on Sunday, and was one of the longest seen in Tumut. Deceased was only 38 years of age, and very popular with all friends.

A meeting of the Tumut Parents and Citizens' Association was recently held in the Literary Institute. Dr. Clouston presided. Enthusiastic support was given the proposal to form a Junior Forestry League under the direction of Mr. W. de Beuzcville, chief forester. Mr. C. Teasdale was em powered to foster the movement at the school. . The Education Department wrote, stating that modern furniture of the dual desk type could not be installed at Tumut School until tho congestion at the furniture workshops had been relieved.

The Convent ball was held in O'Brien's Hall on Monday night last. There was a splendid attendance, and the hall was beautifully decorated in gold, mauve and purplo streamers. Music was supplied by Miss Bessie Carr's (Gundagai) orchestra, with extras by Misses E. and G. Howitt, of Tumut. A juvenile was held the following night, and equally well patronised.

A benefit dance and euchre party, organised by the Tumut Relief Committee for Mrs. Smith, held in the Oddfellow's Hall, was very successful. The gross takings amounted to £26, of which £20/7/ was sent to Mrs. Smith, the balance being expenses. The chocolate waltz was won by Miss Burg and Mr. N. Stuart. The euchre tournament was won by Mrs. J. Lee and Mr. E. Nuttall. The annual meeting of the Tumut Town Band was held in the Council Chambers on Friday, 11th June. The secretary read his report, and the treasurer presented the balance-sheet which showed the receipts to be: — Street collections, £66/19/2; business house collections, £109/3/6; engagements, £62/6/6; special efforts, £9/8/1; J. M. Herron, £2/1/6; bank interest, £1/7/7; donations, £1/15/; recital in park, £2/8/11; council subsidy (arrears included), £50; Christmas collections, £17/16/; continental, £33/15/; balance brought forward from 1925, £43/6/10; total, £430 8/1. Expenditure. Bandmastor's salary, £231; repairs to instruments, £6/6/10; music, £5/3/10; conveyance of band, £17/10/; advertising,; 6/; stationery' and stamps, etc. £3/6/11^; W. H. Paling and Co., £16/3/8; bank fee and cheque book, £1; medals, £1/7/6; rent bandroom from Wang Loon, £3/4/; installation; electric light in bandroom, £5/10/; insurance on . instruments, £5/5/2; refund to Friendly Society sports, commit too, £4/10/; refreshments for players, 10/; J. J. Learmont, balance on instruments, £31/2/2; special players engaged, £1/10/; continental freight chargo, £15; cartage, 14/7; sundries,-£2/6/7; credit ' balance in bank,-£78/10/9J; total, £430/8/1. The following were' elected members of the citizens committee:— Messrs. T.. Laird, C. Teasdale, E. Senintler, E. Elphick, W. Emery and H. James; council representatives, Aid. J. Elphick (mayor), R. Masters and C. Burt; band representatives, Messrs. G Baker, H. Mount and R. H. Wilkinson. Office-bearers. — President, J. J. Learmont; vice-president, Mr. N. C. Adams; treasurer, Mr. H. Mount; secretary, Mr. R. H. Wilkinson; auditors, Messrs. O. C. Potts and H.Weedon. - (Ref- Albury Banner and Wodonga Express (NSW : 1896 - 1939)(about) Previous issue Friday 2 July 1926 Page 41).

DISTRICT NEWS TUMUT. (From. Our Own Correspondent.)

A farewell and presentation was tendered Miss Ada Bridle prior to her marriage to Mr. C. W. Oddy, of Albury, at the residence of Mr. Jack Oddy, Bowler's Flat. Mr. J. P. Sullivan, J.P., made the presentation (a silver cake basket and silver-mounted biscuit barrel) on behalf of her many friends. Miss Dora Sullivan returned thanks for the bride-elect for the gifts, which would always be looked upon by the recipient as amongst her most valued gifts.

At last. meeting of the local hospital committee, cNurse M. Harrison was appointed junior probationer as from Juno 1; Nurse D. Enright as probationer. Sister Whitlock recommenced her duties on June 8. It was decided to purchase an extra cow, also that a drain be cut and willows planted. Department of Public Health asked for reply to their letter on the subject o-f preventive inoculation of hospital nursing, staff against typhoid.

Gundagai footballers visited Tumut on Sunday, and succeeded in taking back with them the Watt Cup. They won the game by one point only, scores being: — Gundagai, 9; Tumut 8.

At the benefit dance for Mrs. Smith, In the Oddfellow's Hall, Mrs W. Clee (nee Ethel Kemp) suddenly collapsed and became unconscious. She was taken to the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. Kemp, in Merrivale street, where she died the next morning at 5 o'clock without regaining consciousness. She leaves a sorrowing husband and one grown up son. The funeral took place on Sunday, and was one of the longest seen in Tumut. Deceased was only 38 years of age, and very popular with all friends.

A meeting of the Tumut Parents and Citizens' Association was recently held in the Literary Institute. Dr. Clouston presided. Enthusiastic support was given the proposal to form a Junior Forestry League under the direction of Mr. W. de Beuzcville, chief forester. Mr. C. Teasdale was em powered to foster the movement at the school. . The Education Department wrote, stating that modern furniture of the dual desk type could not be installed at Tumut School until tho congestion at the furniture workshops had been relieved.

The Convent ball was held in O'Brien's Hall on Monday night last. There was a splendid attendance, and the hall was beautifully decorated in gold, mauve and purplo streamers. Music was supplied by Miss Bessie Carr's (Gundagai) orchestra, with extras by Misses E. and G. Howitt, of Tumut. A juvenile was held the following night, and equally well patronised.

A benefit dance and euchre party, organised by the Tumut Relief Committee for Mrs. Smith, held in the Oddfellow's Hall, was very successful. The gross takings amounted to £26, of which £20/7/ was sent to Mrs. Smith, the balance being expenses. The chocolate waltz was won by Miss Burg and Mr. N. Stuart. The euchre tournament was won by Mrs. J. Lee and Mr. E. Nuttall. The annual meeting of the Tumut Town Band was held in the Council Chambers on Friday, 11th June. The secretary read his report, and the treasurer presented the balance-sheet which showed the receipts to be: — Street collections, £66/19/2; business house collections, £109/3/6; engagements, £62/6/6; special efforts, £9/8/1; J. M. Herron, £2/1/6; bank interest, £1/7/7; donations, £1/15/; recital in park, £2/8/11; council subsidy (arrears included), £50; Christmas collections, £17/16/; continental, £33/15/; balance brought forward from 1925, £43/6/10; total, £430 8/1. Expenditure. Bandmastor's salary, £231; repairs to instruments, £6/6/10; music, £5/3/10; conveyance of band, £17/10/; advertising,; 6/; stationery' and stamps, etc. £3/6/11^; W. H. Paling and Co., £16/3/8; bank fee and cheque book, £1; medals, £1/7/6; rent bandroom from Wang Loon, £3/4/; installation; electric light in bandroom, £5/10/; insurance on . instruments, £5/5/2; refund to Friendly Society sports, commit too, £4/10/; refreshments for players, 10/; J. J. Learmont, balance on instruments, £31/2/2; special players engaged, £1/10/; continental freight chargo, £15; cartage, 14/7; sundries,-£2/6/7; credit ' balance in bank,-£78/10/9J; total, £430/8/1. The following were' elected members of the citizens committee:— Messrs. T.. Laird, C. Teasdalo, E. Senintler, E. Elphick, W. Emery and H. James; council representatives, Aid. J. Elphick (mayor), R. Masters and C. Burt; band representatives, Messrs. G Baker, H. Mount and R. H. Wilkinson. Office-bearers. — President, J. J. Learmont; vice-president, Mr. N. C. Adams; treasurer, Mr. H. Mount; secretary, Mr. R. H. Wilkinson; auditors, Messrs. O. C. Potts and H.Weedon. - (Ref- Albury Banner and Wodonga Express (NSW : 1896 - 1939)(about) Previous issue Friday 2 July 1926 Page 41).

DISTRICT NEWS TUMUT. (From. Our Own Correspondent.)

A farewell and presentation was tendered Miss Ada Bridle prior to her marriage to Mr. C. W. Oddy, of Albury, at the residence of Mr. Jack Oddy, Bowler's Flat. Mr. J. P. Sullivan, J.P., made the presentation (a silver cake basket and silver-mounted biscuit barrel) on behalf of her many friends. Miss Dora Sullivan returned thanks for the bride-elect for the gifts, which would always be looked upon by the recipient as amongst her most valued gifts.

At last meeting of the local hospital committee, Nurse M. Harrison was appointed junior probationer as from Juno 1; Nurse D. Enright as probationer. Sister Whitlock recommenced her duties on June 8. It was decided to purchase an extra cow, also that a drain be cut and willows planted. Department of Public Health asked for reply to their letter on the subject o-f preventive inoculation of hospital nursing, staff against typhoid.

Gundagai footballers visited Tumut on Sunday, and succeeded in taking back with them the Watt Cup. They won the game by one point only, scores being: — Gundagai, 9; Tumut 8.

At the benefit dance for Mrs. Smith, In the Oddfellow's Hall, Mrs W. Clee (nee Ethel Kemp) suddenly collapsed and became unconscious. She was taken to the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. Kemp, in Merrivale street, where she died the next morning at 5 o'clock without regaining consciousness. She leaves a sorrowing husband and one grown up son. The funeral took place on Sunday, and was one of the longest seen in Tumut. Deceased was only 38 years of age, and very popular with all friends.

A meeting of the Tumut Parents and Citizens' Association was recently held in the Literary Institute. Dr. Clouston presided. Enthusiastic support was given the proposal to form a Junior Forestry League under the direction of Mr. W. de Beuzcville, chief forester. Mr. C. Teasdale was em powered to foster the movement at the school. . The Education Department wrote, stating that modern furniture of the dual desk type could not be installed at Tumut School until tho congestion at the furniture workshops had been relieved.

The Convent ball was held in O'Brien's Hall on Monday night last. There was a splendid attendance, and the hall was beautifully decorated in gold, mauve and purplo streamers. Music was supplied by Miss Bessie Carr's (Gundagai) orchestra, with extras by Misses E. and G. Howitt, of Tumut. A juvenile was held the following night, and equally well patronised.

A benefit dance and euchre party, organised by the Tumut Relief Committee for Mrs. Smith, held in the Oddfellow's Hall, was very successful. The gross takings amounted to £26, of which £20/7/ was sent to Mrs. Smith, the balance being expenses. The chocolate waltz was won by Miss Burg and Mr. N. Stuart. The euchre tournament was won by Mrs. J. Lee and Mr. E. Nuttall. The annual meeting of the Tumut Town Band was held in the Council Chambers on Friday, 11th June. The secretary read his report, and the treasurer presented the balance-sheet which showed the receipts to be: — Street collections, £66/19/2; business house collections, £109/3/6; engagements, £62/6/6; special efforts, £9/8/1; J. M. Herron, £2/1/6; bank interest, £1/7/7; donations, £1/15/; recital in park, £2/8/11; council subsidy (arrears included), £50; Christmas collections, £17/16/; continental, £33/15/; balance brought forward from 1925, £43/6/10; total, £430 8/1. Expenditure. Bandmastor's salary, £231; repairs to instruments, £6/6/10; music, £5/3/10; conveyance of band, £17/10/; advertising,; 6/; stationery' and stamps, etc. £3/6/11^; W. H. Paling and Co., £16/3/8; bank fee and cheque book, £1; medals, £1/7/6; rent bandroom from Wang Loon, £3/4/; installation; electric light in bandroom, £5/10/; insurance on . instruments, £5/5/2; refund to Friendly Society sports, commit too, £4/10/; refreshments for players, 10/; J. J. Learmont, balance on instruments, £31/2/2; special players engaged, £1/10/; continental freight chargo, £15; cartage, 14/7; sundries,-£2/6/7; credit ' balance in bank,-£78/10/9J; total, £430/8/1. The following were' elected members of the citizens committee:— Messrs. T.. Laird, C. Teasdalo, E. Senintler, E. Elphick, W. Emery and H. James; council representatives, Aid. J. Elphick (mayor), R. Masters and C. Burt; band representatives, Messrs. G Baker, H. Mount and R. H. Wilkinson. Office-bearers. — President, J. J. Learmont; vice-president, Mr. N. C. Adams; treasurer, Mr. H. Mount; secretary, Mr. R. H. Wilkinson; auditors, Messrs. O. C. Potts and H.Weedon. - (Ref- Albury Banner and Wodonga Express (NSW : 1896 - 1939)(about) Previous issue Friday 2 July 1926 Page 41).

....

............................

The fastest way from Tumut to Canberra is via Gundagai and the Hume Highway. The most interesting route is across the mountains via Brindabella. While this road is perfectly adequate for conventional vehicles in dry weather it is not advised in wet weather or after an extended period of wet weather. There is a fairly substantial stretch of dirt road characterised by clay soil which can become difficult. Otherwise the journey is characterised by beautiful scenery and it is an opportunity to experience the isolation which was such a feature of Miles Franklin's 'My Brilliant Career'.

