Yallowin

Thomas (1st) Wilkinson

"Yallowin"

Property Details:

Zone - Rural

Portions -

Acres - Originally 25 Sqr Miles.

LAND NOTES. - Conditional Purchases as follow were taken up at the Lands Offices on Tbursday last:— Tumut.— Thomas Wilkinson, 200a, Yellowin - (Ref- Wagga Wagga Advertiser (NSW : 1874 - 1905)(about) Previous issue Tuesday 12 August 1884 Page 4).

Some HISTORY OF Thomas (1st) WILKINSON.

MARRIAGE

On the 6th May, 1851 Mr Thomas (1st) WILKINSON married Miss Susanna BRIDLE in the Presbyterian Church, Tumut, NSW. - (Ref NSW BDM V1851152 80) - SUSANNAH BRIDLE was born on the 12th November, 1833, in Macquarie Fields NSW.- (Ref- NSW BDM V1833 408 18), and died on the 16th December, 1913, in Tumut NSW.

1901 - TUMUT. GOLDEN WEDDING - On the 6th instant, at Yellowin was celebrated their Golden Wedding of Mr and Mrs Thomas Wilkinson. A party consisting of their son's and daughters, with the wives and husbands of same assembled. A capital spread at dinner time was appreciated by those present. The afternoon passed pleasantly, tennis and cricket being indulged in and all hauds had a jolly good time. Teaover Mr. Thomas Wilkinson P.M. of Mudgee, the second eldest son, proposed the health of his father and mother.

Mr. S. F. Wilkinson said he was proud he was married and proud to celebrate his parents golden wedding day. He fervently hoped he would see his own The health of the pair was then drunk with musical honors. The company adjourned for a trip of the light fantastic.

During the night several songs and recitations were given, Mr. Thomas Wilkinson, of Springfield, singing with spirit, 'Old Rhine Wine. At midnight supper was held Mr. Thos. Wilkinson, of Mudgee, recited 'The Relief of Mildura' and 'The Chinese Cook,' which were received with acclamation. Mr. Jas. Brooks, of Adaminaby, favored the company with a sermon on the 'Prodigal Son,' creating uproarious laughter. Mr. S. P. Wilkinson then sang 'In the month of May,' which was well received. Mr. W. Beuzeville, recited 'How we beat the Favorite,' and in response to a decided encore, he convulsed the audience with 'The Christening of McGuiness McGee.' Mr. S. Wilkinson followed with the song, 'Come into the Garden, Maud. Miss Wilkinson sang 'The Fairy,' and for an encore, gave 'Tired.' Mr. Theodore Lampe sang a duet with Mr. H. Wilkinson, which was much appreciated.

Dancing was indulged in during the intervals of singing. Mr. Thomas Wilkinson was just recovering from a severe illness and looked as well as could be expected. Mrs. Wilkinson looked the picture of good health. Mr. Thos. Wilkinson, sen., said he was proud to see his sons and daughters. Most of them were married and settled in life. He was very thankful for the compliments tendered to him. - (Ref- Adelong and Tumut Express and Tumbarumba Post (NSW : 1900 - 1925)(about) Previous issue Friday 10 May 1901 Page 3).

Residence: 1857, Yallowin near Tumut NSW.

Children born to Thomas (1st) & Susanna WILKINSON

1a. 1852 - John (2nd) J Wilkinson was born to Thomas (1st) & Susanna in Tumut, NSW - (Ref NSW BDM V18523620 40/18520). - He died in 1937, in Wagga Wagga NSW.

1. 12th August, 1857 - William Edward (2nd) Wilkinson was born to Thomas (1st) & Susanna in Tumut, NSW - (Ref NSW BDM 11485). - He died in August 1939, in Tenterfield NSW.

2. 1859 - Elizabeth (2nd) Ann (Eliza) WILKINSON, was born to Thomas (1st) & Susanna in Tumut, NSW - (Ref NSW BDM 13014)

3. 1861 - Martha Wilkinson was born to Thomas (1st) & Susanna in Tumut, NSW - (Ref NSW BDM 13548). She died in 1944, in Peak Hill NSW.

4. 1863 - Henry '2nd' George William Wilkinson born to Thomas (1st) & Susanna in Tumut, NSW. - (Ref NSW BDM 14145). - He died in 1945, in Tumut NSW.