The first view shown was that of a map of the district, and the speaker announced that 1 would give a description of a four days' trial commencing at Tumut, visiting tho Yarrangobilly Caves, the. Buddong Falls, and other place of interest in the locality. The views of Tumut were remarkably clear and showed the willow-fringed river and the poplar and elm trees growing by the road which make Tumut what it is- the most Englishs of all Australian towns.. The sights seen on a trip up the Tumut Valley, the maize and tobacco fields, were now shown; then leaving the fertllo valley, the speaker took his audience to the rough mountain streams beloved of the trout fisher the Junima Creek and Yarrangobilly Creek. A short discussion on the trout to be caught was followed by a move on to the mountain country lying between the Tumut, Valley and the Yarrangobilly Caves. The ascent of Talbingo Mourtain by a buggy and pair was described as eay and indeed, that road is a fairly well-known one for motorists. The steep drop down to the Caves requires careful driving, as the road out of the side of a mountain, but with the most ordinary care there is no reason for any trouble in getting down,. Some remarkably good views of the Caves followed, and then the trip up to the Buddong Falls was illustrated by a series of photo graphs.

The photographer who took these views much to be congratulated on his skill in climbing a good point of view from which to secur the most effective picture. The picture of the valley of the Yarrangobilly gave a splended idea, of the great stretch of valley,- the lime stone cliffs, and the dense vegetation that clings to the mountain side. Similarly, the views of the Buddong Fall were taken in such a way as to give the best suggestion of the rush of the water and the rugged hillside down which the creek falls.

The speaker described the various routes to be pursued by tourists in exploring the hills and explained that the Tumut residents were anxious to extend the knowledge of their beautiful district, which, as the address abundant proved, is full of Interest for those who have few days to spare. The speaker was loudly applauded.

The next business was an address by Mr. C F. Lindeman on the subject of fishing for what are known as the perch of our coastal rivers Mr. Lindeman has made perch fishing a specality for many years, and, though it was the first time that he had ever addressed a meeting of any Bort on any subject, he soon shower that he had something interesting to say. Few people are aware that there is a first class fighting fish in Australian waters beside the acclimatised trout. As a rule, the fresh water fish of Australia show little sport, but the perch is an exception. Lying in the decpei pools in the day time, he feeds at the surface and in the shallows in the evening, and at night will rise to an artificial fly, or take a spinner or live bait. Growing to a weight of three or four pounds, the perch shows first-class sport, his rush at the bait, and his determined, straight-away charge when hooked, comparing favorably even with the trout. There art two fresh water perches in our eastern rivers, though the difference is so slight as to be unobservable except by the initiated.

One is known as the fresh water perch (per calates fluvlatllls), while tho other is the estuary perch (percalatoe colonorum). According to Stead's "Fishes of Australia," the estuary perch is often driven by heavy rains out into the salt water, and also come to the salt water for the purpose of spawning; while the fresh water perch lives all the year round In the rivers and pools, and spawns most probably in the fresh water.

It was of this fish that Mr. Lindeman spoke. He stated that 40 years ago he made his first acquaintance with the perch in the Paterson River. The fish were little known, and it was not supposed that they would rise to a fly. Shooting one day in his father's vineyard, he shot a small bird, which fell in a waterhole, and was at once taken down by a perch. He then rigged up a line and hook, and tried baiting with small birds, but the fish never took the hook, though they rose up at and worried the bait. The youthful fisherman had been told that he must on no account allow the hook to protrude, so he had buried it in the body of the bird, and it never had a chance of getting in its deadly work.

He next made an artificial fly with a hook, a bit of rod worsted, and some turkey feathers; and with this primitive weapon he caught a load of fish-the first he thinks that over were caught with the fly in the river, and after many years of experlence, he thinks that there is even now no better thing for perch than the gaudy clumsy worsted and turkey feather. In the early days there were miles of the Patorson River, in any part of which a feed of porch could be caught, but nowadays there are very few to be had. This is described to the waters being fished out, and the small fish destroyed by ignorant or selfish fishermen. He cited an instance of meeting settlor who was carrying a load of 140 perch, none of them more than six inches in length. On remonstrating with the fisherman for taking such small fish, he replied that they were not wasted, as his wife boiled them down for fowl food.

Mr. Lindeman suggested that the Fisheries Deparment better put forward every effort by notices and proclamations, to educate the people to a little self-restraint in the matter of taking small fish, and that if a few prosecutions could be instituted, it might do good.

In answer to questions Mr. Lindeman gave a lot of interesting information as to the habits of the fish, and the best way to catch it. The perch, he explained, is much better eating than, the trout, and equally game, and he thought it a pity that the Australian fish was so be known or protected, while the imported trout were cared for in every possible way.

On the motion of Dr. Brady (chairman), an enthusiastic vote of thanks was accorded to Mr Lindeman for his address. A discussion on fishing followed, and Messrs. Brodie and Dannevig, of the Fisheries' Department, explained that everything possible had been done to make public the laws as to taking undersized fish, but that the public would not come forward and assist by giving evidence, as no one cared to be mixed up with Police court cases.

Mr. R. A. Warden gave some information as to some phenomenal captures of brown trout in New Zealand by a Mr Campbell, who fished at the spot where the river runs into Lake Tokonau. Fishing at night Mr. Campbell caught some enormous fish, one turning the scale at 231b, and a catch of ten fish averaged over 121b a head. A general discussion closed the meeting. - (Ref- Australian Town and Country Journal (NSW : 1870 - 1907)(about) Previous issue Wednesday 29 May 1907).

DISTRICT NEWS TUMUT. (From. Our Own Correspondent.)

A farewell and presentation was tendered Miss Ada Bridle prior to her marriage to Mr. C. W. Oddy, of Albury, at the residence of Mr. Jack Oddy, Bowler's Flat. Mr. J. P. Sullivan, J.P., made the presentation (a silver cake basket and silver-mounted biscuit barrel) on behalf of her many friends. Miss Dora Sullivan returned thanks for the bride-elect for the gifts, which would always be looked upon by the recipient as amongst her most valued gifts.

At last. meeting of the local hospital committee, cNurse M. Harrison was appointed junior probationer as from Juno 1; Nurse D. Enright as probationer. Sister Whitlock recommenced her duties on June 8. It was decided to purchase an extra cow, also that a drain be cut and willows planted. Department of Public Health asked for reply to their letter on the subject o-f preventive inoculation of hospital nursing, staff against typhoid.

Gundagai footballers visited Tumut on Sunday, and succeeded in taking back with them the Watt Cup. They won the game by one point only, scores being: — Gundagai, 9; Tumut 8.

At the benefit dance for Mrs. Smith, In the Oddfellow's Hall, Mrs W. Clee (nee Ethel Kemp) suddenly collapsed and became unconscious. She was taken to the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. Kemp, in Merrivale street, where she died the next morning at 5 o'clock without regaining consciousness. She leaves a sorrowing husband and one grown up son. The funeral took place on Sunday, and was one of the longest seen in Tumut. Deceased was only 38 years of age, and very popular with all friends.

A meeting of the Tumut Parents and Citizens' Association was recently held in the Literary Institute. Dr. Clouston presided. Enthusiastic support was given the proposal to form a Junior Forestry League under the direction of Mr. W. de Beuzcville, chief forester. Mr. C. Teasdale was em powered to foster the movement at the school. . The Education Department wrote, stating that modern furniture of the dual desk type could not be installed at Tumut School until tho congestion at the furniture workshops had been relieved.

The Convent ball was held in O'Brien's Hall on Monday night last. There was a splendid attendance, and the hall was beautifully decorated in gold, mauve and purplo streamers. Music was supplied by Miss Bessie Carr's (Gundagai) orchestra, with extras by Misses E. and G. Howitt, of Tumut. A juvenile was held the following night, and equally well patronised.

A benefit dance and euchre party, organised by the Tumut Relief Committee for Mrs. Smith, held in the Oddfellow's Hall, was very successful. The gross takings amounted to £26, of which £20/7/ was sent to Mrs. Smith, the balance being expenses. The chocolate waltz was won by Miss Burg and Mr. N. Stuart. The euchre tournament was won by Mrs. J. Lee and Mr. E. Nuttall. The annual meeting of the Tumut Town Band was held in the Council Chambers on Friday, 11th June. The secretary read his report, and the treasurer presented the balance-sheet which showed the receipts to be: — Street collections, £66/19/2; business house collections, £109/3/6; engagements, £62/6/6; special efforts, £9/8/1; J. M. Herron, £2/1/6; bank interest, £1/7/7; donations, £1/15/; recital in park, £2/8/11; council subsidy (arrears included), £50; Christmas collections, £17/16/; continental, £33/15/; balance brought forward from 1925, £43/6/10; total, £430 8/1. Expenditure. Bandmastor's salary, £231; repairs to instruments, £6/6/10; music, £5/3/10; conveyance of band, £17/10/; advertising,; 6/; stationery' and stamps, etc. £3/6/11^; W. H. Paling and Co., £16/3/8; bank fee and cheque book, £1; medals, £1/7/6; rent bandroom from Wang Loon, £3/4/; installation; electric light in bandroom, £5/10/; insurance on . instruments, £5/5/2; refund to Friendly Society sports, commit too, £4/10/; refreshments for players, 10/; J. J. Learmont, balance on instruments, £31/2/2; special players engaged, £1/10/; continental freight chargo, £15; cartage, 14/7; sundries,-£2/6/7; credit ' balance in bank,-£78/10/9J; total, £430/8/1. The following were' elected members of the citizens committee:— Messrs. T.. Laird, C. Teasdalo, E. Senintler, E. Elphick, W. Emery and H. James; council representatives, Aid. J. Elphick (mayor), R. Masters and C. Burt; band representatives, Messrs. G Baker, H. Mount and R. H. Wilkinson. Office-bearers. — President, J. J. Learmont; vice-president, Mr. N. C. Adams; treasurer, Mr. H. Mount; secretary, Mr. R. H. Wilkinson; auditors, Messrs. O. C. Potts and H.Weedon. - (Ref- Albury Banner and Wodonga Express (NSW : 1896 - 1939)(about) Previous issue Friday 2 July 1926 Page 41).

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FITZROY STREET

RUSSELL

Among town improvements we may mention that Mr H. Hoad.jun., is about erecting a substantial brick residence in Russell-street, We think it may be assortod that at last Tumut is likely, to have a brass band.

1. Certain members of the Oddfellows have moved so far in the matter as to engage a bandmaster who possesses high credentials. This gentleman Mr H. Hurdnkov Lute of Cooma, arrived in Tumut on Tuesday last. We understand that an soon as the instruments are procured, nine members will commence practice; when the full band is formed it will consist of 13 instruments. A concert is to be Held in Tumut about tbe 25th September. Considering the laudable object in view, we trust the concert will be largely patronised.

2000 ACRES GRILL BRUNGLE

STORES

COMMERCIAL

BEEHIVE

TUMUT. (FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT.) February 16. — In my last communication it was my unpleasant duty to record the burnng of a stack of wheat; on the present occasion I have to notice the accidental burning of a stack of hay containing about 15 tons, the property of Mr Samuel Piper, of Bombolee.

On Friday last, Thomaa Percivel who occupies the adjoining farm, commenced to burn the stubble off his land, and fearing that some accident might take place through the burning stubble, Piper and Percival extinguished the flames and retired for luncheon. During their absence the stubble restarted to burned up and reached the stack of hay before it was observed, burning it completely to the ground.

During the past few months there have been several new buildings in the course of erection and many more are spoken of. This tells well for the prosperity of the district, and the removal of several existing unsightly erections, relics of past times, will add greatly to the appearance of our little town.

Amongst these improvements I note that Mr William Bridle has built a neat little brick cottage in Fitzroy Street, which at present is in the occupation of Mr Bonynge.

That Mr E. A. Fitzgerald has in the course of erection a new brick hotel adjoining tho Horse and Jockey Inn, in Fitzroy street and that Mr G. Todd is about having some brick cottages built on his property opposite Mr William Bridle's, and also in Fitzroy Street.

I have also been favoured with the inspection of a plan, of a magnificent brick building two stories high, which Mr L. Magdelson intends to place on his property opposite the Commercial Store and which when completed will give an imposing appearance to that portion of the town.

Messrs. Edwards Bros are going to erect a brick cottage adjoining their property at the Tumut Steam Mill and Mr George Ellis has built a brick cottage at present in the occupation Mr Wooden, in Capper street.

I consider this list of improvements shows that the monetary depreceation that prevailed in Tumut some years ago has passed away and that a healthier and more prosperous state, of affairs has succeeded.

One cause of this is that the population has become less fluctuating and is steadily increasing. It is an undoubted from that as population, increases in a district the population becomes more wealthy, and bettor satiasfied with their various stations, and realise the fact that apecess in life vis best attained by olose uttentiontoono' definite calling, not by wandering from one location to another.

The miners At Broken-cart reef will be glad to learn that 'Messrs. Edwards Bros, intend immediately to erect a quartz-crushing machine in that locality, which they hope will, be working about two months. This will be a step towards developing tho auriferous country east, of Tumut.

I have been informed that Mesars Murphy and Macnamara havo discovered a very rich quartz leader at Sandy Creek, about two inches wide and now that a crushing machine is about to bo erected in this portion of the district I have no doubt that prospecting for reefs will become a matter of grentor interest. - '

On Wednesday evening a meeting of the Tumut Railway Extension Committee was held at the Woolpack Hotel, to consider the answer returned by Government to the petition from the inhabitants of Tumut, praying for the extension of the Southern railway to the banks of the Murrumhidgee, also to pay for necessary expenses incurred by Mr. R. B. Lynch presided and explained that some delay had occurred in the transmission of the official reply, the other matter was satisfactorily arranged. The Government response acknowledged the receipt' or the Tumnt inemori.il, and stated that the writer was directed hy the Colonial Secretary to state that, without the Government committing itself further to the views of the memorialist!!, sufficient provision has been made1 on the Estimates for 1870 to carry the railway to Yass. I perceive that in tho division that took place in the Legislative Assembly on Friday last, upon the bill introduced by Mr. Buchanan for the purpose of reducing future Governors' salaries, our member voted for this measure.