5. 1867 - Philip A Wilkinson was born to Thomas (1st) & Susanna in Tumut, NSW - (Ref NSW BDM 16755). He died in 1868 in Tumut, NSW. - (Ref NSW BDM 6738). Aged about 1 yr.

6. 1876 - Sydney Fitzroy Wilkinson was born to Thomas (1st) & Susannna in Tumut, NSW - (Ref NSW BDM 21153). He died in 1942 in Tenterfield, NSW - (Ref NSW BDM 4727/1942).

7. 1854 - THOMAS HENRY (2nd) WILKINSON, was born to Thomas (1st) & Susanna in ? - (Ref- NSW BDM V18543621 40/1854). He died in 1928, in Chatswood NSW. - In last week's issue of the "The Lone Hand" appeared two good photographs of Lieut Thomas Wilkinson and Gunner Clive Wilkinson, sons of Mr. Thomas Wilkinson sc, and grandsons of the late Mr. Thomas Wilkinson, of Yellowin Station. The former was also awarded the Military Cross for leading a bombing parly under a heavy fire. - (Ref- The Tumut Advocate and Farmers & Settlers' Adviser (NSW : 1903 - 1925)(about) Previous issue Tuesday 11 September 1917 Page 2).

8. 1874 - HERBERT OSWALD LEWIS WILKINSON, was born to Thomas (1st) & Susannna in 1874, in Tumut NSW. - (Ref- NSW BDM 20138/1874).

DEATH

1904 - Mr. Thomas Wilkinson, aged 86 years, one of the oldest pioneers of the Tumut district, and owner of the well-known Yellowin Station, has died. - (Ref- Evening News (Sydney, NSW : 1869 - 1931)(about) Saturday 16 July 1904 Page 6).

1909 - IN THE SUPREME COURT OF NEW SOUTH WALES.-Probate Jurisdiction.-In the Estate of Thomas (1st) WILKINSON, late of Yellowin, near Tumut, in the State of New South Wales, Grazier, deceased. Notice is hereby given - that the Third Account in the above Estate have this day been filed in the office, Chancery Square, Sydney, and all persons havng any claim of the said Estate, or being otherwise interested Herein, are hereby required to come in before me, at my office on or before the twenty-second day of June next, at 11.30 forenoon, and inspect the same, and if they shall think fit object thereto; otherwise: if the said Accounts be not objected to the same will be examined by me and passed according to law. Dated this eighteenth day of May, in the year 1909. T. W.GARRETT (L.S.), Registrar. TAYLOR and TARTAOVER, Russell Street, Tumut. by their Agent, GEO. TURNER, 58 Hunter Street, Sydney. - (Ref- The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842-1954) Monday 24 May 1909).

Tumut. (From Our Own Correspondent.) A very sad event occurred at Yellowin on Saturday afternoon last. Mrs. Thomas Wilkinson, of the station, took seriously ill on Friday night, and was seized with an apopletic fit. Mr. William Wilkinson, who lived a few miles distant, set out to see his aged mother about noon on Saturday, and on returning between 5 o'clock and 5.30, found his wife dead on the roadside, beside her saddle horse, which was tied to the fence. He carried her to his brother's house (Mr. Henry Wilkinson's) close by, and there they tried for several hours to restore life, but without avail. A magisterial enquiry was held by the coroner, Mr. W. J. Shelley, on Sunday, and a verdict was returned in accordance with medical testimony, that death was due to heart disease for which Dr. H. W. Mason had previously treated Mrs. Wilkinson.

The keenest sympathy is expressed everywhere for the bereaved husband in his great trouble, and there are two children, one of whom is at school in Sydney. The funeral took place on Monday afternoon, the last aad rites being performed by the Rev. T. E. Owens-Mell at the new cemetery, Mr. H. M. Hoad carrying out the undertaker's duties.

It is pleasing to learn that Mrs. Thomas Wilkinson, of Yellowin, has recovered considerably from her serious and unfortunate illness. - (Ref- Albury Banner and Wodonga Express (NSW : 1896 - 1939)(about) Previous issue Friday 12 May 1905 Page 3).

DEATH

1905 - Mrs. W. E. Wilkinson, of Talbingo, near Tumut, has been found dead alongside the road, near Yellowin. Death was due to heart failure. - (Ref- Australian Town and Country Journal (NSW : 1870 - 1907)(about) Previous issue Wednesday 10 May 1905).

SAD DEATH NEAR TUMUT.

The wife of Mr. W. E. Wilkinson, of Yellowin, near Tumut, died suddenly from heart failure on Saturday afternoon. The deceased lady was the sister-in-law of Mr. T. U. Wilkinson, Police Magistrate, of Wagga.

Her husband's mother, Mrs. Thomas Wilkinson, senr., sustuined a paralytic stroke on Saturday morning, and on the way home after a visit to his mother, who resided two miles away, Mr. W. K. Wilkinson found his wife lying lifeless almost a mile and a half from his own residence. The lady had evidently tried to ride on horse back to ascertain the nature of her mother-in-laws illness and could not have been more, than half an hour dead when she was discovered. She had dismounted, tied her horse to a fence, and taken off her gloves and belt. A magisterial inquiry showed that death was due to heart failure. The deceased lady, who was greatly resided, leaves one son, aged about 18 years and one daughter aged about l4 years, who was at school in Sydney.

According to later accounts Mrs. Thomas Wilkinson, senr., has improved. - (Ref- Wagga Wagga Advertiser (NSW : 1874 - 1905)(about) Previous issue Thursday 11 May 1905 Page 2).

Tumut. - (From Our Own Correspondent.) - A very sad event occurred at Yellowin on Saturday afternoon last. Mrs. Thomas Wilkinson, of the station, took seriously ill on Friday night, and was seized with an apopletic fit. Mr. William Wilkinson, who lived a few miles distant, set out to see his aged mother about noon on Saturday, and on returning between 5 o'clock and 5.30, found his wife dead on the roadside, beside her saddle horse, which was tied to the fence. He carried her to his brother's house (Mr. Henry Wilkinson's) close by, and there they tried for several hours to restore life, but without avail. A magisterial enquiry was held by the coroner, Mr. W. J. Shelley, on Sunday, and a verdict was returned in accordance with medical testimony, that death was due to heart disease, for which Dr. H. W. Mason had previously treated Mrs. Wilkinson. The keenest sympathy is expressed every where for the bereaved husband in his great trouble, and there are two children, one of whom is at -school in Sydney. The funeral took place on Monday afternoon, the last eadrites being performed by the Rev. T. E. Owens-Mell at the new cemetery, Mr. H. M. Hoad carrying out the undertaker's duties. It is pleasing to learn that Mrs. Thomas Wilkinson, of Yellowin, has recovered considerably from her serious and unfortunate illness. - (Ref- Albury Banner and Wodonga Express (NSW : 1896 - 1939)(about) Previous issue Friday 12 May 1905 Page 3).

DESTRUCTION OF DINGOES. TUMUT, Wednesday.

Mr. Wilkinson, of Yellowin station, has discovered a preparation for poisoning dingoes. He placed the mixture in the carcase of a cow, mix on the following day six full grown dingoes and two foxs were found dead near the spot.

(Ref- The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842-1954) Thursday 17 April 1902)

To Yellowin Index - To Front page

A RECORD OF OLDIE DAYS. ( ADELONG ANGUS )

The following is a record of the biography of Mr T. Wilkinson, sen., whose death at Yallowin we recently recorded and the particulars were written by Mr S. F. Wilkinson at the dictation of his father sometime before the date of his demise:— I was born at Liverpool, N.S.W., on 20th January, 1824, and lived there until eight years of age. There were only time or four business places in existence then. The present benevolent asylum was used as a hospital, under Dr Hill. My father was a farmer on George's River, two miles from the town, My mother was drowned in the river when I was seven years old, through getting capsized out of a log canoe she was taking across.

There were no houses in Goulburn when I came through on my way to Gundaroo, but on Mulwary River there was a Police Station, hotel and store.