This is one of the pledges that Mr. Brown made to his constituents previous to his election for this district

Many persons are not aware that from the 14th to the 28th of this month the Electoral Roll for the years 1870-1 is hung up at the Tumut ^/Jourt-hjiniseijiior public, inspection, where all electors who take an interest in the government of their native or adopted country can examine it, and should their names have been inadvertently omitted from its pages they have now an opportunity of having them inserted by making an application tn the Clerk of tho Court; also should any person's name appear on the list who the observer knows is not qualified to vote for the district, he may have it erased on the day of revision by giving notice to that person and to the clerk to that effect.

The tender of Mr. E. A. Fitzgerald has been accepted for the road work between Tumut and Tumut Plains, which will be proceeded with without delay.

Our cricket players are preparing for the game between Tumut and Adelong Clubs, on the Tumut cricket ground, on the 26th instant. The Adelong men are said to bo sanguine that they will recover their laurels on that occasion; but they may find that they have again overrated their strength

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A Tour in the Southern Districts.

Date 2nd March 1889 (BY OUR TRAVELLING CORRESPONDENT.)

TUMUT.

A Tour in the Southern Districts.

(FROM OUR TRAVELLING- CORRESPONDENT.)

COOMA TO ADAMINABY.

COOMA is situated in a hollow, surrounded on the south and west by high ranges, and on the east and north hills close the view. It cannot be called a pretty town, and, in that respect, will not favour ably compare with Bombala. On entering the town, the first building of importance that catches the eye is the hospital, built of dark granite, lt is not very large, but, I am happy to say, suffi ciently extensive for the district. The gaol has, within the last few months, been turned to better use, having been made into an asylum for lunatics. The building is commodious, and appears to answer all requirements. I must compliment the superintendent for the scrupulously clean aopear ance of every department. The patients, number ing some sixty-five, had a healthy appearance, and it is hoped will derive a benefit from the change from Gladesville. It would have been an advan tage, had the recreation grounds been larger. Close to the asylum is the court-house, now having some additions made to it. Near to this is seen the commencement of the new Post and Telegraph office, which is to be built of dark granite,*abuudance of which is easily obtained in the neighbourhood. This edifice will take close on two years before completion at the present rate of progress. From the plans kindly shown me it will both be an ornament and much wanted office. The Catholic chapel is in a forward state, and stands on a commanding rise. The two most tasteful buildings in the town are the English church and the public school, the latter under the charge of Mr. Gale. The school building reflects great credit on the local board, as also the Council for its completeness. I had the pleasure of hear ing the pupils at their lessons, and must certainly say I was surprised at the proficiency shown by them, not only in one particular branch, but in all. Mr. Gale must have been very painstaking to have them so far advanced. The township shows signs that some few years ago business must have been very flourishing, but latterly things have not. been as formerly. This is partly accounted forby,the fact that most of the ready money goes ,; into thι Lands Office for selections. In the course of time business will naturally revivo, when the selectors have cleared off their liabilities. I learn that the amount paid into the

Land Office weekly averages something like i £800 ; a large sum to disappear out of the district. As showing some of the wealth of Monaro, Ο may mention that in round numbers 600,000 sheep are registered in the police district of Cooma alone, There are several good stores in the town, which are those of Mr. Lazarus, Mr. W. B. Carey, Mr. Solomon, all in the general line, and who appear to do a good trade. Mr. Margoschis has a fine stock of jewellery, and is the only watchmaker in the place. Mr. H. Thornton, cabinetmaker, has a show-room filled with upholstery of all kinds, and of the best descriptions, and can, at very short notice, furnish a house complete. The hotels muster largely ; the Prince of Wales, by Mr. M. Lucy (at which I located myself during my visit), is well worth patronising, the liquors and comes tables being excellent, combined with civility and attention. There is also the Cooma Hotel, in tho hands of Mr. G. Cohen, while Mr. W. B. Cohen carries on the Australian, and Mr. Harrison has the Commercial. All these buildings are substantial; but there are several tumble-down domiciles scattered over the town ship. The Commercial and New South Wales Banks have each a branch. At the new year a School of Arts; is to be commenced, the contract for which has already been taken. Some £400 is now in hand, and with the Government subsidy ought to put up a respectable building on the piece of ground granted them near the courthouse. The post and telegraph offices are in charge of Mr. Kirwan and assistants, and a busy time they have of it, as some ninety odd mails are received and despatched during the week, arriving and depart ing at all hours of the twenty-four. There might have been greater taste displayed than is shown in the private residences around Cooma. Horti culture is decidedly at a discount, with the excep tion of one or two who have a few pot plants. As to vegetation, Cooma depends upon the " Heathen Chinee." Half a mile from Cooma proper, over the hill, is the Royal Hotel belonging to Mrs. Hains, stand ing almost alone in its glory. I am given to understand that Government planned out the township here, but the public preferred the present site. Four miles from Cooma, on the Adaminaby road, is Pine Valley Hotel, owned and kept by Mr. Stewart. The proprietor intends, at theend of the year, relinquishing business and confining himself to grazing and farming pursuits, having 600 acres purchased laud besides some 3000 leased, upon which he has 5000 sheep. Shearing commenced last week in the grease, and promises to turn out well. Continuing along the main road, I pass by Cool ringdon run, the property of Messrs. A. and. D. Ryrie. The huinestead is situated three miles off the "road, and 10 miles from Cooma. The land over which I passed is very stony in some places, affording only poor feed, but in between the Hills the grass is more plentiful. Adjoining Coolring don is Mr. HasselPs property, running some dis- : tance along the road. I observed in my ride that . several selections must have changed ownership, ' as there aro only the remnants of the hut and ira provements left. . The road from Mr. Hassell's for tho next six miles passes through a heit of timber, the land being of poor quality. After leaving this belt ! emerged into a valley fringed on both sides with ranges of timber and scrub. This valley, ten miles in length/leads up to Adaminaby. The' township is placed on tho side of a hill, and from a distance has quite an imposing look, which, however, on a closer ncquaiutanco is hardly realised. There aro three or four stores in the - town. Tho iirst on entering belongs to Mr. H. Barrett, with a good stock of goods to select from. Gloso to this is tho Rose Inn, the proprietor being Mr. Geo. Barrett, -who also has a fine selection a little distance out. Further along the street on the opposite side is Mr. Melville's hotel, replete with all good cheer fer travellers. At the end of the township is Mr. Gaulwny's Commercial Hotel, only a short time re-opened by the obliging pro prietor.

Several selections have been taken up around Adaminaby, leaving little of the original run re maining. Mr. John Mackay has a purchased pro perty of 300 acres of fair average quality land, besides a selection of 200 acres. Mr. W. Eccleston's selection is four miles away, and contains an ex cellent paddock of wheat. Tho cereal appears to grow to great advantage this season in this locality. At the time of my visit the cultivation paddocks around Adaminaby looked far more green and healthy than those of any other part of Monaro, the dry season suiting tho land better than a wet one.

ADAMINABY TO GEGEDZERICK.

Making a circuit by way of Gegedzerick, tho road trends through a valley thirteen miles long, at an angle of 25° to the one I entered Adaminaby by. Along the valley, of narrow proportions, some few selections have been taken up, and about ten miles up it is Mr. Delaney's, who kindly proffered me refreshment, of which I availed myself. At the end of the valley I again entered the tirnbor, and a two-mile ride brought me to Middling Bank Station, belonging to M. Byrne, Esq., who has only within the last three months become tho proprietor of this estate, which contains somo 14,000 acres. The owner was busy with his shear ing, but only 1400 sheep were undergoing the operation this season. It is the owner's intention to fully stock the run for the future. A rido of twelve miles through poor forest land, and I arrived at sunset at Mr. lt. Evans's, whose is the largest selection around Gegedzeriek, having 30O0 acres secured, besides 7000 acres leasehold. . Upon this estate some 5000 sheep have been grazing, and these were, at the time of my visit, passing through the process of washing, which put a different complexion on their good fleeces. The Hock I saw yarded were only two and three toothed, and, taken as a whole, could hardly be sur passed-not a crawler to be seen. Lambing has been very good, coming up to 91 per cent. Shear ing was to commence on the following Monday in a very commodious shed near the house. This shed contains all the usual appliances requisito for the purpose, with an excellent wool press. Mr. Evans was very fortunate during the last seasons with his stock, travelling them into tho mountains twenty miles off, to the very place in which a million or more sheep from all parts of Riverina were snowed up and such sad havoc made among them before they were extricated.. Mr. Evans has accumulated his present wealth during the last fourteen years by his own energy and perseverance, and intends, during next year, completing a resi dence moro in accordance with his position. To the host and hostess I return my thanks for their kindness during my stay. A short distance up tho creek is a nice selection, belonging to Mr. Jones, but only having been lately taken up, not many improvements have been lnndo.

Adjoining Mr. Evans's property is Kiah Lake Station, which last August passed into the hands of Mr. Gunning. A fine stone house, with garden in front, stands in the home paddock. This run of 20,000 acres, 3000 of which are secured, is nothing like stocked, as only somo 5000 sheep will bo shorn this season at Mr. Evans's shed. The woolshed bolonging to the estate was burnt down, and the new one is not completed. There is somo good land around, with fattening properties, and Mr. Gunning, no doubt, will amply avail himself of its opportunities from his practical knowledge of sheep-farming, From Kiah Lake the road leads into good open country, and a two mile cauter brought me to Ber ridale store and post-office, of Gegedzerick, owned and conducted by Mr. Oliver, who is also the pos sessor of a large aroa of land around. Mr. Oliver being from home, I could glean no particulars. Continuing my way two miles further, I came upon Mr. Granville's selection, who has evidently made tho most of its capabilities. A very fine paddock of wheat of even growth is first met with', and from its promising appearance ought to return handsomely. A neat stone residence stands along side tho road, with garden on both sides. Taking a cross road from Mr. Glanville's for a mile, I came upon tho main one leading to Wool way, distant some 2½ miles by a fair track. Haif a-mile before reaching the homestead it comes in view, and a charming spot it looks. Woolway belongs to Mr. Pryce, and is of very old standing. The residenco is surrounded by gardens, green house, &c, the whole enclosed by acacia and elderberry trees, which, being now in full bloom, gave the place as picturesque an aspect as any I had visited on Monaro. The land, though stony, alfords good pasture for sheep, and some 12,000 will bo shorn this year, but whether in tho grease or not had not definitely been decided upon. A good six-mile ride brought me to Bobundarrah. ,

The General Assembly of the Victorian Presby terian Church met at Melbourne last Tuesday.^ In the course of the proceedings Dr. Morrison submitted the report of the committee on affiliated colleges, recommending that the church should, with out any delay, proceed to tho erection of an affiliated college on the ground set apart for that purpoBO at the University, and that the sum of £10,000 be raised with that view. The building to serve the following objects :-A college of residence for students attends ing the University, and a theological hall for the training of students for the ministry, The report was adopted,- (Ref- Australian Town and Country Journal (Sydney, NSW : 1870 - 1907)(about) Previous issue Saturday 1 December 1877 Next issue Previous Page No. 23).

DISTRICT NEWS TUMUT. (From. Our Own Correspondent.)

A farewell and presentation was tendered Miss Ada Bridle prior to her marriage to Mr. C. W. Oddy, of Albury, at the residence of Mr. Jack Oddy, Bowler's Flat. Mr. J. P. Sullivan, J.P., made the presentation (a silver cake basket and silver-mounted biscuit barrel) on behalf of her many friends. Miss Dora Sullivan returned thanks for the bride-elect for the gifts, which would always be looked upon by the recipient as amongst her most valued gifts.

At last. meeting of the local hospital committee, cNurse M. Harrison was appointed junior probationer as from Juno 1; Nurse D. Enright as probationer. Sister Whitlock recommenced her duties on June 8. It was decided to purchase an extra cow, also that a drain be cut and willows planted. Department of Public Health asked for reply to their letter on the subject o-f preventive inoculation of hospital nursing, staff against typhoid.

Gundagai footballers visited Tumut on Sunday, and succeeded in taking back with them the Watt Cup. They won the game by one point only, scores being: — Gundagai, 9; Tumut 8.

At the benefit dance for Mrs. Smith, In the Oddfellow's Hall, Mrs W. Clee (nee Ethel Kemp) suddenly collapsed and became unconscious. She was taken to the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. Kemp, in Merrivale street, where she died the next morning at 5 o'clock without regaining consciousness. She leaves a sorrowing husband and one grown up son. The funeral took place on Sunday, and was one of the longest seen in Tumut. Deceased was only 38 years of age, and very popular with all friends.

A meeting of the Tumut Parents and Citizens' Association was recently held in the Literary Institute. Dr. Clouston presided. Enthusiastic support was given the proposal to form a Junior Forestry League under the direction of Mr. W. de Beuzcville, chief forester. Mr. C. Teasdale was em powered to foster the movement at the school. . The Education Department wrote, stating that modern furniture of the dual desk type could not be installed at Tumut School until tho congestion at the furniture workshops had been relieved.