Later on a number of convicts were put on to alter the road. On a hill the side of where the present town of Goulburn stands I saw two skeletons of men hanging on a gallows, and learned that they had been gibbetted for murdering a man named Roche, an overseer for Broughton, who lived on a Government grant near the present town. It was all convict labor those times. The first Governor who visited Goulburn, Governor Bourke, had the skeletons removed. Men were hanged in those days for stealing sheep and cattle 1 stayed for nine months at Guadaroo, 12 miles from Lake George, which was dry excepting one small swamp, where the water was a few inches deep. All lands were then owned by the Grown, and people's flocks and herds ran where they liked. Terence Aubrey Murray claimed one end of Lake George, where he ran a dairy and milked 300 cows, sending the butter to Sydney. Scrubby ridges about the land were swarming with wild cattle. M'Leod was the only sheepowner. BlackJellows were very plentiful, but they were pretty well civilised.

In 1838 I left Guadaroo, and rode up to Tumut, accompanied by Boyd, who drove a bullock team. My sister came up side with Boyd's wife in a cart. What were termed settled districts extended as far as Bomen in this direction, We struck the Tumut River at Darbalara, where Trecillia had a cattle station. Wagra was held by Osborne, and Brungle by Eatherine, each of whom owned cattle. We crossed the river above the Tumut racecourse, the crossing being known as Mundong.

There was no town then. The first store was opened a few months after I got there by a man named Cams. Where the Police Station now stands was & thick cluster of saplings and a big cattle camp.

There was only one station on Gilmore, which was owned by Shelley. At that time there were no defined boundaries to any of the stations. From Darbalara up this way there were only 12 stations, owned so follows:—

Tooth owned Tarabandra,

Broughton Gocup,

T. Boyd west side of Gilmore,

G. Shelley from Westwood to the head of the Gilmore,

Rose Springfield and Werebobolda,

W, Shelley Bombowloe,

Broughton Mundonga,

Troys Killimicat,

UTEachrin Brungle,

Osborne Wagra, and

Trecillia Darbalaia,

We lived 18 months on the Gilmore, at the place now known aa Rosebank. The Gilmore Greek was dry from end to end of 1838 until the middle of 1839. Wheat was then worth £2 per buahel and hard to procure at that.

We took up a license for a holding on the Gilmore, but a dispute arose with Shelley as to the boundaries. We were ordered to move by Commissioner Bingham, who possessed great power at that time. We built where O'Brien's house now stands and had one crop of wheat which was half smut.

My brother John was with me then. We had about 70 head of cattle. Bingham moved our license over to Yallowin. That was in June, 1840, and we were the first there. We settled on the flat, and put in a crop of wheat at the top end of it. All wheat was ground by hand flour-mills, the nearest mill worked by power being at Yass.

Mr. M'A.ligtor was the only man who grew wheat for sale, and this was on a farm on Gilmore Creek where Korn now resides.

Cultivating was done with the old swing plough drawn by bullocks. All crops were reaped by hand and threshed with flails. Rations were served out in wheat and each man had to grind his own flour.

We bred cattle at Yallowin, fat bullocks then being worth 20s per head in Sydney, and hard to sell at that. Two-year old fl were worth 10a, 3 yrs lls, and 5 and 6 year old store bullocks 20a. We paid about £25 a year for our squatting license. We could hire good men for £12 a year. Whitty used to pay his men £5 a year, and gave them a 2 year old filly each. He was one of the best employers at that time.

Dr Clayton owned East and West Blowering in 1839, and about two years later Whitty bought the property.

There were no fences existing anywhere. Our cattle grazed from Tumut to Lobb's Hole.

Davis had Yarrangobilly run in 1840.

There had been stations on Long Plain, Tantangra, Coolamon and Currnngorambla, but they were all deserted on account of the snow.

In 1850 we took our cattle up to Long Plain (I was in partnership with W. Bridle, sen. then). We thought we could dairy there, but the 6th of March, 1841, snow fell, and this disgusted me, go we oame back to Yallowin, leaving our cattle at Loag Plain, where 80 of them perished in the snow, - (Ref- Albury Banner and Wodonga Express (NSW : 1896 - 1939)(about) Previous issue Friday 22 July 1904 Page 48).

1912 - MRS. THOS WILKINSON - ANOTHER OCTOGENERIAH PIOHEER. - There is in the decree of Scripture a termination to human life — the young die., the oldest must, though man live to fourscore years his days are but labor and Sorrow — and it must be considered a happy release to Susanna, the beloved wife of the late Thomas Wilkinson and whose demise we briefly reported in our last, for the reason that for over seven and a half years she has been in a semi-conscious condition, practically dead to the detail of the outside world and waiting the call to her eternal home. The cause of her death as we stated before was paralysis, supervening on senile decay. During these long and trying years, her eldest daughter (Mrs. E. J. Bridle) has been her constant and ever-ready attendant and with a trained nurse and every attention from Drs, Mason and Browne, her life, long despaired of was secured until the night of Monday last. The public little know the trials willingly borne by her faithfull attendent and the mothers marvellous constitution was made determinedly apparent in her final desperate fight — mind over matter— at the last.