The Convent ball was held in O'Brien's Hall on Monday night last. There was a splendid attendance, and the hall was beautifully decorated in gold, mauve and purplo streamers. Music was supplied by Miss Bessie Carr's (Gundagai) orchestra, with extras by Misses E. and G. Howitt, of Tumut. A juvenile was held the following night, and equally well patronised.

A benefit dance and euchre party, organised by the Tumut Relief Committee for Mrs. Smith, held in the Oddfellow's Hall, was very successful. The gross takings amounted to £26, of which £20/7/ was sent to Mrs. Smith, the balance being expenses. The chocolate waltz was won by Miss Burg and Mr. N. Stuart. The euchre tournament was won by Mrs. J. Lee and Mr. E. Nuttall. The annual meeting of the Tumut Town Band was held in the Council Chambers on Friday, 11th June. The secretary read his report, and the treasurer presented the balance-sheet which showed the receipts to be: — Street collections, £66/19/2; business house collections, £109/3/6; engagements, £62/6/6; special efforts, £9/8/1; J. M. Herron, £2/1/6; bank interest, £1/7/7; donations, £1/15/; recital in park, £2/8/11; council subsidy (arrears included), £50; Christmas collections, £17/16/; continental, £33/15/; balance brought forward from 1925, £43/6/10; total, £430 8/1. Expenditure. Bandmastor's salary, £231; repairs to instruments, £6/6/10; music, £5/3/10; conveyance of band, £17/10/; advertising,; 6/; stationery' and stamps, etc. £3/6/11^; W. H. Paling and Co., £16/3/8; bank fee and cheque book, £1; medals, £1/7/6; rent bandroom from Wang Loon, £3/4/; installation; electric light in bandroom, £5/10/; insurance on . instruments, £5/5/2; refund to Friendly Society sports, commit too, £4/10/; refreshments for players, 10/; J. J. Learmont, balance on instruments, £31/2/2; special players engaged, £1/10/; continental freight chargo, £15; cartage, 14/7; sundries,-£2/6/7; credit ' balance in bank,-£78/10/9J; total, £430/8/1. The following were' elected members of the citizens committee:— Messrs. T.. Laird, C. Teasdalo, E. Senintler, E. Elphick, W. Emery and H. James; council representatives, Aid. J. Elphick (mayor), R. Masters and C. Burt; band representatives, Messrs. G Baker, H. Mount and R. H. Wilkinson. Office-bearers. — President, J. J. Learmont; vice-president, Mr. N. C. Adams; treasurer, Mr. H. Mount; secretary, Mr. R. H. Wilkinson; auditors, Messrs. O. C. Potts and H.Weedon. - (Ref- Albury Banner and Wodonga Express (NSW : 1896 - 1939)(about) Previous issue Friday 2 July 1926 Page 41)

This report is submitted in good faith. All endeavours have been made to make all entries authentic and correct. For any corrections and additional valuable information, maps and photos you may have please contact John

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Go where you will in search of landscape beauty-the rugged grandeur of the Blue Mountains, the soft, rolling plains of Bathurst, or the silver-lined and green-bordered sea- scapes of the south coast,' where the blue of the ocean is so intense-there is nothing to surpass the panorama from Hospital Hill. Tumut. It is not merely the ever-changing play of colour along the hillsides which makes this picture so enchanting. Alternating shadow patches of purple and gold are thrown on the landscape screen when the sky is flecked with fleecy clouds. On bright, sunny days in springtime it is all shining green, with mauve and grey shadings along the ridges. There is beauty, too, in the gentle contour of the tree-topped slopes, which is balm to the heart of an artist.

Away to the south lhere is another note of majestic splendour, where the frowning blue cliffs of Talbingo Range look down. In the middle foreground runs the willow-lined river, snow-fed and gushing over rapids until it spreads out below the township into a silver stream.

But through all is the dominant note of the poplars. They divide the landscape into a series of splendid pictures, each complete in Itself and suitably framed. First, the poplars of Bombowlee, just over the bridge, known and discussed wherever tree-lovers gather-for their height and girth. Like giant sentinels they stand, and their scintillating leaves can be seen far and wide.

More poplars are seen to right and left, some in groups, singles, and long files of them dividing paddocks. Poplars harmonise with the slender church steeple, giving an English setting, poplars along the hills and flats until they meit into a hazy blue distance, way out towards Brungle and Gundagai.

There is an old world atmosphere about it all, and both the green of the springtime or the burning lights of autumn seem to belong to older climes. Certainly, it is something alien to the rest of the State. Softness and colour blending are the keynotes. But it is the poplars which are Indelibly imprinted on the mind. Their call will not remain unanswered. - (Ref- The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842-1954) Saturday 10 December 1938).

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TUMUT [FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT.] - The showers which fell throughout this district towards the end of last month inspired people with the hope that the drought had broken up; but since then we have experienced dry warm weather, with occasional strong westerly winds. These have had the effect of carrying off the rain clouds, and of drying up all surface moisture in the soil. On Thursday night there was a slight frost. The state of the weather is causing general uneasiness. A bush fire is burning in the ranges to the south of the town.

As the arrangements made by the Hon. James Hoskins necessitated his leaving Tumut earlier than his friends expected, the dinner which was to have taken place on Friday was dispensed with. For the same reason Mr. Hoskins was unable to accept several private invitations. After his re-election the hon. gentleman lunched with a number of his constituents.

On Wednesday evening last, a numerously attended meeting was held at Mr. Quilty's Commercial Hotel, for the purpose of distributing the prizes awarded at the late show of the Tumut Agricultural and Pastoral Association; the president, Mr. E. G. Brown, occupied the chair. The secretary, Mr. H. C. Tingcombe, informed those present that the prize list amounted to £114 18s., which sum had been paid out of the funds of the association, while only subscriptions from 101 members had been received; still their financial position was good, and when the money promised by the Government was received they would be in quite a prosperous condition. In his opinion, the judges at the late show, if they had not in every instance decided to the satisfaction of exhibitors, had at least acted in a very liberal spirit ; and he thought, for the future, it would be well that where there was only a single exhibit in a class no prize should be given, but that would a matter for the members to consider. Mr. H. Hoad, of Bombowlee, was the largest prize-taker. Mr. J. Allatt, who carried off the prize for the best plough made in the district, and whose exhibits generally were of a high order, came in for a share of applause.

On the motion of Mr. H. Hoad, seconded by Mr. N. Emanuel, it was agreed that the ploughing match should be held on the 16th May next.

It was also decided, that the bull and stallion show shall take place in September following. Ere the meeting closed votes of thanks to the secretary, treasurer, and other officers of the society were carried with acclamation. The chairman pointed out that the association was greatly indebted to those gentlemen who had come long distances to fill the office of judge at the show, and who had striven to do justice to all with the strictest impartiality.

Beautiful town nestled in the Tumut Valley at the foothills of the Snowy Mountains. By any measure Tumut is an exceptionally pretty country town. The Tumut River, which runs for 145 km before joining the Murrumbidgee River at Gundagai, flows along the edge of the town; the plains spread out on either side of the river; and the foothills of the Snowy Mountains rise on all sides. The rainfall ensures that, apart from times of drought, the valley is characteristically green and fertile.

BEAUTIFUL TUMUT. - (BY O.H.)

"A thing of beauty is a joy for ever." When that "thing" is a thriving country town, with delightful environs, it becomes not only a joy to local resident and immigrant, but a prolific source of revenue. Who shall say that it was not this very beauty, apart from the abundance of marsupials, which many years ago led the neighbourling kings from Murrumbidgee, Monaro, and Bombowlie to assemble their people at Doomut.

As this historic meeting of monarchs there were no reportors present. Neither were any minutes taken of the subsequent conference. But the last of the Doomut tribe, who drifted to Brungle, talked big of the great assemblage. The talk-sticks had been sent round the mountains and up the winding streams which splashed merrily over the shallows on their way to the Bidgee. Then when the southern moon grew to fullness, the tribes assembled at the rendezvous. The reception of delegates, or corroboree, was a grand affair, over 500 participating. So also was the subsequent banquet. But the proceedings terminated rather abruptly. A buck from Monaro, entranced with the charms of a Fish River maiden, desired her for his lubra. She scorned the foreign yoke, so the Monaro brave, following the time-honoured custom, stunned her with a blow from his waddy. The blow was heard a hundred yards off. It was heard by a young Fish River warrior, whose mia mia the young malden had promised to grace. So the Fish River black protested with a boomorang. Monaro replied with a spear. There was a division. Spears, boomerangs, and other missiles darkened the air. Pandemonium reigned. The young gin primarily responsible for the fracas slumbered peacefully. The Doomut King, who had presided at the function, failed to restore order, and the gathering dispersed. The rather meagre details procurable from old Brungal Tommy do not include the number of killed and wounded.

After the visitors had departed the local blacks lived in peace and quiet at Doomut, which, being translated, is "The Camping Place." Stringy-bark humpies were raised. Fish in abundance came from the river, while in the ranges the warriors found kangaroo, wallaby, and bears. But soon the white man came from "over the ranges," and encroached on the happy hunting grounds of the aboriginals.

Cattle took the place of the marsupial on all the country round Doomut and Bombowlee. The blacks thinned out, and the last of the tribe migrated to Brungal. King Tommy for years held sway along the banks of the little creek that rushes and tumbles down between the mountains.

A medal presented in 1812 by Mr. John Keighren, the original owner of Brungle, was proudly worn by the old monarch. But Tommy's end is shrouded in mystery. Tradition has it that he was speared in a fight with some raiding natives from Yass. A less picturesque but more probable story is that he and 50 of his tribe were wiped out by an influenza epidemic, which decimated the tribes in the Upper Murrumbidgee. But two years ago King Tommy's old brass medal was unearthed at Brungle, as it is now spelt. Here at the Mission Station, in charge of Mr. Hubbard, the remaining aboriginals of the district are located. When Christmas cheer comes round the population of the settlement reaches well over a hundred. Ordinarily it is about 80. And those are not by any means the degenerate blacks that one meets on the bends of the outback rivers. They are great athletes, holding their own at cricket and football, and pulling off many prizes at district sports meetings. They do all the cultivating at the station, and some of the men can plough and furrow with the best farmers of the district.

Reverting to Tumut, as the old camping place came to be called, it was 1848 before the district was settled sufficiently to warrant the visit of the Government surveyors who laid out the town. A courthouse and lockup of gum slabs and bark, with a mounted trooper and black tracker, stood as the symbols of law and order and British justice.

Postmaster and School master Hilton looked after her Majesty's mails in his spare time, inculcated into the currency lads and lasses some of the rudiments of the three R's.

On the fertile Tumut "plains" were then settled the Shellys,

Whitty and Blowering,

Anderson and Foord occupied Tumut station;

Wilkinson selected Yallowin, and

Broughton held Gadara,

while a Rankin squatted at Bombowlee.

It was cattle rather than sheep that occupied the attentions of the back woodsman. But soon the hornies grew so plentiful that they became too cheap. After sending a mob all the way to Sydney the squatter only realised 16s a head. Station hands worked for three half crowns a week and their keep. Old hands still talk of the days when there were 29 boiling down establishments in the colony. That was the first or cattle era.

Then came gold. In 1848 gold was discovered at California, and a few years later in Australia. In 1851 John Bridle, now hale and hearty at 84, won the first half ounce from the Tumut River. At Talbingo, Adelong, and Gobragandra rich alluvial patches were located. Thousands of adventurous miners and prospectors made southwards from Port Jackson. And the underpaid stockmen and drovers joined in the hunt for gold. Station hands were unprocurable at £3 a week, Cattle jumped from 15s to £5 a head.

Then resulted the third or agricultural age. With the establishments of mining townships came a big demand for foodstuffs also. Tumut supplied most of the country side, right to Yackandandah, over the border. It became the granary of New South Wales. It paid handsomely to grow wheat and maize, fruits, and potatoes. Tumut grew and prospered. Broad tree lined thoroughfares were backed by offices, stores, and residences. Picturesque orchards dotted the landscape, and when the first fruit growers' conference was subsequently held in the metropolis, the Tumut delegates presented a collection which put completely in the shade the first fruits of the coast and Cumberland. Farms multiplied until the "plains" were like unto a gigantic chess board.

Dairy farmers followed, and thousands of milkers meandered along the river to their dowlaps deep in the clover feed. In the back country the grazier added his quota to the town's sustenance, and its permanence and solvency were assured. The iron horse connected the town with the metropolis. A butter factory, freezing works, flour mills, and other commercial undertakings arose to testify to the enterprise of the inhabitants.

Then the wisdom of our statesmen and the co-oporatlon of our people saw the dream of a grand united Austialia crystallise into actual fact, and search was made for the capital of the continent. Experts scoured the mother State, as dreamors of old scoured the planet for the "Elixir of Life" or the Philosopher's Stone. In course of time they came to Tumut. They filled their lungs with the fresh invigorating atmosphere. They lifted their eyes to the green clad hills and saw afar off fleecy clouds clinging to the purple mountains. They wandered along the banks of the beautiful Tumut River, and heard the laughter of rippling waters, the sweet wild note of the magpie, the hilarious cachinnation of goburras, and the joyous twitterings of myriad feathered songsters.

They noted the giant poplars, the stately elms and oaks, reminiscent of old England. Luscious old world fruits delighted their epicurean palates. The despised poet of the senses inhaled the scent of new mown hay and the honeyed sweet of wattle bloom and gum. Beyond were the fantastic stalagmitess and stalactites of Yarrangobilly, the wonder of thermal springs, the fern fringed gorges of Jounama, and, loveliest of all, the white veil of laughing water the splashing silver crystals of Buddong Falls.