The subject of our obituary was tbe daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. William Bridle, the former of Somerset, England, the latter of whom was born on the ocean.

In the year 1851 she married Mr. Thomas Wilkinson of Yellowin Station, who predeceased her by eight years. Visitors to Yellowin will remember the old homestead overlooking the Tumut river and situated on the foothill of Mount Chicara; the special flower garden in front was charm to all beholders, and contained a variety of flora seldom been away from tbe city.

Our departed one spent a lot of her time she loved. In the early days the experiences of station life were considerable and consisted in many a sally with the blacks, but husband and wife laboured unitedly and rearing a large family carved out a happy home in the black fella bush' Mrs Wilkinson, were the trouble of her later years came upon her was a woman of considable energy, a staunoh beliver in her churoh, the doctrines of whioh she inouloated in her family, and her principal aim in life was their education and the study of their welfare. A true and faithful wife, she felt the load of her husband keenly, and her health for years troublous, became more accentuated in its desperate character. Stroke after stroke occurred, and for 7 years she was practically dead. She leaves behind her eight sons, viz:

John (Yellowin),

Thomas Henry, (S.M. Sydnoy),

Alfred Ernest (Tumut),

Henry George

William (Blowering),

William (Northern Rives),

Philip,

Norma and Herbert Oswald Lawis (Yellowin) and

Sydney F. (Sydney), and two daughters, namely

Mrs. Edward John Bridle (Tumut) and

Mrs. W. A. Lampe (Peak Hill), notwithstanding all filling good positions, to mourn their irreparable loss. The funeral took place on Wednesday last, her remains being interred in the Ohuroh of England portion of the new cemetery, Tumut. Mr. H. W. Hoad was the undertaker and Rev. Ross Edwards officiated at the grave. We tender the bereaved ones our deepest condolences.

Passing out of the shadow Into a clearer light;

Stopping behind the curtain,

Getting a clearer Bight,

Laying aside a burden,

This weary mortal coil;

Done with the world's vaxations,

Done with its tears and toll.

Tired of all earth's playthings;

Heartsick and reidy to sleep;

Ready to bid our friends farewell;

Wondering why they weep.

Passing out of the shadow into eternal day —

Why do we call it dying,

This sweet going away ?- (Ref- Adelong and Tumut Express and Tumbarumba Post (NSW : 1900 - 1925)(about) Previous issue Friday 20 December 1912 Page 2).

At the Cooma Police Court on Monday of last week, the stock inspeotor for the Cooma distriot (Mr, H. M. Bloomfield) proceeded against Robert Thomas Haggar, a drover in charge of 609 mixed cattle, for having travelled from Nimitybelle to Tumut for H. 0. h. Wilkinson, of Yellowin, Tumut, and having failed to produoe a travelling statement for all the oattle in his charge. Defendant -pleaded guilty and was fined £10, and ordered to pay £2 6s costs. ~ Defendant's statement only showed 469 cattle, leaving 150 not accounted for. - (Ref- The Tumut Advocate and Farmers & Settlers' Adviser (NSW : 1903 - 1925)(about) Previous issue Tuesday 26 May 1914 Page 2).

- Msssrs. P. H. and S. Wilkinson, of Yallowin, have started a stud herd of Hereford cattle, having procured some of the best strains from well known herds, introducing some of the well-known local strain. Their herd comprises thirty cows and heifers and two bulls, which by their pedigrees should equal any stud herd up country, and by judicious breeding I feel sure they will have no trouble of disposing of their increase in those parts, as the Hereford strain has for many years held supremacy in the mountains over any other breed, being excellent for beef, heavy, hardy, and mature young. So I wish tbe Messrs. Wilkinson every success in their new undertaking. - (Ref- Albury Banner and Wodonga Express (NSW : 1896 - 1939)(about) Previous issue Friday 3 December 1897).