The senses enjoyed a galaxy of beauty. It was only what was expected when beautiful Tumut was chosen as the ideal site for the capital of Federated Australia Politics, however, is a complex game, in which the players make many strange moves. As the cards were shuffled again and again other sites came uppermost, and Tumut, queen of them all, slippod unnoticed to the bottom of the pack. Wistfully the locals saw the coveted honour-amost within their grasp fade away. But though robbed of the supreme distinction Tumut must over be the resort of the world-weary, the poet, the artist, the sportsman, and the tourist. Not without reason has Tumut been called the prettiest town in Australia. Enthusiasts may sigh for the glory which might have been; but he who has heard the song of the "Out of Doors," and knows the love of forest and fen, will never regret that the peaceful calm of Tumut River has been spared the intrusion of the politician and the demagogue. - (Ref- The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842-1954) Saturday 11 June 1910).

1870 Appointment of ENUMERATORS for the CENSUS.

Gentlemen appointed to be Enumerators under the provisions of the NSW Census Act for 1871. Full list given.

[Government Gazette, 8 December, 1870, p.2731.]

Tumut - Henry HILTON; - (Ref- http://www.dcstechnical.com.au/Rusheen/1.0_People.htm)

1880 - Tumut Certified Denominational Roman Catholic School - Mr Thomas CORCORAN, Teacher.

BEAUTIFUL TUMUT. - (BY O.H.)

"A thing of beauty is a joy for ever." When that "thing" is a thriving country town, with delightful environs, it becomes not only a joy to local resident and immigrant, but a prolific source of revenue. Who shall say that it was not this very beauty, apart from the abundance of marsupials, which many years ago led the neighbourling kings from Murrumbidgee, Monaro, and Bombowlie to assemble their people at Doomut.

As this historic meeting of monarchs there were no reportors present. Neither were any minutes taken of the subsequent conference. But the last of the Doomut tribe, who drifted to Brungle, talked big of the great assemblage. The talk-sticks had been sent round the mountains and up the winding streams which splashed merrily over the shallows on their way to the Bidgee. Then when the southern moon grew to fullness, the tribes assembled at the rendezvous. The reception of delegates, or corroboree, was a grand affair, over 500 participating. So also was the subsequent banquet. But the proceedings terminated rather abruptly. A buck from Monaro, entranced with the charms of a Fish River maiden, desired her for his lubra. She scorned the foreign yoke, so the Monaro brave, following the time-honoured custom, stunned her with a blow from his waddy. The blow was heard a hundred yards off. It was heard by a young Fish River warrior, whose mia mia the young malden had promised to grace. So the Fish River black protested with a boomorang. Monaro replied with a spear. There was a division. Spears, boomerangs, and other missiles darkened the air. Pandemonium reigned. The young gin primarily responsible for the fracas slumbered peacefully. The Doomut King, who had presided at the function, failed to restore order, and the gathering dispersed. The rather meagre details procurable from old Brungal Tommy do not include the number of killed and wounded.

After the visitors had departed the local blacks lived in peace and quiet at Doomut, which, being translated, is "The Camping Place." Stringy-bark humpies were raised. Fish in abundance came from the river, while in the ranges the warriors found kangaroo, wallaby, and bears. But soon the white man came from "over the ranges," and encroached on the happy hunting grounds of the aboriginals.

Cattle took the place of the marsupial on all the country round Doomut and Bombowlee. The blacks thinned out, and the last of the tribe migrated to Brungal. King Tommy for years held sway along the banks of the little creek that rushes and tumbles down between the mountains.

A medal presented in 1812 by Mr. John Keighren, the original owner of Brungle, was proudly worn by the old monarch. But Tommy's end is shrouded in mystery. Tradition has it that he was speared in a fight with some raiding natives from Yass. A less picturesque but more probable story is that he and 50 of his tribe were wiped out by an influenza epidemic, which decimated the tribes in the Upper Murrumbidgee. But two years ago King Tommy's old brass medal was unearthed at Brungle, as it is now spelt. Here at the Mission Station, in charge of Mr. Hubbard, the remaining aboriginals of the district are located. When Christmas cheer comes round the population of the settlement reaches well over a hundred. Ordinarily it is about 80. And those are not by any means the degenerate blacks that one meets on the bends of the outback rivers. They are great athletes, holding their own at cricket and football, and pulling off many prizes at district sports meetings. They do all the cultivating at the station, and some of the men can plough and furrow with the best farmers of the district.

Reverting to Tumut, as the old camping place came to be called, it was 1848 before the district was settled sufficiently to warrant the visit of the Government surveyors who laid out the town. A courthouse and lockup of gum slabs and bark, with a mounted trooper and black tracker, stood as the symbols of law and order and British justice.

Postmaster and School master Hilton looked after her Majesty's mails in his spare time, inculcated into the currency lads and lasses some of the rudiments of the three R's.

On the fertile Tumut "plains" were then settled the Shellys,

Whitty and Blowering,

Anderson and Foord occupied Tumut station;

Wilkinson selected Yallowin, and

Broughton held Gadara,

while a Rankin squatted at Bombowlee.

It was cattle rather than sheep that occupied the attentions of the back woodsman. But soon the hornies grew so plentiful that they became too cheap. After sending a mob all the way to Sydney the squatter only realised 16s a head. Station hands worked for three half crowns a week and their keep. Old hands still talk of the days when there were 29 boiling down establishments in the colony. That was the first or cattle era.

Then came gold. In 1848 gold was discovered at California, and a few years later in Australia. In 1851 John Bridle, now hale and hearty at 84, won the first half ounce from the Tumut River. At Talbingo, Adelong, and Gobragandra rich alluvial patches were located. Thousands of adventurous miners and prospectors made southwards from Port Jackson. And the underpaid stockmen and drovers joined in the hunt for gold. Station hands were unprocurable at £3 a week, Cattle jumped from 15s to £5 a head.

Then resulted the third or agricultural age. With the establishments of mining townships came a big demand for foodstuffs also. Tumut supplied most of the country side, right to Yackandandah, over the border. It became the granary of New South Wales. It paid handsomely to grow wheat and maize, fruits, and potatoes. Tumut grew and prospered. Broad tree lined thoroughfares were backed by offices, stores, and residences. Picturesque orchards dotted the landscape, and when the first fruit growers' conference was subsequently held in the metropolis, the Tumut delegates presented a collection which put completely in the shade the first fruits of the coast and Cumberland. Farms multiplied until the "plains" were like unto a gigantic chess board.

Dairy farmers followed, and thousands of milkers meandered along the river to their dowlaps deep in the clover feed. In the back country the grazier added his quota to the town's sustenance, and its permanence and solvency were assured. The iron horse connected the town with the metropolis. A butter factory, freezing works, flour mills, and other commercial undertakings arose to testify to the enterprise of the inhabitants.

Then the wisdom of our statesmen and the co-oporatlon of our people saw the dream of a grand united Austialia crystallise into actual fact, and search was made for the capital of the continent. Experts scoured the mother State, as dreamors of old scoured the planet for the "Elixir of Life" or the Philosopher's Stone. In course of time they came to Tumut. They filled their lungs with the fresh invigorating atmosphere. They lifted their eyes to the green clad hills and saw afar off fleecy clouds clinging to the purple mountains. They wandered along the banks of the beautiful Tumut River, and heard the laughter of rippling waters, the sweet wild note of the magpie, the hilarious cachinnation of goburras, and the joyous twitterings of myriad feathered songsters.

They noted the giant poplars, the stately elms and oaks, reminiscent of old England. Luscious old world fruits delighted their epicurean palates. The despised poet of the senses inhaled the scent of new mown hay and the honeyed sweet of wattle bloom and gum. Beyond were the fantastic stalagmitess and stalactites of Yarrangobilly, the wonder of thermal springs, the fern fringed gorges of Jounama, and, loveliest of all, the white veil of laughing water the splashing silver crystals of Buddong Falls.

The senses enjoyed a galaxy of beauty. It was only what was expected when beautiful Tumut was chosen as the ideal site for the capital of Federated Australia Politics, however, is a complex game, in which the players make many strange moves. As the cards were shuffled again and again other sites came uppermost, and Tumut, queen of them all, slippod unnoticed to the bottom of the pack. Wistfully the locals saw the coveted honour-amost within their grasp fade away. But though robbed of the supreme distinction Tumut must over be the resort of the world-weary, the poet, the artist, the sportsman, and the tourist. Not without reason has Tumut been called the prettiest town in Australia. Enthusiasts may sigh for the glory which might have been; but he who has heard the song of the "Out of Doors," and knows the love of forest and fen, will never regret that the peaceful calm of Tumut River has been spared the intrusion of the politician and the demagogue. - (Ref- The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842-1954) Saturday 11 June 1910).

1870 Appointment of ENUMERATORS for the CENSUS.

Gentlemen appointed to be Enumerators under the provisions of the NSW Census Act for 1871. Full list given.

[Government Gazette, 8 December, 1870, p.2731.]

Tumut - Henry HILTON; - (Ref- http://www.dcstechnical.com.au/Rusheen/1.0_People.htm)

1880 - Tumut Certified Denominational Roman Catholic School - Mr Thomas CORCORAN, Teacher.

......................

COUNTRY NEWS - From Our Special Correspondents - TUMUT.

GUNDAGAI ambulance wrote to the Turf Club committee stating they would attend the annual races each day, if possible and asked the club for a donation. Decided to donate £3/3/ to cover the season. The secretary tendered the financial statement for the races held at Xmas time, which showed a profit of £242/8/3.

The programme for the annual races was drawn up. It was decided to alter the distance of the Tumut Handicap from one mile and a quarter to one mile, on account of the sharp turn out of the straight. The prize money was fixed at £320.

To Gilmore Agricultural Bureau, Ambulance Officer Osmond, of Gundagai, wrote offering a cake to be disposed of at the forthcoming hospital and ambulance ball at Gilmore. The balance sheet of the Ferndale school concert showed a credit balance of £6/16/. Collectors for the ball were appointed for the various districts.

Mr. Rupert Masters, building contractor, Tumut, met with a serious accident. He was at Tumbarumba Union Hotel, and walking in his sleep at night, stepped over the balcony and fell 16 feet onto the bumper bar of his car, which he had parked in front of the hotel overnight. The fall was heard by a lady in the hotel. Mr Masters suffered a broken thigh and finger, sprained ankle and abrasions. He was taken to Tumbarumba Hospital.

Master Jack Stuart, messenger at the post office, has been notified of his transfer to Young, where his parents now reside.

Tumut District Cricket Association's Competition. — Catholic Young Men's Society, 174 (L. Cheney 48, Father M Phillips retired 38; W. Adams 2/25), beat Yaven Creek, 114 (E. Pearce 29; Father M' Phillips 4/8, by 60 runs. Wyangle, 5/174 declared (D. Garner retired 55, K. Sheddon 49; D, Wilkinson. 2/33), beat Ten-stoners. (Tumut), 133 (E. Webb 34; K. Sheddon 4/56, D. Garner 3/31), by 41 runs. Gilmore, 5/304 declared (d. Davis not out 167, F. Back 87; J. Whitting 5/28), drew with Whitings-, 9/172 (O. Nean 41, J. Miller 40; J. Back 5/73, P. O'Brien 3/45). Davis compiled the highest score made in the competition this season. Batlow, 315 (C. O'Grady 114, H. Senegal 62; J. Jeffrey 3/48), beat Billiard Room (Tumut), 77 (H. Senegal 3/12, E. Connors 3/31, R. Bryant 4/22), by 238 runs. Tumut Plains forfeited to Adelong:

Mr. W. Clout, of the Bank of New South Wales staff, has been transferred to Coolamon.

Sports were held at Talbingo, funds to be devoted, to the. Spring Flat Hall. The various events resulted: — Pony jump, Mr. Chas. Oddy; cigarette race, Mr. M. Groves; flag race, Mr. C. Oddy; consolation prize, Mr. Ted Groves; stepping the distance, Mr. H. Hinton; ladies nail-driving, Mrs. Freda Oddy. At night a very successful dance was held.

It was decided, by the C.W.A. to leave the appointment of a secretary till a later date. Expressions of regret were made by members regarding the departure of Mrs. Crowburn from the district.

At last Tumut Shire meeting, the estimates for 1938 were fixed as follows:— General rate, 2gd. on the unimproved capital value; water, 5d., with a minimum of 30/; town im provement, 2d.; street lightipg, 1d Total rating for D (town) riding is lOfd. in. the £.

The cycling club asked the Show Society to allot £10 for cycling events at the show, and they would take over the responsibility of running same. It was decided to allot £2/10/ to the club, provided that the club subsidise it with a further £2/10/ and receive all entry fees for the special race, and be responsible for all cycle events. It was decided to hold a dance and euchre party on the second night of the show. The following stewards were appointed for the 1938 show: — Chief stewards, Messrs. A. W. Davis (pavilion), A. A. Curll (ground), C. F. M'Alister (stock) and Jas. Kell (ring); ring master, Col. G. H. L. Harris; horses, Messrs. N. Harris, J. Quirk and V. Harris; beef-cattle, Mr. C. Kell; dairy Shorthorns, Messrs. H. Butler and B. Kell; Jerseys, Messrs. H. Kell and W. Dowling; sheep and wool, Messrs. C. Armstrong, N. Archer and T. Burbury; pigs, Messrs. E. Butler and C. M'Alister; poultry, Mr. R. G. Sturt; farm produce and vegetables, Messrs. R. Sturt, P. Edwards and W. Kell; fruit, Mr. P. E. M'Alister; horticulture, Mr. A. J. Frost; miscellaneous, Mr. R. Quarmby; food and cookery, Mesdames C. Clout and W. Kell and Messrs. C. and J. Clout; dogs,. Mr. R. C. Stevenson; fancy work, Mrs. P. M'Alister, Misses D Quarmby and R. Dowling.

1903 - The Federal Capital Site. (See illustrations on pages 20 and 21.)

A long stretch of dusty road, up one hill and down another, through overlasting gum tree and stringybark, now and again passing Little "cockatoo" homesteads with occasional glimpses of a river away to tho right. The horse lumbers on at a steady jog, the horses knowing to a foot how far it is up each hill, aud pulling doggedly till they got to the top, and then letting her run down the other side.

The air is bright, rarifled, intoxicating, for we are a few thousand feet above tho sea, and there is a dry, sweet scent from the gum trees. Here and there, in the grounds of the farm houses, one notices that the plants are all cold-country species-gooseberries and cherries making a considerable show. But there is nothing also about the road from Gundagai to Tumut that is much different from any other Australian road, until suddenly the coach tops a rise, and there, far away up a vast green flat there is a little white town nestled in under the shelter of a big range. Poplars, willows, maize fields, tobacco plantations, all make up a' green setting for this little white town, that contrasts oddly with the staring, glaring nakedness of the usual Australian township; and as the coach drives up to the town, through the hedges of raspberries and across a river, whose banks are smothered in green herbage, lt scorns as if one had left Australia altogether, and had arrived in some new country.

HOW FOLK LIVE IN TUMUT.

The climate of the town is variable. It can be hot enough in Tumut to suit the most thin blooded Queenslander, and it can be cold enough to nip a Nova Scotian; but, as a rule, the days are crisp and bright, with cool nights, and at tho worst a fairly coal night can always be got by Map Showing Situation of the Federal Capital Site. going a little way up the range. The main attractions of the town as a residence are the river and the hills.

The valley of the Tumut River is one of the richest pieces of land in Australia. It is about two miles broad near the town, and every foot of it is good lucerne land. Tobacco does well shorn, too, but the mainstay of tho town is the fact that it is a distributing centre for a lot of little settlements hidden away in the mountains. There is a little mining done, and occasionally a few fossickers that have struck a patch will come in and wake the town up a bit; but the great standby of Tumut is the money brought in by the "cocky," the small settler who has his 100 acres away up in the mountains, in some parts is rough that pack-horses are not unite extinct yet in the district. All land in the district is very good or very bad, and most of the settlers have a little bit of good river or creek flat, and make it out with pasturage on thc mountains.

THE MOUNTAINEERS. -

Sturdy pioneers those mountaineers are, too. They drive into Tumut at the weekend in weird conveyances that have come down mountain sidings and across fathomless Bullies unharmed; while their horses, with the true swing and action of the mountain horse, pace up and down the streets. They are different from any other Australian settlers, the isolation, the cold climate, and the constant mountain climbing making them a wiry, hard featured lot, more are live and enterprising than the ordinary Australian. It ls said that for its size Tumut sent more men to tho war than any other part of the world.

FURTHER ATTRACTIONS.

Those who know Australia from end to end say that, apart from the attractions of Sydney or Melbourne, they would as soon live in Tumut as in any part of the continent that could be selected. The river is a great standby for rowing, mid trout should do well in its upper waters. A few miles up the mountain are the Yarrangobilly Caves. All round the town are the mountains, at present rapidly being populated by millions of trout; and down the river, are thousands of acres of splendid land, for farms or gardens; so that the legislator who makes his home in Tumut can find sport, sight-seeing, and recreation ready lo lils band, and, judging from tho old men, and the look of the children, there is no more healthy place in Australia.

DRAW DRAWBACK.

There is only one real drawback, and that the distance from everywhere, The Labour members who live on their l'afllainentary pay will probably live Tumut is suitable a place for a capital ii3 could be hit upon. The barrister, who has to attend consultations, and the merchant, who has to conduct his business, will find it an awful strain, dragging up and down the miles of railway to the little mountain, town, It is said that a dνrect line from Tumut to Wagga will yet be made, and this would slow the trip for Melbourne folk a great deal; but the line to Yass, which is the most direct way to Sydney, is almost impossible, the country being very mountainous.

The principal drawback to life in Tumut will be the lack of theatres, amusements, the shopping, and the communication with the outside world, which goes to make life worth living to the busy man.

VIEWS IN THE TUMUT DISTRICT.

The Buddong Falls ck Team on the Road.

The Tumut Rivern Bridge on the Road from Tumut to Gundagai.

1890 - Tumut. April 26. THE WEATHER, - Rain. repeatedly threatens here,; but the clouds pass away without discharging their contents. This afternoon a storm seemed pending, but only a few drops fell. Ploughing is retarded for want of the much-needed moisture, the ground being all too hard. Town street crossings which have not yet been macadamised are ankle-deep in dust.

ROAD CONTRACTS.-Mr. E. Whitley, the contract for for clearing the road from the town to the new Jones's bridge across the Tumut River, has nearly completed his work. The road for a greater part of the distance was covered with stumps and trees. Those have been removed, and when the forming is finished, and one or two bad places which are sad boga in winter, repaired, another pleasant drivo will be afforded to Tumut residents, to Hay nothing of the advantages to the traflic on the Kiandra-road. Mr. G. Goodman, who has the contract for the formidable cutting at Talbingo Hill, was in town this week dispatching his plant and workmen to the scene of operations, and next week a large body of men will begin the cutting.

WATER SCITEΞTE.-At a meeting of the Municipal Council held on Tuesday evening last, Alderman Blakeney proposed that the works committee should bring up a report as to the best plan for a water scheme for the town of Tumut, and the probablo cost of same. The subject was warmly discussed, and the resolution was adopted. Mr. Travers Jones, member for the district, has promised to urge the Minister for Public Works to aid the council in this important matter, and we hope ero long to soe the scheme un accomplished fact.

POLITICAL.- Mr. Travers Jones, M.L.A., has been travelling about his electorate holding meetings in various places. This evening he gave an account of his stewardship to a large body of electors assembled in the Tumut Oddfellow's Hall. The Mayor occupied the chair. Mr. Jones, who was well received, and was surrounded on the platform by some of his chief supporters, spoke on political matters generally, and more particularly in reference to the good things he has managed to secure for his constituents. Mr. Jones believed in fedoration and intercolonial frcotrado, with protection against the outside world. But he pledges himself to support the Government in all useful legislation, and would be one to pass the Local Government Bill and Public Works Bill before meddling with the fiscal polioy of the country. The meeting closed with a vote of confidence accorded to Mr. Jones. - (Ref- Australian Town and Country Journal (NSW : 1870 - 1907)(about) Previous issue Saturday 3 May 1890).

Further HISTORY:

Tumut

Prior to white settlement, Tumut marked the boundary of three separate Aboriginal tribes. To the north lived the Ngunawal, to the south the Walgalu and to the west, the Wiradjuri. During summer tribes came together and journeyed to the highest peaks to feast on the plentiful Bogong moths. The moth?s outline is used today in the Tumut Region Visitor Centre logo.

During the late 1820s settlers pushed down the Murrumbidgee and by 1829 the first pioneers were on the Tumut River.

Land was first settled at Darbalara, close to the junction of the Tumut and Murrumbidgee. During the first 20 years settlement was scattered along the Tumut River,the original settlement being at Mill Angle, at the end of the present showground road, where the first inn was kept by Tim O'Mara.

On the opposite bank a Mr Anderson set up his blacksmith's shop, and here he and a Mr Foord built the first bridge over the river about 1850.

This was the earliest Tumut - wattle and daub and slab-built huts in which dwelt the blacksmiths and teamsters, until a flood in 1852 consolidated the scattered hamlets into one village, and Tumut as it is today, was born.

By 1887 Tumut (a name derived from an Aboriginal word meaning "a quiet resting place by the river") was a municipality; by 1928 it had become the headquarters of the thriving Tumut Shire, which also embraced Adelong and Batlow.

Today the explorers and the pioneers have long gone, but the haunting beauty of the valley remains. People from the original three tribes still live across the Tumut region and perform rituals and ceremonies at important sites to maintain their relationship with the land. Tumut is the hub of a beautiful valley at the foothills of the Snowy Mountains.

With a population of over 6000 the town boasts a modern cosmopolitan shopping centre equal to the best in any town of the same size, excellent social facilities and a large range of fine caravan parks, motels and holiday flats, bed and breakfast establishments, licensed clubs, restaurants and cafes, and a first class Visitor Information Centre to handle all your enquiries on all the things to see and do in the TumutRegion.

Beauty is everywhere - incredibly beautiful parks, famous trees, Adelong's picturesque pastoral scenes, Batlow's glorious orchard country, Yarrangobilly Caves, awe inspiring power stations and lakes of the Snowy Mountains Scheme, enormous stands of pine and hardwood plantations, and the vast Kosciuszko National Park with its abundance of wildlife and flora, unique landscape and snow.

The township provides a wide variety of quality accommodation optionsto make your stay memorable while the wide selection of outlets in the modern shopping centre will be able to meet all your needs.

Historically, there's plenty to reflect Tumut's heritage: magnificent old buildings including the town's churches, courthouse and hotels, its pioneer cemetery on Adelong Road which includes the grave of Thomas Boyd, a member of the Hume and Hovell expedition which passed through Tumut in 1824.

The Tumut Historical Society's museum has fascinating information about farm and domestic items charting the town's pioneering history, superb photos of the region's development and a special display featuring memorabilia of famous Talbingo author, Miles Franklin.

The magnificent mountainuous terrain of the Tumut region has attracted a large field of international female cyclists competing in the Tour De Snowy. This world class event has gained a reputation equal to the Tour De France.

The Festival of the Falling Leaf is celebrated annually in April. Formore up-to-date information, drop in to the Tumut Region Visitor Centre.

(Ref- http://www.smh.com.au/news/New-South-Wales/Tumut/2005/02/17/1108500199641.html).

Note: In Grevilles Directory.

Tumut

Page 511

Distance 259 miles South of Sydney

Mail closes at General Post Office daily 4 pm.

Mail arrives at Post Town daily (Tuesday excepted) 4 pm.

Mail leaves for Sydney daily (Friday excepted) 4 pm.

Mail arrives at Sydney daily 7.15 am.

Route - Rail Goulburn, and coach Adelong, 10m. Tumut.

Ref - http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~hcastle/grevilles/lists/stu/tum.html#tumut

DISTRICT NEWS TUMUT. (From. Our Own Correspondent.)

A farewell and presentation was tendered Miss Ada Bridle prior to her marriage to Mr. C. W. Oddy, of Albury, at the residence of Mr. Jack Oddy, Bowler's Flat. Mr. J. P. Sullivan, J.P., made the presentation (a silver cake basket and silver-mounted biscuit barrel) on behalf of her many friends. Miss Dora Sullivan returned thanks for the bride-elect for the gifts, which would always be looked upon by the recipient as amongst her most valued gifts.

At last. meeting of the local hospital committee, cNurse M. Harrison was appointed junior probationer as from Juno 1; Nurse D. Enright as probationer. Sister Whitlock recommenced her duties on June 8. It was decided to purchase an extra cow, also that a drain be cut and willows planted. Department of Public Health asked for reply to their letter on the subject o-f preventive inoculation of hospital nursing, staff against typhoid.

Gundagai footballers visited Tumut on Sunday, and succeeded in taking back with them the Watt Cup. They won the game by one point only, scores being: — Gundagai, 9; Tumut 8.

At the benefit dance for Mrs. Smith, In the Oddfellow's Hall, Mrs W. Clee (nee Ethel Kemp) suddenly collapsed and became unconscious. She was taken to the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. Kemp, in Merrivale street, where she died the next morning at 5 o'clock without regaining consciousness. She leaves a sorrowing husband and one grown up son. The funeral took place on Sunday, and was one of the longest seen in Tumut. Deceased was only 38 years of age, and very popular with all friends.

A meeting of the Tumut Parents and Citizens' Association was recently held in the Literary Institute. Dr. Clouston presided. Enthusiastic support was given the proposal to form a Junior Forestry League under the direction of Mr. W. de Beuzcville, chief forester. Mr. C. Teasdale was em powered to foster the movement at the school. . The Education Department wrote, stating that modern furniture of the dual desk type could not be installed at Tumut School until tho congestion at the furniture workshops had been relieved.

The Convent ball was held in O'Brien's Hall on Monday night last. There was a splendid attendance, and the hall was beautifully decorated in gold, mauve and purplo streamers. Music was supplied by Miss Bessie Carr's (Gundagai) orchestra, with extras by Misses E. and G. Howitt, of Tumut. A juvenile was held the following night, and equally well patronised.

A benefit dance and euchre party, organised by the Tumut Relief Committee for Mrs. Smith, held in the Oddfellow's Hall, was very successful. The gross takings amounted to £26, of which £20/7/ was sent to Mrs. Smith, the balance being expenses. The chocolate waltz was won by Miss Burg and Mr. N. Stuart. The euchre tournament was won by Mrs. J. Lee and Mr. E. Nuttall. The annual meeting of the Tumut Town Band was held in the Council Chambers on Friday, 11th June. The secretary read his report, and the treasurer presented the balance-sheet which showed the receipts to be: — Street collections, £66/19/2; business house collections, £109/3/6; engagements, £62/6/6; special efforts, £9/8/1; J. M. Herron, £2/1/6; bank interest, £1/7/7; donations, £1/15/; recital in park, £2/8/11; council subsidy (arrears included), £50; Christmas collections, £17/16/; continental, £33/15/; balance brought forward from 1925, £43/6/10; total, £430 8/1. Expenditure. Bandmastor's salary, £231; repairs to instruments, £6/6/10; music, £5/3/10; conveyance of band, £17/10/; advertising,; 6/; stationery' and stamps, etc. £3/6/11^; W. H. Paling and Co., £16/3/8; bank fee and cheque book, £1; medals, £1/7/6; rent bandroom from Wang Loon, £3/4/; installation; electric light in bandroom, £5/10/; insurance on . instruments, £5/5/2; refund to Friendly Society sports, commit too, £4/10/; refreshments for players, 10/; J. J. Learmont, balance on instruments, £31/2/2; special players engaged, £1/10/; continental freight chargo, £15; cartage, 14/7; sundries,-£2/6/7; credit ' balance in bank,-£78/10/9J; total, £430/8/1. The following were' elected members of the citizens committee:— Messrs. T.. Laird, C. Teasdale, E. Senintler, E. Elphick, W. Emery and H. James; council representatives, Aid. J. Elphick (mayor), R. Masters and C. Burt; band representatives, Messrs. G Baker, H. Mount and R. H. Wilkinson. Office-bearers. — President, J. J. Learmont; vice-president, Mr. N. C. Adams; treasurer, Mr. H. Mount; secretary, Mr. R. H. Wilkinson; auditors, Messrs. O. C. Potts and H.Weedon. - (Ref- Albury Banner and Wodonga Express (NSW : 1896 - 1939)(about) Previous issue Friday 2 July 1926 Page 41).

DISTRICT NEWS TUMUT. (From. Our Own Correspondent.)

A farewell and presentation was tendered Miss Ada Bridle prior to her marriage to Mr. C. W. Oddy, of Albury, at the residence of Mr. Jack Oddy, Bowler's Flat. Mr. J. P. Sullivan, J.P., made the presentation (a silver cake basket and silver-mounted biscuit barrel) on behalf of her many friends. Miss Dora Sullivan returned thanks for the bride-elect for the gifts, which would always be looked upon by the recipient as amongst her most valued gifts.

At last. meeting of the local hospital committee, cNurse M. Harrison was appointed junior probationer as from Juno 1; Nurse D. Enright as probationer. Sister Whitlock recommenced her duties on June 8. It was decided to purchase an extra cow, also that a drain be cut and willows planted. Department of Public Health asked for reply to their letter on the subject o-f preventive inoculation of hospital nursing, staff against typhoid.

Gundagai footballers visited Tumut on Sunday, and succeeded in taking back with them the Watt Cup. They won the game by one point only, scores being: — Gundagai, 9; Tumut 8.

At the benefit dance for Mrs. Smith, In the Oddfellow's Hall, Mrs W. Clee (nee Ethel Kemp) suddenly collapsed and became unconscious. She was taken to the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. Kemp, in Merrivale street, where she died the next morning at 5 o'clock without regaining consciousness. She leaves a sorrowing husband and one grown up son. The funeral took place on Sunday, and was one of the longest seen in Tumut. Deceased was only 38 years of age, and very popular with all friends.

A meeting of the Tumut Parents and Citizens' Association was recently held in the Literary Institute. Dr. Clouston presided. Enthusiastic support was given the proposal to form a Junior Forestry League under the direction of Mr. W. de Beuzcville, chief forester. Mr. C. Teasdale was em powered to foster the movement at the school. . The Education Department wrote, stating that modern furniture of the dual desk type could not be installed at Tumut School until tho congestion at the furniture workshops had been relieved.

The Convent ball was held in O'Brien's Hall on Monday night last. There was a splendid attendance, and the hall was beautifully decorated in gold, mauve and purplo streamers. Music was supplied by Miss Bessie Carr's (Gundagai) orchestra, with extras by Misses E. and G. Howitt, of Tumut. A juvenile was held the following night, and equally well patronised.

A benefit dance and euchre party, organised by the Tumut Relief Committee for Mrs. Smith, held in the Oddfellow's Hall, was very successful. The gross takings amounted to £26, of which £20/7/ was sent to Mrs. Smith, the balance being expenses. The chocolate waltz was won by Miss Burg and Mr. N. Stuart. The euchre tournament was won by Mrs. J. Lee and Mr. E. Nuttall. The annual meeting of the Tumut Town Band was held in the Council Chambers on Friday, 11th June. The secretary read his report, and the treasurer presented the balance-sheet which showed the receipts to be: — Street collections, £66/19/2; business house collections, £109/3/6; engagements, £62/6/6; special efforts, £9/8/1; J. M. Herron, £2/1/6; bank interest, £1/7/7; donations, £1/15/; recital in park, £2/8/11; council subsidy (arrears included), £50; Christmas collections, £17/16/; continental, £33/15/; balance brought forward from 1925, £43/6/10; total, £430 8/1. Expenditure. Bandmastor's salary, £231; repairs to instruments, £6/6/10; music, £5/3/10; conveyance of band, £17/10/; advertising,; 6/; stationery' and stamps, etc. £3/6/11^; W. H. Paling and Co., £16/3/8; bank fee and cheque book, £1; medals, £1/7/6; rent bandroom from Wang Loon, £3/4/; installation; electric light in bandroom, £5/10/; insurance on . instruments, £5/5/2; refund to Friendly Society sports, commit too, £4/10/; refreshments for players, 10/; J. J. Learmont, balance on instruments, £31/2/2; special players engaged, £1/10/; continental freight chargo, £15; cartage, 14/7; sundries,-£2/6/7; credit ' balance in bank,-£78/10/9J; total, £430/8/1. The following were' elected members of the citizens committee:— Messrs. T.. Laird, C. Teasdalo, E. Senintler, E. Elphick, W. Emery and H. James; council representatives, Aid. J. Elphick (mayor), R. Masters and C. Burt; band representatives, Messrs. G Baker, H. Mount and R. H. Wilkinson. Office-bearers. — President, J. J. Learmont; vice-president, Mr. N. C. Adams; treasurer, Mr. H. Mount; secretary, Mr. R. H. Wilkinson; auditors, Messrs. O. C. Potts and H.Weedon. - (Ref- Albury Banner and Wodonga Express (NSW : 1896 - 1939)(about) Previous issue Friday 2 July 1926 Page 41).

DISTRICT NEWS TUMUT. (From. Our Own Correspondent.)

A farewell and presentation was tendered Miss Ada Bridle prior to her marriage to Mr. C. W. Oddy, of Albury, at the residence of Mr. Jack Oddy, Bowler's Flat. Mr. J. P. Sullivan, J.P., made the presentation (a silver cake basket and silver-mounted biscuit barrel) on behalf of her many friends. Miss Dora Sullivan returned thanks for the bride-elect for the gifts, which would always be looked upon by the recipient as amongst her most valued gifts.

At last meeting of the local hospital committee, Nurse M. Harrison was appointed junior probationer as from Juno 1; Nurse D. Enright as probationer. Sister Whitlock recommenced her duties on June 8. It was decided to purchase an extra cow, also that a drain be cut and willows planted. Department of Public Health asked for reply to their letter on the subject o-f preventive inoculation of hospital nursing, staff against typhoid.

Gundagai footballers visited Tumut on Sunday, and succeeded in taking back with them the Watt Cup. They won the game by one point only, scores being: — Gundagai, 9; Tumut 8.

At the benefit dance for Mrs. Smith, In the Oddfellow's Hall, Mrs W. Clee (nee Ethel Kemp) suddenly collapsed and became unconscious. She was taken to the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. Kemp, in Merrivale street, where she died the next morning at 5 o'clock without regaining consciousness. She leaves a sorrowing husband and one grown up son. The funeral took place on Sunday, and was one of the longest seen in Tumut. Deceased was only 38 years of age, and very popular with all friends.

A meeting of the Tumut Parents and Citizens' Association was recently held in the Literary Institute. Dr. Clouston presided. Enthusiastic support was given the proposal to form a Junior Forestry League under the direction of Mr. W. de Beuzcville, chief forester. Mr. C. Teasdale was em powered to foster the movement at the school. . The Education Department wrote, stating that modern furniture of the dual desk type could not be installed at Tumut School until tho congestion at the furniture workshops had been relieved.

The Convent ball was held in O'Brien's Hall on Monday night last. There was a splendid attendance, and the hall was beautifully decorated in gold, mauve and purplo streamers. Music was supplied by Miss Bessie Carr's (Gundagai) orchestra, with extras by Misses E. and G. Howitt, of Tumut. A juvenile was held the following night, and equally well patronised.

A benefit dance and euchre party, organised by the Tumut Relief Committee for Mrs. Smith, held in the Oddfellow's Hall, was very successful. The gross takings amounted to £26, of which £20/7/ was sent to Mrs. Smith, the balance being expenses. The chocolate waltz was won by Miss Burg and Mr. N. Stuart. The euchre tournament was won by Mrs. J. Lee and Mr. E. Nuttall. The annual meeting of the Tumut Town Band was held in the Council Chambers on Friday, 11th June. The secretary read his report, and the treasurer presented the balance-sheet which showed the receipts to be: — Street collections, £66/19/2; business house collections, £109/3/6; engagements, £62/6/6; special efforts, £9/8/1; J. M. Herron, £2/1/6; bank interest, £1/7/7; donations, £1/15/; recital in park, £2/8/11; council subsidy (arrears included), £50; Christmas collections, £17/16/; continental, £33/15/; balance brought forward from 1925, £43/6/10; total, £430 8/1. Expenditure. Bandmastor's salary, £231; repairs to instruments, £6/6/10; music, £5/3/10; conveyance of band, £17/10/; advertising,; 6/; stationery' and stamps, etc. £3/6/11^; W. H. Paling and Co., £16/3/8; bank fee and cheque book, £1; medals, £1/7/6; rent bandroom from Wang Loon, £3/4/; installation; electric light in bandroom, £5/10/; insurance on . instruments, £5/5/2; refund to Friendly Society sports, commit too, £4/10/; refreshments for players, 10/; J. J. Learmont, balance on instruments, £31/2/2; special players engaged, £1/10/; continental freight chargo, £15; cartage, 14/7; sundries,-£2/6/7; credit ' balance in bank,-£78/10/9J; total, £430/8/1. The following were' elected members of the citizens committee:— Messrs. T.. Laird, C. Teasdalo, E. Senintler, E. Elphick, W. Emery and H. James; council representatives, Aid. J. Elphick (mayor), R. Masters and C. Burt; band representatives, Messrs. G Baker, H. Mount and R. H. Wilkinson. Office-bearers. — President, J. J. Learmont; vice-president, Mr. N. C. Adams; treasurer, Mr. H. Mount; secretary, Mr. R. H. Wilkinson; auditors, Messrs. O. C. Potts and H.Weedon. - (Ref- Albury Banner and Wodonga Express (NSW : 1896 - 1939)(about) Previous issue Friday 2 July 1926 Page 41).

....

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The fastest way from Tumut to Canberra is via Gundagai and the Hume Highway. The most interesting route is across the mountains via Brindabella. While this road is perfectly adequate for conventional vehicles in dry weather it is not advised in wet weather or after an extended period of wet weather. There is a fairly substantial stretch of dirt road characterised by clay soil which can become difficult. Otherwise the journey is characterised by beautiful scenery and it is an opportunity to experience the isolation which was such a feature of Miles Franklin's 'My Brilliant Career'.

The first view shown was that of a map of the district, and the speaker announced that 1 would give a description of a four days' trial commencing at Tumut, visiting tho Yarrangobilly Caves, the. Buddong Falls, and other place of interest in the locality. The views of Tumut were remarkably clear and showed the willow-fringed river and the poplar and elm trees growing by the road which make Tumut what it is- the most Englishs of all Australian towns.. The sights seen on a trip up the Tumut Valley, the maize and tobacco fields, were now shown; then leaving the fertllo valley, the speaker took his audience to the rough mountain streams beloved of the trout fisher the Junima Creek and Yarrangobilly Creek. A short discussion on the trout to be caught was followed by a move on to the mountain country lying between the Tumut, Valley and the Yarrangobilly Caves. The ascent of Talbingo Mourtain by a buggy and pair was described as eay and indeed, that road is a fairly well-known one for motorists. The steep drop down to the Caves requires careful driving, as the road out of the side of a mountain, but with the most ordinary care there is no reason for any trouble in getting down,. Some remarkably good views of the Caves followed, and then the trip up to the Buddong Falls was illustrated by a series of photo graphs.

The photographer who took these views much to be congratulated on his skill in climbing a good point of view from which to secur the most effective picture. The picture of the valley of the Yarrangobilly gave a splended idea, of the great stretch of valley,- the lime stone cliffs, and the dense vegetation that clings to the mountain side. Similarly, the views of the Buddong Fall were taken in such a way as to give the best suggestion of the rush of the water and the rugged hillside down which the creek falls.

The speaker described the various routes to be pursued by tourists in exploring the hills and explained that the Tumut residents were anxious to extend the knowledge of their beautiful district, which, as the address abundant proved, is full of Interest for those who have few days to spare. The speaker was loudly applauded.

The next business was an address by Mr. C F. Lindeman on the subject of fishing for what are known as the perch of our coastal rivers Mr. Lindeman has made perch fishing a specality for many years, and, though it was the first time that he had ever addressed a meeting of any Bort on any subject, he soon shower that he had something interesting to say. Few people are aware that there is a first class fighting fish in Australian waters beside the acclimatised trout. As a rule, the fresh water fish of Australia show little sport, but the perch is an exception. Lying in the decpei pools in the day time, he feeds at the surface and in the shallows in the evening, and at night will rise to an artificial fly, or take a spinner or live bait. Growing to a weight of three or four pounds, the perch shows first-class sport, his rush at the bait, and his determined, straight-away charge when hooked, comparing favorably even with the trout. There art two fresh water perches in our eastern rivers, though the difference is so slight as to be unobservable except by the initiated.

One is known as the fresh water perch (per calates fluvlatllls), while tho other is the estuary perch (percalatoe colonorum). According to Stead's "Fishes of Australia," the estuary perch is often driven by heavy rains out into the salt water, and also come to the salt water for the purpose of spawning; while the fresh water perch lives all the year round In the rivers and pools, and spawns most probably in the fresh water.

It was of this fish that Mr. Lindeman spoke. He stated that 40 years ago he made his first acquaintance with the perch in the Paterson River. The fish were little known, and it was not supposed that they would rise to a fly. Shooting one day in his father's vineyard, he shot a small bird, which fell in a waterhole, and was at once taken down by a perch. He then rigged up a line and hook, and tried baiting with small birds, but the fish never took the hook, though they rose up at and worried the bait. The youthful fisherman had been told that he must on no account allow the hook to protrude, so he had buried it in the body of the bird, and it never had a chance of getting in its deadly work.

He next made an artificial fly with a hook, a bit of rod worsted, and some turkey feathers; and with this primitive weapon he caught a load of fish-the first he thinks that over were caught with the fly in the river, and after many years of experlence, he thinks that there is even now no better thing for perch than the gaudy clumsy worsted and turkey feather. In the early days there were miles of the Patorson River, in any part of which a feed of porch could be caught, but nowadays there are very few to be had. This is described to the waters being fished out, and the small fish destroyed by ignorant or selfish fishermen. He cited an instance of meeting settlor who was carrying a load of 140 perch, none of them more than six inches in length. On remonstrating with the fisherman for taking such small fish, he replied that they were not wasted, as his wife boiled them down for fowl food.

Mr. Lindeman suggested that the Fisheries Deparment better put forward every effort by notices and proclamations, to educate the people to a little self-restraint in the matter of taking small fish, and that if a few prosecutions could be instituted, it might do good.

In answer to questions Mr. Lindeman gave a lot of interesting information as to the habits of the fish, and the best way to catch it. The perch, he explained, is much better eating than, the trout, and equally game, and he thought it a pity that the Australian fish was so be known or protected, while the imported trout were cared for in every possible way.

On the motion of Dr. Brady (chairman), an enthusiastic vote of thanks was accorded to Mr Lindeman for his address. A discussion on fishing followed, and Messrs. Brodie and Dannevig, of the Fisheries' Department, explained that everything possible had been done to make public the laws as to taking undersized fish, but that the public would not come forward and assist by giving evidence, as no one cared to be mixed up with Police court cases.

Mr. R. A. Warden gave some information as to some phenomenal captures of brown trout in New Zealand by a Mr Campbell, who fished at the spot where the river runs into Lake Tokonau. Fishing at night Mr. Campbell caught some enormous fish, one turning the scale at 231b, and a catch of ten fish averaged over 121b a head. A general discussion closed the meeting. - (Ref- Australian Town and Country Journal (NSW : 1870 - 1907)(about) Previous issue Wednesday 29 May 1907).

DISTRICT NEWS TUMUT. (From. Our Own Correspondent.)

A farewell and presentation was tendered Miss Ada Bridle prior to her marriage to Mr. C. W. Oddy, of Albury, at the residence of Mr. Jack Oddy, Bowler's Flat. Mr. J. P. Sullivan, J.P., made the presentation (a silver cake basket and silver-mounted biscuit barrel) on behalf of her many friends. Miss Dora Sullivan returned thanks for the bride-elect for the gifts, which would always be looked upon by the recipient as amongst her most valued gifts.

At last. meeting of the local hospital committee, cNurse M. Harrison was appointed junior probationer as from Juno 1; Nurse D. Enright as probationer. Sister Whitlock recommenced her duties on June 8. It was decided to purchase an extra cow, also that a drain be cut and willows planted. Department of Public Health asked for reply to their letter on the subject o-f preventive inoculation of hospital nursing, staff against typhoid.

Gundagai footballers visited Tumut on Sunday, and succeeded in taking back with them the Watt Cup. They won the game by one point only, scores being: — Gundagai, 9; Tumut 8.

At the benefit dance for Mrs. Smith, In the Oddfellow's Hall, Mrs W. Clee (nee Ethel Kemp) suddenly collapsed and became unconscious. She was taken to the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. Kemp, in Merrivale street, where she died the next morning at 5 o'clock without regaining consciousness. She leaves a sorrowing husband and one grown up son. The funeral took place on Sunday, and was one of the longest seen in Tumut. Deceased was only 38 years of age, and very popular with all friends.

A meeting of the Tumut Parents and Citizens' Association was recently held in the Literary Institute. Dr. Clouston presided. Enthusiastic support was given the proposal to form a Junior Forestry League under the direction of Mr. W. de Beuzcville, chief forester. Mr. C. Teasdale was em powered to foster the movement at the school. . The Education Department wrote, stating that modern furniture of the dual desk type could not be installed at Tumut School until tho congestion at the furniture workshops had been relieved.

The Convent ball was held in O'Brien's Hall on Monday night last. There was a splendid attendance, and the hall was beautifully decorated in gold, mauve and purplo streamers. Music was supplied by Miss Bessie Carr's (Gundagai) orchestra, with extras by Misses E. and G. Howitt, of Tumut. A juvenile was held the following night, and equally well patronised.

A benefit dance and euchre party, organised by the Tumut Relief Committee for Mrs. Smith, held in the Oddfellow's Hall, was very successful. The gross takings amounted to £26, of which £20/7/ was sent to Mrs. Smith, the balance being expenses. The chocolate waltz was won by Miss Burg and Mr. N. Stuart. The euchre tournament was won by Mrs. J. Lee and Mr. E. Nuttall. The annual meeting of the Tumut Town Band was held in the Council Chambers on Friday, 11th June. The secretary read his report, and the treasurer presented the balance-sheet which showed the receipts to be: — Street collections, £66/19/2; business house collections, £109/3/6; engagements, £62/6/6; special efforts, £9/8/1; J. M. Herron, £2/1/6; bank interest, £1/7/7; donations, £1/15/; recital in park, £2/8/11; council subsidy (arrears included), £50; Christmas collections, £17/16/; continental, £33/15/; balance brought forward from 1925, £43/6/10; total, £430 8/1. Expenditure. Bandmastor's salary, £231; repairs to instruments, £6/6/10; music, £5/3/10; conveyance of band, £17/10/; advertising,; 6/; stationery' and stamps, etc. £3/6/11^; W. H. Paling and Co., £16/3/8; bank fee and cheque book, £1; medals, £1/7/6; rent bandroom from Wang Loon, £3/4/; installation; electric light in bandroom, £5/10/; insurance on . instruments, £5/5/2; refund to Friendly Society sports, commit too, £4/10/; refreshments for players, 10/; J. J. Learmont, balance on instruments, £31/2/2; special players engaged, £1/10/; continental freight chargo, £15; cartage, 14/7; sundries,-£2/6/7; credit ' balance in bank,-£78/10/9J; total, £430/8/1. The following were' elected members of the citizens committee:— Messrs. T.. Laird, C. Teasdalo, E. Senintler, E. Elphick, W. Emery and H. James; council representatives, Aid. J. Elphick (mayor), R. Masters and C. Burt; band representatives, Messrs. G Baker, H. Mount and R. H. Wilkinson. Office-bearers. — President, J. J. Learmont; vice-president, Mr. N. C. Adams; treasurer, Mr. H. Mount; secretary, Mr. R. H. Wilkinson; auditors, Messrs. O. C. Potts and H.Weedon. - (Ref- Albury Banner and Wodonga Express (NSW : 1896 - 1939)(about) Previous issue Friday 2 July 1926 Page 41).

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FITZROY STREET

RUSSELL

Among town improvements we may mention that Mr H. Hoad.jun., is about erecting a substantial brick residence in Russell-street, We think it may be assortod that at last Tumut is likely, to have a brass band.

1. Certain members of the Oddfellows have moved so far in the matter as to engage a bandmaster who possesses high credentials. This gentleman Mr H. Hurdnkov Lute of Cooma, arrived in Tumut on Tuesday last. We understand that an soon as the instruments are procured, nine members will commence practice; when the full band is formed it will consist of 13 instruments. A concert is to be Held in Tumut about tbe 25th September. Considering the laudable object in view, we trust the concert will be largely patronised.

2000 ACRES GRILL BRUNGLE

STORES

COMMERCIAL

BEEHIVE

TUMUT. (FROM OUR CORRESPONDENT.) February 16. — In my last communication it was my unpleasant duty to record the burnng of a stack of wheat; on the present occasion I have to notice the accidental burning of a stack of hay containing about 15 tons, the property of Mr Samuel Piper, of Bombolee.

On Friday last, Thomaa Percivel who occupies the adjoining farm, commenced to burn the stubble off his land, and fearing that some accident might take place through the burning stubble, Piper and Percival extinguished the flames and retired for luncheon. During their absence the stubble restarted to burned up and reached the stack of hay before it was observed, burning it completely to the ground.

During the past few months there have been several new buildings in the course of erection and many more are spoken of. This tells well for the prosperity of the district, and the removal of several existing unsightly erections, relics of past times, will add greatly to the appearance of our little town.

Amongst these improvements I note that Mr William Bridle has built a neat little brick cottage in Fitzroy Street, which at present is in the occupation of Mr Bonynge.

That Mr E. A. Fitzgerald has in the course of erection a new brick hotel adjoining tho Horse and Jockey Inn, in Fitzroy street and that Mr G. Todd is about having some brick cottages built on his property opposite Mr William Bridle's, and also in Fitzroy Street.

I have also been favoured with the inspection of a plan, of a magnificent brick building two stories high, which Mr L. Magdelson intends to place on his property opposite the Commercial Store and which when completed will give an imposing appearance to that portion of the town.

Messrs. Edwards Bros are going to erect a brick cottage adjoining their property at the Tumut Steam Mill and Mr George Ellis has built a brick cottage at present in the occupation Mr Wooden, in Capper street.

I consider this list of improvements shows that the monetary depreceation that prevailed in Tumut some years ago has passed away and that a healthier and more prosperous state, of affairs has succeeded.

One cause of this is that the population has become less fluctuating and is steadily increasing. It is an undoubted from that as population, increases in a district the population becomes more wealthy, and bettor satiasfied with their various stations, and realise the fact that apecess in life vis best attained by olose uttentiontoono' definite calling, not by wandering from one location to another.

The miners At Broken-cart reef will be glad to learn that 'Messrs. Edwards Bros, intend immediately to erect a quartz-crushing machine in that locality, which they hope will, be working about two months. This will be a step towards developing tho auriferous country east, of Tumut.

I have been informed that Mesars Murphy and Macnamara havo discovered a very rich quartz leader at Sandy Creek, about two inches wide and now that a crushing machine is about to bo erected in this portion of the district I have no doubt that prospecting for reefs will become a matter of grentor interest. - ' On Wednesday evening a meeting of the Tumut Railway Extension Committee was held at the Woolpack Hotel, to consider the answer returned by Government to the petition from the inhabitants of Tumut, praying for the extension of the Southern railway to the banks of the Murrumhidgee, also to pay for necessary expenses incurred by Mr. R. B. Lynch presided and explained that some delay had occurred in the transmission of the official reply, the other matter was satisfactorily arranged. The Government response acknowledged the receipt' or the Tumnt inemori.il, and stated that the writer was directed hy the Colonial Secretary to state that, without the Government committing itself further to the views of the memorialist!!, sufficient provision has been made1 on the Estimates for 1870 to carry the railway to Yass. I perceive that in tho division that took place in the Legislative Assembly on Friday last, upon the bill introduced by Mr. Buchanan for the purpose of reducing future Governors' salaries, our member voted for this measure. This is one of the pledges that Mr. Brown made to his constituents previous to his election for this district

Many persons are not aware that from the 14th to the 28th of this month the Electoral Roll for the years 1870-1 is hung up at the Tumut ^/Jourt-hjiniseijiior public, inspection, where all electors who take an interest in the government of their native or adopted country can examine it, and should their names have been inadvertently omitted from its pages they have now an opportunity of having them inserted by making an application tn the Clerk of tho Court; also should any person's name appear on the list who the observer knows is not qualified to vote for the district, he may have it erased on the day of revision by giving notice to that person and to the clerk to that effect.

The tender of Mr. E. A. Fitzgerald has been accepted for the road work between Tumut and Tumut Plains, which will be proceeded with without delay.

Our cricket players are preparing for the game between Tumut and Adelong Clubs, on the Tumut cricket ground, on the 26th instant. The Adelong men are said to bo sanguine that they will recover their laurels on that occasion; but they may find that they have again overrated their strength.

This report is submitted in good faith. All endeavours have been made to make all entries authentic and correct. For any corrections and additional valuable information, maps and photos you may have please contact John

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